Search This Blog

Contact the Blog

Send your news and pictures to the blog here jan@janwright.co.uk

Contact the Crewenews by using our form click here

Phone the Blog 0794-1728819

Join me on the forum below as I am on the staff as Samuria 24/7/365 worldwide support all FREE

 PC Help Forum

'

Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Register Now for the St Luke’s 2012 Midnight Walk

 

Registration is now open for ladies to participate in the 2012 Midnight Walk, to raise money for St Luke’s (Cheshire) Hospice, which will take place on Saturday 9 June, through Crewe and Nantwich.

For the eighth consecutive year, fundraisers at St Luke’s (Cheshire) Hospice are busy organising their phenomenally successful annual Midnight Walk.

The walk which has grown in recognition since its launch in 2005 commences at midnight and will see 1,700 ladies cover 13.1 miles to raise sponsorship money for St Luke’s (Cheshire) Hospice. Due to its overwhelming popularity this year’s route has been reversed to accommodate registration, parking and facilities for the walkers. The walk will now commence at MMU’s Crewe campus.

Jane Thompson, a head of event management for over ten years explained how the walk came about: “St Luke’s was inspired to launch the ladies only Midnight Walk by a former patient of the hospice, who was suffering with breast cancer. It’s definitely a challenge, as 13.1 miles is a long way; but it’s a lot of fun and a different experience for everybody.”

The wide array of ladies, who have been inspired to join in with the Midnight Walk, has surprised even the organisers. The youngest walker was just seven years of age and the oldest walker to date was 84, with one walker coming all the way from Germany to participate!

If 13.1 miles sounds a bit too far, there is an option to participate in the Half Moon version of the walk, which totals 6.5 miles.

The start of the race is a spectacle to behold, with the enthusiastic participants embarking on the 13 mile stretch in a sea of brightly coloured t-shirts. Many of the walkers have a personal connection to the charity, or have a friend or family member who has battled with a life threatening illness. Other walkers are eager to do their bit for an incredibly worthy cause. 

St Luke’s is hopeful of raising in excess of £250,000 from the 2012 Midnight Walk, which will go to directly supporting the running of the hospice; which costs in the region of £6,200 per day run.

If you would like to sign up to participate in this year’s Midnight Walk, you can register on the website: www.midnightwalk.co.uk or call 01606 555 688.

Councillors unite to improve school funding

 

Councillors of all political parties have voted unanimously in favour of writing to the Department for Education, asking them to look again at the way schools are funded nationally.

Cheshire East students currently receive one of the lowest funding levels per pupil in the country.

Councillor Hilda Gaddum, Cabinet member with responsibility for children and family services, submitted a notice of motion at the recent full meeting of Council.

The letter, from all political group leaders, will:

· Thank local MPs for bringing the issues to the government’s attention:

· Welcome the government’s commitment to review the funding system for schools;

· Support an approach which provides a fairer level of funding nationally; and

· Point out that Cheshire East receives well below the national average from the Dedicated Schools Grant, and the reasons why are not clear.

If funded at the same rate as Cheshire West, Cheshire East would receive an additional £10m of funding. Cheshire East receives £200 less per pupil in guaranteed unit funding, compared to Cheshire West. 

It will also ask the government to look at the funding arrangements for academies and the effect this has on local authority grants. The letter will state that the reduction in formula grant to reflect academy conversions is not appropriate, particularly as there is no clear basis on which such deductions have been made.

Councillor Gaddum said: “The achievement of pupils is a priority for Cheshire East but low base funding from government is making this increasingly difficult.

“In addition, the extra money being given to academies, who predominantly have the fewest children with educational problems, exacerbates the problem.

“To have unanimous cross-party support on this is extremely encouraging and shows how important the future of our education system is to my fellow councillors.

“I hope that the Department for Education will note the contents of our letter and use it as part of their review into school funding.”

Cheshire East Cabinet recommends end of Waste PFI scheme

 

Cheshire East Council’s Cabinet is expected to make the decision to discontinue its joint waste PFI scheme with Cheshire West and Chester Council on Monday (March 5).

This project was intended to run for 25 years and dispose of around 180,000 tonnes of Cheshire’s household waste, each year. A provisional preferred bidder had been selected.

Cheshire East spent £1.6m on the project on the understanding the Government would be supplying £130m support. However, following a Government review of all PFI (private finance initiative) schemes, this financial support was withdrawn.

Both Councils sought a Judicial Review of the Government decision but this was overruled by the High Court.

A number of options have since been considered for the future of the project but abandonment was deemed to be the lowest legal risk available to Cheshire East.

Cheshire West and Chester has already formally announced its withdrawal from the scheme.

Councillor Peter Mason, Cabinet member with responsibility for procurement and shared services, said: “It is with regret that we have to take this decision. However, Cheshire East believes it has no other option but to formally abandon the waste PFI project.

“Both ourselves and Cheshire West and Chester have spent considerable time, money and effort in attempting to minimise the impact that the loss of Government PFI credits would have on the project.

“This Council is now in a position of having to write off the £1.6m spent on the scheme and we are still in the position of having to find a sustainable method of disposing of Cheshire’s household waste from April 2014. 

“We are keen to find a solution that meets the needs of Cheshire East from this date.”

Welcome to the MP’s 113th news bulletin

Edward Timpson MP

Monday 27, February 2012

Welcome ...

Welcome to this my 113th news bulletin.

I know from personal experience how adoption can transform the lives of some of the most abused and  neglected children in our country.  It is a generous act - and it can achieve incredible results.

That's why I am delighted that the government are determined that adoption should happen more often and should happen more speedily.  By changing our attitude towards adoption, reducing the unnecessary bureaucracy of the assessment process and freeing up professionals to rely on their own judgement, we can feel confident that we are able to create a more efficient and effective adoption system.

I know that some supporters of adoption will have heard this before, and will be sceptical.  But they can be assured that the government will not settle for a modest, temporary uplift in adoption numbers, nor a short-lived acceleration in the process.  Nothing less than a significant and sustained improvement will do.  The most neglected, the most abused, the most damaged children in our care deserve nothing less.

Please remember, you can always contact me directly if you have any questions for me.

You can forward the bulletin on to your friends and family, who can sign up themselves by clicking here for my website.

Best wishes 

Edward Timpson
Member of Parliament for Crewe & Nantwich

back to top

I have recently...

  • Held an advice surgery in my Crewe office on saturday morning
  • Spoke in the House of Commons during the Welfare Reform Bill. Click here for more.
  • Made representations to a full meeting of Cheshire East Council calling for them to withdraw their application for a Gypsy and Travellers site on Parkers Road in Crewe
  • Attended and spoke at the Rotary Day held at Crewe library where I learnt more about each of the 34 individual local charities supported by Crewe Rotary over the last year.
  • Chaired a meeting of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Adoption and Fostering about adoption support

back to top

Westminster Report

Main Content Inline Smalls

Read my most recent Westminster Report

Click here or on the image

back to top

Photos & Video ...

Main Content Inline Small

Edward working at Leighton Hospital

You can view all my photos and video at edwardtimpsonmp.com

back to top

Community News

Main Content Inline Small

Community & Voluntary Services Cheshire East

Looking to find opportunities to help out in the community? CVS (Community & Voluntary Services) Cheshire East is a Registered Charity whose aim is to be valued as the leading support and development organisation for the Voluntary and Community Sector in Cheshire East.

The CVS's volunteer  team can support you in several ways:

  • Help you to find a suitable volunteer role
  • Help organisations to find suitable volunteers
  • Encourage best practice in volunteer management
  • To promote volunteering and the added value that it brings to our community

To find out more visit their website by clicking here
Do you have community news to share? Email me and it could be here too!

back to top

Crewe gypsy site campaigners say they have concrete evidence of plan's flaws

Crewe Chronicle

CAMPAIGNERS against the council’s proposed Gypsy site in Crewe say they’ve found concrete evidence the plan is ‘seriously flawed’.

They believe they have come up with a ‘defining document’ to suggest the Parkers Road site is too small for its intended purpose, and could end up putting tenants’ lives at risk.

Members of Crewe Against Traveller’s Sites (CATS) are once again urging the council to withdraw the plans immediately.

Aided by Government guidance on good design practice for Gypsy sites, the document centres on the site’s unsuitability to house 10 pitches and an amenity block.

It states: “Using measurements on the plans, the pitch for each static is only seven metres long. Government guidance states the site should be capable of providing sufficient space for the average-size trailer of up to 15m.

“Thus, the pitches are of insufficient size to accommodate the average-size static caravan.”

Concerns are also raised surrounding the accessibility for the emergency services.

The plans show the site road is only 4.5m wide, meaning emergency vehicles would struggle to pass to reach some pitches.

The document concludes: “The Parkers Road site is by far the smallest of all proposed sites. We believe the assessment of alternative sites was a sham.”

Chairman of CATS Glenn Perris said: “We believe this is a defining document as to the serious flaws within the planning application.

“The overriding factor is that this site is too small for its intended purpose, to the point that tenants’ safety could be compromised.

“It’s now time for Cheshire East to stop its arrogant march on the good people of Crewe and bring a halt to this ill-thought out proposal. The taxpayer is seeing their money being wasted on a scheme that simply isn’t fit for purpose.”

Edward Timpson MP added: “This is a fascinating and devastating technical deconstruction of a flawed planning application.

“This is clearly the wrong location, and the council should ensure the plan is shelved as soon as possible for the good of my constituents.”

The council has always maintained the site is the most suitable location and submitted a planning application on January 18.

The plans are due to be discussed at the next meeting of full council on February 23.

To view and comment on the application visit www.cheshireeast.gov.uk.

back to top

MP Edward Timpson champions Cheshire cheeses in Parliament

Nantwich News

Nantwich MP Edward Timpson has called on Parliament to promote local produce by championing the cause of Cheshire cheese.

Mr Timpson called on Leader of the House of Commons, the Rt Hon Sir George Young MP, to hold a debate on produce.

He said: “Members may be aware Nantwich plays host to the world’s largest cheese fair, which showcases outstanding local produce including the unbeatable Cheshire cheese.”

The Leader of the House replied: ”He (Timpson) has drawn attention to the wide range of cheeses that are available in this country and available for export, and I commend what he has done to promote that fine product.”

Mr Timpson added: “Demand for cheese in this country is still high, we spend more on cheese per week than we do on charitable giving, yet we still import from France despite having a rich domestic dairy industry of our own as in the south of my constituency.

“This is really an effort to support the local industry and remind people of the hidden gem that is Cheshire cheese.”

Local cheese producers like Joseph Heler sell more than 1,000 tonnes of Cheshire cheese a year, and are capable of producing 9,500 tonnes a year.

© 2012 Nantwich News

back to top

Official re-opening of Crewe Library

Cheshire East Council

MP Edward Timpson was joined by a host of Cheshire East Councillors for the official re-opening of Crewe Library on Saturday, February 3.

The Crewe MP was welcomed by staff and members from the local authority, following a recent refurbishment programme.

The library was partially closed over the Christmas and New Year period, with improvements made to many aspects of the well-used facility.

Self-service terminals, a new cafe area and a bigger children’s library are just some of the improvements library-users can look forward to.

New shelving, carpets, ceiling panels and energy-efficient lights have also been installed.

Cheshire East Councillor David Brown, Cabinet member with performance and capacity said:

“Here at Cheshire East Council, we recognise the importance of our libraries; they are no longer simply a place to borrow books, they are a place to find information, use the internet and to meet people.
“I would like to thank Edward Timpson for his support and all the staff who have worked so hard to keep the library up and running through the refurbishment.

“I hope that the improvements are welcomed by the local community and it encourages more people to use this much-loved library.”

back to top

Edward Timpson backs work of still birth and neonatal charity

Crewe Chronicle

SANDS, the stillbirth and neonatal death charity, believes as many as 1,200 stillbirths every year in the UK could be avoided.

Edward Timpson MP has attended a parliamentary reception in the House of Commons organised by Sands for the launch of its new report, Preventing Babies’ Deaths: what needs to be done.

About 6,500 babies are stillborn or die shortly after birth every year in the UK.

The charity’s report proposes that hundreds of babies’ lives could be saved every year through a combination of more research, better care and greater awareness of the risks of stillbirth and newborn baby death.

Mr Timpson said: “I was shocked to discover the scale of baby deaths in the UK. 17 babies are stillborn or die shortly after birth every day, with stillbirth being the largest contributor to child deaths under the age of five years.

“These deaths have a devastating impact on parents and their families, and I fully support Sands in their call for urgent action to prevent baby deaths in the future.”

The report highlights that advances in neonatal medicine have led to small but welcome reductions in the number of newborn babies dying.

However, Sands remains extremely concerned by the UK’s persistently high stillbirth rates – stillbirth numbers in the UK are the same today as they were in the late 1990s, with one in 200 babies being stillborn.

The UK has one of the highest stillbirth rates when compared to similar high income countries, yet Sands strongly believes that with the appropriate commitment and investment in research and improved care, a reduction in these rates is achievable and should be a key focus for all those concerned with maternity services.

┼áNeal Long, chief executive of Sands, addressed MPs and said: “A third of stillborn babies – about 1,200 babies – are perfectly formed and born at gestations when they might safely be delivered.

“But routine antenatal care is failing to detect far too many babies who need help.

“These babies’ deaths are those that Sands, researchers and clinicians working in obstetrics, believe are avoidable deaths.

“We want lives saved and families spared the desperate heartbreak of losing their precious baby.”

back to top

5 ways to contact Edward Timpson

back to top

Friday, 24 February 2012

Nantwich man sentenced for grooming teenager online

George Alexander Joinson

A man from Nantwich who groomed a teenager through a music sharing website has been sentenced to more than three years behind bars.

George Alexandra Joinson (56) from Barony Court in Nantwich pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to sexual activity with a child under 16, and 16 counts of making indecent photographs or pseudo-photographs of a child.

He was sentenced at Chester Crown Court on 17 February 2012 to three years and four months in prison. An indefinite Sexual Offences Prevention Order was made against him; he is banned from working with children and will be a registered sex offender for life.

Cheshire Police were alerted to Joinson′s illegal activities after a mother from Derbyshire reported her 13 year old daughter missing on 20 April 2011.

The mother believed her daughter had been staying with a friend for a few days but discovered that she was not at a friend′s house and alerted police.

Police in Derbyshire found an old mobile phone at the girl′s address which showed she had been communicating with Joinson. In the back of the phone behind the battery was a piece of paper with Joinson′s address. On the phone they discovered photographs of an elderly man which transpired to be Joinson.

Officers from Nantwich visited his home in Barony Court and made a search but the teenager wasn′t there. He denied he had ever met up with her and said they′d only ever texted.

Police arrested Joinson on suspicion of grooming and he was interviewed about the whereabouts of the missing girl.

In the meantime she returned to her home address where she was interviewed by Derbyshire officers. She admitted visiting him on two occasions, and having unprotected sex on the first occasion.

As the investigation continued Cheshire officers then arrested Joinson for sexual activity with a child and searched his home, seizing DVDs and computers.

Detectives from Cheshire Police′s eForensics unit unearthed 32 indecent images.

DC Paul Carslake said: "It emerged that the victim had started chatting with Joinson on a music sharing website called Bearshare, which members have to be 14 to join. She stated that she told him she was actually 13. From his online profile she was aware of his age.

"This highlights how imperative it is that parents are aware of the sites their children are accessing and who they are communicating with.

"The internet is an amazing tool that a lot of families have access to, but it also has its dangers. There are a number of websites that provide information and tools to protect children online and I would strongly advise all parents to utilise these when educating their children about how to stay safe."

Websites to help people keep safe online.
http://www.cheshire.police.uk/

Advice on internet safety and security, including social networking and chatrooms.

http://www.getsafeonline.org/
Advice about firewalls, spyware and antivirus protection and how to protect children online.
http://www.childnet.com/
Adult awareness e-safety
http://www.kidsmart.org.uk/
Internet safety advice
http://www.getnetwise.org/
Filtering tools and video clips of experts talking about online safety issues.
http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/
You can download resources from this site on e-safety
http://www.ceop.gov.uk/
All you need to know about online safety for your child
www.bbc.co.uk/webwise/course/
All you need to know about online safety for your child

Misuse of Police non-emergency number

 

The new non emergency 101 police number is now active in Cheshire. There has been some confusion regarding when people should dial 101 and when people should dial the emergency 999 number. The 101 number should be used to report crimes that don′t require urgent assistance from the police. The purpose of 101 is to enable emergency calls to be processed more efficiently.

The non emergency number has changed but the emergency number is still 999. 101 should be used to report less urgent crime or disorder, used for general enquiries and to arrange to speak to a local officer.

When someone dials 101, the system automatically locates the area for that person and connects them to the relevant police force. A recorded message informs the caller which force they are being connected to, if they live on a boundary with numerous forces a choice is given of which one to be connected to.

The crimes that people should be reporting on 101 include the theft of a car, damaged property, minor traffic incidents, to report someone involved in drug use or dealing or to give police information about a crime in their area.

When a crime is in progress always call 999. It is also important to dial 999 not 101 when there is danger to a person′s life, or violent conduct is being carried out or threatened.

Cheshire Police Assistant Chief Constable Janette McCormick says:

"The 101 non-emergency number is a really easy number for the public to use to contact us about non-urgent issues. Please remember however in the event of an emergency always use the 999 number."

ACC McCormick added:

"It is important that people use the 101 number. Over the coming months we need to ensure the 40,000 people who call us per month who do not require an emergency response stop calling on the 0845 number and use 101 instead. It is a much easier number to remember and costs 15 pence from any landline or mobile at any time of day or night

Thursday, 23 February 2012

Men to face fraud charges after being arrested in Crewe by local officers

 
Following a stop check by officers on patrol in Crewe town centre on Monday 20 February 2012 two men have been charged with a number of fraud offences linked to card skimming.
Radu Andrei Matache (26) and Marius Lucian Anton (27) both from Corby in Northamptonshire appeared at Crewe Magistrates on Wednesday 22 February 2012.
Matache was charged with acquiring, using or possessing criminal property, failing to surrender to police bail, and two counts of possessing, controlling an article for use in fraud.
Anton was charged with acquiring, using or possessing criminal property and possessing or controlling an article for use in fraud.

Rogue roofers successfully prosecuted

 

A father and son roofing duo have each been given a 12-month community order and instructed between them to pay more than £3,400 in compensation and costs, after misleading customers in Macclesfield.

Donald James Warner, 50, and James Dean Warner, 29, traded as JW Roofing and Building and carried out work across Cheshire East and Staffordshire.

Cheshire East Council’s consumer protection and investigations team brought the prosecution after receiving several complaints that the pair cold-called residents using false and misleading claims in order to carry out work on their property.

This was mostly roofing work that was either never required, or the exaggerated claims they made pressurised the resident to have the work done.

They also received payment for work when it was not carried out.

The Warners, who live on Adams Avenue, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, pleaded guilty to all offences.

They were convicted on February 2, 2012, at Macclesfield Magistrates’ Court.

In addition they had been advised on previous occasions that they legally have to provide customers with a written right to cancel, in a prescribed format, when contracts are being signed. They continued to ignore this advice and failed to provide it in the right format, which is a criminal offence.

Councillor Rachel Bailey, Cabinet member with responsibility for safer and stronger communities, said: “This prosecution should send out a clear message: that the Council will not tolerate rogue traders conning Cheshire East residents. I would like to thank our consumer protections and investigations team for their hard work on this case.

“Fortunately, the large majority of traders across the Borough are reputable and trustworthy. We are part of the national Buy With Confidence Scheme where accredited businesses undergo strict vetting and background checks.

“To find out more please go to www.buywithconfidence.gov.uk.”   

Anyone with an elderly or vulnerable relative or neighbour are encouraged to consider the Nominated Neighbour Scheme developed by the Council’s consumer protection and investigations team. It is designed to help vulnerable people who are known targets for criminals who cold call at their homes.

More information on this scheme can be found at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk

Anyone with concerns about doorstep callers or would like to request a Nominated Neighbour pack contact Consumer Direct on 08454 04 05 06.

Police seek public's help following high value theft at Sandbach services

 

Police investigating the theft of £45,000 worth of electrical items from a lorry parked on Sandbach services are appealing to the public across the North West for help.
Sometime between 8pm on 6 February 2012 and 6am on 7 February 2012 a curtainside trailer which was parked at the services on the Northbound side of the M6 was slashed and seven pallets containing Tefal coffee machines and Actifry machines were stolen.
Det Sgt Glyn Leech from Crewe CID said: "We are appealing both to any witnesses who may have seen suspicious activity at the services and also to anyone who may have been offered these machines, which are quite distinctive.
"The specific items are KP100640 NDG Piccolo red, KP100040 NDG Piccolo black, GH800015FRY Actifry Plus 1.2kg in black and AH900015 FRY Actifry Family white/grey.
"If you are offered the items in any circumstances including online, I would urge you to contact police on 101 quoting incident 88 of 7 February 2012.
"Alternatively information can be given anonymously on the Crimestoppers number 0800 555 111."

Wednesday, 22 February 2012

Police seek witnesses to pedestrian RTC in Alsager

 

Police are keen to speak to the driver of a white van that collided with a man in Alsager in December 2011.

The collision happened on Wednesday 14 December, however it was not reported to police until Wednesday 8 February 2012.

At 4:30pm a small white van collided with a pedestrian on Talke Road, Alsager, outside Bargain Booze and Motorway′s car accessories shop.

The driver of the van stopped to check the welfare of the 87-year-old man at the time but his injuries were not believed to be serious. The collision was not reported to police.

In the days after the collision however the victim′s condition deteriorated and he has since spent several weeks in hospital. His condition is now described as comfortable.

PC Tony Hayhurst said: "We are particularly keen to identify the white van in question and would ask the driver to make contact with us so we can fully establish the circumstances surrounding the collision. I appreciate he did stop at the time to check on the victim, and will probably be unaware of how the situation developed so I would urge him to get in touch.

"I am also keen to speak to anyone who witnessed the collision."

Anyone with any information about the incident is asked to call PC Tony Hayhurst at the Eastern Operational Support Unit on 101 quoting incident number 862 of 8 February 2012."

Eleven Pence a Week Rise Safeguards Policing

 

The policing element of council tax in Cheshire is being increased by 3.94 per cent. It will add £5.69 a year; eleven pence a week, to the council tax bill for a Band D home.

Margaret Ollerenshaw, Chairman of Cheshire Police Authority said, "We are aware of the financial strains many people are facing at the moment. We looked carefully at the idea of freezing council tax at last year′s level. After careful consideration, we decided this small increase would help maintain front line policing services and keep the people of Cheshire safe.

"It means the reduction in the number of police officers in Cheshire during 2012/13 can be limited to 25, instead of the 48 required if we opted to freeze council tax."

This budget is the final one to be set by the Police Authority before the Authority is replaced by a Police and Crime Commissioner in November. The Chairman described it as "arguably the most difficult of the seventeen budgets set by the Authority".

She said, "We are working against a background of budget cuts.

£33 million in savings must be found by 2014/15, compared to the figures for 2010/11. That level of saving is not easy. It is depressing to see the level of cuts we are having to make following the steady investment we have made over the life of the Authority to ensure the Constabulary has the capability and capacity to make Cheshire safer and to protect the public from harm.

"So far the performance of the Constabulary has remained stable and we have not yet seen any increase in crime, or the deterioration in satisfaction levels which we feared."

During 2011/12 the Authority reduced the budget by £12 million. During 2012/13 another £13.1 million in savings must be achieved. Inflation has also added to the basic cost of equipment and services.

Margaret Ollerenshaw said,

"We have identified the savings required next year. As more than eighty per cent of the budget relates to people, it is regrettable that the scale of the cuts means unavoidable reductions in the number of police officers and staff.

"We were offered a one-off grant to freeze council tax for 2012/13. If we had accepted, the result would have been a shortfall for the following year when the grant was not available. That would have meant even more savings in 2013/14. We have always taken our responsibility to provide an efficient and effective police service very seriously. We must take a long term view of the impact of our decisions on policing, not just a one-year view.

"As a result we decided on a small increase in council tax, as requested by Dave Whatton,the Chief Constable, which will offset some of the reduction in police officer posts. The Chief Constable gave us his assurance that this funding will be used to maintain visible and accessible officers in our communities.

"To achieve the savings required by the Coalition Government we are also working with partners to share costs and remove waste and duplication. We are taking steps to share specialist functions and equipment with other police forces and agencies. We have created a Business Services Centre which has achieved savings in finance, human resources, estates and procurement. In April, there will be further changes when some of these services will be shared with Northamptonshire Police Authority in a ground-breaking initiative to deliver further savings whilst protecting front line resources.

"Every aspect of how policing is delivered in Cheshire is under review in an attempt to find ways of increasing efficiency and productivity. With the cooperation and hard work of officers and staff the results, so far, have been positive. Statistics issued by the Government in January showed an eight per cent reduction in crime in Cheshire, with nearly 5,300 fewer victims than in the previous year. Reductions in burglary, violence against the person and vehicle crime were significantly better than the national figures.

"We need this success to continue. During the next nine months we will continue to work extremely closely with the Chief Constable to minimise the impact of the cuts on the service we deliver to the people of Cheshire."

"In November the Police Authority will hand over its duties and powers to an elected Police and Crime Commissioner. We are working to make sure the transition is achieved in a secure and effective way. We believe this 3.94 per cent increase will help to put the Commissioner on a sound footing to maintain policing in Cheshire at a level where it is a safe place to live, work or visit."

The total budget for policing Cheshire in 2012/13 will be £172.557 million; compared to £177.21 million in 2011/12.

The annual charge for a Band D Home will be £150.22, compared to £144.53 in 2011/12.

Police officer numbers are expected to reduce from 1998 at Mar 31st 2012 to 1973 at Mar 31st 2013.

The number of Police Community Support Officers is expected to rise from 215 to 222.

Other Police staff posts are expected to reduce from 1637 to 1510.

If the option to freeze the policing element of council tax had been taken, the total budget (including the £1.6million additional grant) would have been £170.411million.

The Authority sought wide consultation with the public on the budget. Methods used included roadshows, a webchat, meeting business representatives, an on line questionnaire and media releases. Nearly sixty per cent of the people who responded to the budget consultation survey were in favour of a small council tax increase and rejection of the additional one-off grant.

Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe – Don’t be SAD this winter

 

Throughout the winter, Cheshire East Council and its partner agencies in the Adult Safeguarding Board have been providing information and key contact numbers as part of its Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe campaign. This is intended to assist, reassure and empower its most vulnerable people by providing information at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/winter and through the local media.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can affect as many as a third of all people.

Also known as the ‘winter blues’, it is officially recognised by doctors as a medical condition and the Cheshire East Adult Safeguarding Board is urging anyone who is feeling unusually lethargic or depressed this winter to make contact with their GP.

People in the UK are more susceptible to SAD as they experience large changes in

light levels between the summer and winter.

They also experience periods of dark, gloomy weather which can reduce the amount of light received and so it therefore has a profound effect on body clocks.

A combination of a change in seasonal light, hectic lifestyles and the periods of darker days and poorer weather can have dramatic effects.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cabinet member with responsibility for health and wellbeing, said: “Our Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe campaign features a range of information on numerous subjects including how to get help if people feel they are suffering with depression or lethargy.

“By visiting our website, we can point people in the right direction. Anybody who feels they are lacking in energy, are unable to carry out a normal routine or has sleep problems, finds it hard to stay awake during the day or is having disturbed nights should think about speaking to a health professional.”

Health professionals are in a good position to assess the nature and severity of any changes in mood and advise on the best course of action. Often just the opportunity to talk can provide relief and reassurance.

GPs are also in a position to refer people to experienced health care practitioners, counselling colleagues or to council and voluntary sector services that can help with a range of practical and social problems which may be contributing to increased anxiety and depression.

Other potential features of SAD include:

· Loss of libido, not interested in physical contact;

· Anxiety, inability to cope;

· Social problems, irritability, not wanting to see people;

· Depression, feelings of gloom and despondency for no apparent reason;

· Craving for carbohydrates and sweet foods, leading to weight gain.

Derek Thomas, the independent chair of the Cheshire East Adult Safeguarding Board, said: “For people who are already considered vulnerable, SAD can further increase this risk to them. We are beginning to understand much better the relationship between vulnerability to abuse and our mental health.

“A significant number of those who are referred to the Council’s safeguarding team as victims of abuse have long-term mental health problems but, in addition, we now realise that temporary episodes of physical or mental ill health, such as those caused by SAD, can lead to increased vulnerability.

“It is at times like these that people may be less able to protect themselves or seek help. It is therefore important that we all show more understanding to our partners, parents, friends and neighbours and show extra vigilance and willingness to report any concerns.”

Meanwhile, people in Macclesfield enjoyed a Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe road show event on Friday.

The Council’s housing team, Age UK, Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) and fire service colleagues joined forces to hand out information packs and make people aware of help that can be made available to protect them from the cold.

There are also events on the following dates:

· Thursday, February 23 – ASDA, Crewe (10am-2pm)

· Friday, February 24 – Booths, Knutsford (10am-2pm)

· Tuesday, February 28 – Ashfields Health Centre, Sandach (9.30am-12.30pm)

Council environmental protection team prosecutes Crewe couple

 

Cheshire East Council brought about a successful prosecution against a married couple from Crewe on Friday (February 17).

Steven and Violet Roberts were convicted for failing to comply with a Cheshire East Council notice to clear their property of rats.

On June 2, 2011, the pair were served with a statutory notice under the Public Health Act 1936 which required them to take steps to clear 4 Lawton Street of rubbish and to treat the vermin infestation.

The pair were found guilty at South Cheshire Magistrates Court of taking very little action to adhere to this notice and were told to pay more than £850.

Mrs Roberts pleaded guilty in writing to the court but Mr Roberts was found guilty in his absence.

Mrs Roberts was fined £116 and Mr Roberts £175. Both also received victim surcharges of £15 each and costs of £266 each.

If the notice is not adhered to, Cheshire East Council’s environmental protection team will be contacting the couple to request compliance with their original notice.

Councillor signs up to the Bookstart Pledge – will you?

 

Cheshire East Councillor David Brown today gave his support to the largest book-reading programme in the world.

The Cabinet member with responsibility for performance and capacity has signed up to the Bookstart Pledge – promising to read 20 books to children in 2012.

The campaign, which this year celebrates its 20th Anniversary, asks families to share books with each other and encourage children to read.

Councillor Brown said: “I was more than happy to sign up for the Bookstart Pledge and I will be encouraging my fellow councillors to do the same. Whether you are a parent, an auntie, uncle, friend or grandparent – like me – it’s vital we share books with children.

“The importance of having good reading skills and enjoying books cannot be underestimated; reading boosts knowledge, understanding and encourages an active imagination.

“Most importantly, the Bookstart Pledge is about having fun and spending time with your loved ones. Our libraries offer a wealth of reading material on all manner of topics – our staff are looking forward to helping families pick their 20 books over the coming months.”

All Cheshire East Council’s libraries will have information on how to sign up for the Bookstart Pledge. All those who sign up will be given a special postcard to fill in, which also includes a free bookmark.

The Bookstart campaign has attracted a host of famous authors, who have also made the pledge. They include Tracy Beaker author, Jacqueline Wilson and the author of War Horse, Michael Morpurgo. Newsnight presenter, Kirsty Wark and star of the TV series Outnumbered, Hugh Dennis, have also signed the Bookstart Pledge.

11,000 people have had their say – now have YOURS

 

With just a week before the deadline, Cheshire East Council is urging Crewe residents not to lose their chance to vote on a vital ballot.

People have been asked if they want a single town council in Crewe and more than 11,000 votes have been received by the Council to date.

The deadline to vote is 5pm on Wednesday, February 29 and is open to all registered voters in the unparished areas of Crewe.

Councillor Michael Jones, Cabinet member with responsibility for resources, said: “This is a very important time for Crewe, as the outcome will send a clear message to Cheshire East Council about how they would like to see the town governed going forward.

“Any decision will affect all of the town’s people and I urge everyone to make their views known and return their ballot papers without delay.”

If a town council is established, the people of Crewe will have more local representation, similar to all other areas of Cheshire East, with the exception of Macclesfield.

It could take responsibility for local services and assets, such as Crewe Market Hall, and take a leading role in shaping its future.

The people of Crewe have a choice, but if the result of the ballot is ‘no’, they will stay pay for local services in the form of a special expense levy from April 2013.

Tuesday, 21 February 2012

MP’s 112th report

Edward Timpson MP

Monday 20, February 2012

Welcome ...

Welcome to this my 112th news bulletin.

I recently spent two more days working in Leighton Hospital to experience the day-to-day work of employees at all levels on the 9th and 10th of February. You can read more below.

DAY 3

Apart from slicing the top of my thumb off on a shoe repairing machine when aged 18 (as well as watching the odd episode of Holby City), I have never had cause to see what goes on in an operating theatre. As I change into my green scrubs, white croc-like shoes and disposable head bandana, I feel hugely unprepared for the experience.

To break me in gently, two nurses, with over fifty years service between them, guide me round an empty theatre, one of six on the same corridor. Accessed through the anaesthetic room, the theatre is much smaller than I imagined, partly due to them having never being altered since the hospital was built at a time 40 years ago when the recommended size of each theatre was significantly less than today.

Although much of the equipment, including the ventilating machine and lighting, are state of the art, I am convinced from what I see that the support I have given to the recent bid made by the hospital trust to the Department of Health for funding to build brand new operating theatres is well founded.

Later on in the day, a quick tour of the treatment centre, opened by the Duke of York in 2005, and its four modern theatres, gives an idea of what the main theatres could be like in a few years time.

We view a theatre in use where a patient's blocked artery is being operated on. There are ten clinical staff in the room, eight to perform the procedure and two student nurses observing as part of their training. Each theatre has a daily list of operations to get through which often means them having to work through lunch to avoid falling behind. This particular procedure should normally take up to two hours, but unforseen complications mean it could take twice as long.

Despite the pressurised environment, there is a sense of calm amongst the staff which helps steady my constitution. As we head back out into the corridor, a bed rushes past on its way to the 24/7 emergency theatre, a reminder that the hospital can only control so much of its work.

Next it is down to the Sterile Services Department to discover where the instruments used in each operation are cleaned for re-use. With
47,000 trays having to be sterilised each year, and with between 5 and
95 separate and specific items on each tray, it is a mammoth and massively important task.

The whole area is divided into "dirty" and "clean" to avoid contamination. To wash, check by hand, re-pack and sterilize an individual item takes about 3 hours. The staff I meet (including Jane Harrison, who I promised to mention!) are clearly proud of what they do and rightly feel it would be good for others working on site to come and see it for themselves, so that they can really appreciate what happens behind the dirty door.

Like every other hospital, Leighton is not perfect. As the local MP, I receive complaints about the hospital from local residents.

Despite best endeavours, mistakes happen. The quality of care can on occasion fall short. In referring on constituent's concerns, I trust that lessons are learnt and practices improved where needed.

To understand that process more fully I head to PALS (Patient Advice and Liaison Service), where I learn that the top concern raised is around communication. Accurate, timely and consistent information is crucial in the delivery of any professional service, but I suspect for patients and relatives in contact with a hospital it is even more so.
By dealing with as many complaints as possible face to face, the hospital hopes for more acceptable outcomes and a better understanding of how to avoid the same situation happening again.

DAY 4

It's not every day you go searching for gonorreah. I am in the sexual health clinic that was built in 2008, looking through a microscope at samples on slides in an effort to detect evidence of this sexually transmitted disease.

I am told that gonorreah is on the rise in our area, along with syphillis and HIV. In 2011 the clinic saw over 11,000 patients, 10% up on 2010, and today is proving to be another busy morning. Its good to see some young adults of both sexes in the waiting area taking their sexual health seriously.

I move on to the maternity ward, and am standing in the delivery room where my first child Sam was born almost exactly 8 years ago. I recognise the room instantly and feel quite emotional. I then learn that, with a £1million revamp of the ward happening very soon, this is my last chance to view the scene of my son's birth.

The revamp will bring in a midwife-led delivery area, which I applaud, as well as, amongst other things, better waiting facilities for nervous nail-biting dads to be. Before leaving I meet Helen, a midwife who, despite delivering hundreds, if not thousands, of babies, recalls bringing our youngest Lydia into the world four years ago. What a memory!

Upstairs I visit the neonatal ward where Sam spent his first few days after suffering some post-birth trauma. As with much of the hospital estate, this is another ward that is in real need of structural modernisation. It is quite cramped, and for anxious new parents it lacks flexibility around privacy.

What it lacks in environment it makes for with concentrated, round the clock care. The new born babies in their incubators are all surrounded by banks of sophisticated monitoring machines that dominate the room.
I remember well the amazing care Sam received whilst in the Special Care Baby Unit and am delighted to have been asked to be patron of the One in Eleven charity (so named because one in eleven babies born in Mid Cheshire requires some form of additional support) set up to help raise a million pounds for a new neonatal unit at Leighton.

With a six figure sum already pledged, the campaign is well on the way. Anyone who wants to find out more and/or donate can go to http://www.mchcharity.co.uk/p/85/One_in_Eleven_Appeal.

At the Krishnan Chandran Children's Centre, young outpatients come to the hospital for treatment from one of the paediatric consultants. In reception there are babes in arms right up to teenagers waiting for their appointment. I discover that there has been a steady rise in the number of children suffering from allergies such as nut and celiac, as well as diabetes type 1.

The Child and Adolescent Unit is like a hospital within a hospital.
With 435 admissions in January alone, staff have to be prepared to deal with all medical eventualities that for adults are spread across the whole estate. The average stay is just 1.6 days, but for some children there can be long and frequent periods spent on the ward. As I walk the long main corridor it is hard not to be touched by some of the vulnerable but brave faces I see looking back at me.

My time at Leighton is coming to an end. I began my stay by believing that 4 days would be ample for me to cover the length and breadth of hospital life. I come away feeling 40 days would not be enough.

Intensive care, the renal unit, x-ray, ENT, audiology, cardiology, the Macmillan cancer unit, the Breast Care unit, the list of places still to see is substantial. I realise that I can only write about what I have experienced in the short time spent at the bospital, and other people's experiences may differ.

One thing I can be sure about is that it is not an experience I will easily discard, and have already fed back to senior management my observations and thoughts, both critical and complimentary.

Working in a hospital is tough but rewarding in so many ways. My huge thanks and appreciation go to all those who made my self-inflicted "back to the floor" adventure so memorable. I suspect I will be back again. You have been warned.

Please remember, you can always contact me directly if you have any questions for me.

You can forward the bulletin on to your friends and family, who can sign up themselves by clicking here for my website.

Best wishes 

Edward Timpson
Member of Parliament for Crewe & Nantwich

back to top

Westminster Report

Main Content Inline Smalls

Read my most recent Westminster Report

Click here or on the image

back to top

Photos & Video ...

Main Content Inline Small

Edward Opening the Improved Crewe Library

You can view all my photos and video at edwardtimpsonmp.com

back to top

Community News

Main Content Inline Small

Community & Voluntary Services Cheshire East

Looking to find opportunities to help out in the community? CVS (Community & Voluntary Services) Cheshire East is a Registered Charity whose aim is to be valued as the leading support and development organisation for the Voluntary and Community Sector in Cheshire East.

The CVS's volunteer  team can support you in several ways:

  • Help you to find a suitable volunteer role
  • Help organisations to find suitable volunteers
  • Encourage best practice in volunteer management
  • To promote volunteering and the added value that it brings to our community

To find out more visit their website by clicking here
Do you have community news to share? Email me and it could be here too!

back to top

Crewe gypsy site campaigners say they have concrete evidence of plan's flaws

Crewe Chronicle

CAMPAIGNERS against the council’s proposed Gypsy site in Crewe say they’ve found concrete evidence the plan is ‘seriously flawed’.

They believe they have come up with a ‘defining document’ to suggest the Parkers Road site is too small for its intended purpose, and could end up putting tenants’ lives at risk.

Members of Crewe Against Traveller’s Sites (CATS) are once again urging the council to withdraw the plans immediately.

Aided by Government guidance on good design practice for Gypsy sites, the document centres on the site’s unsuitability to house 10 pitches and an amenity block.

It states: “Using measurements on the plans, the pitch for each static is only seven metres long. Government guidance states the site should be capable of providing sufficient space for the average-size trailer of up to 15m.

“Thus, the pitches are of insufficient size to accommodate the average-size static caravan.”

Concerns are also raised surrounding the accessibility for the emergency services.

The plans show the site road is only 4.5m wide, meaning emergency vehicles would struggle to pass to reach some pitches.

The document concludes: “The Parkers Road site is by far the smallest of all proposed sites. We believe the assessment of alternative sites was a sham.”

Chairman of CATS Glenn Perris said: “We believe this is a defining document as to the serious flaws within the planning application.

“The overriding factor is that this site is too small for its intended purpose, to the point that tenants’ safety could be compromised.

“It’s now time for Cheshire East to stop its arrogant march on the good people of Crewe and bring a halt to this ill-thought out proposal. The taxpayer is seeing their money being wasted on a scheme that simply isn’t fit for purpose.”

Edward Timpson MP added: “This is a fascinating and devastating technical deconstruction of a flawed planning application.

“This is clearly the wrong location, and the council should ensure the plan is shelved as soon as possible for the good of my constituents.”

The council has always maintained the site is the most suitable location and submitted a planning application on January 18.

The plans are due to be discussed at the next meeting of full council on February 23.

To view and comment on the application visit www.cheshireeast.gov.uk.

back to top

Official re-opening of Crewe Library

Cheshire East Council

MP Edward Timpson was joined by a host of Cheshire East Councillors for the official re-opening of Crewe Library on Saturday, February 3.

The Crewe MP was welcomed by staff and members from the local authority, following a recent refurbishment programme.

The library was partially closed over the Christmas and New Year period, with improvements made to many aspects of the well-used facility.

Self-service terminals, a new cafe area and a bigger children’s library are just some of the improvements library-users can look forward to.

New shelving, carpets, ceiling panels and energy-efficient lights have also been installed.

Cheshire East Councillor David Brown, Cabinet member with performance and capacity said:

“Here at Cheshire East Council, we recognise the importance of our libraries; they are no longer simply a place to borrow books, they are a place to find information, use the internet and to meet people.
“I would like to thank Edward Timpson for his support and all the staff who have worked so hard to keep the library up and running through the refurbishment.

“I hope that the improvements are welcomed by the local community and it encourages more people to use this much-loved library.”

back to top

Edward Timpson backs work of still birth and neonatal charity

Crewe Chronicle

SANDS, the stillbirth and neonatal death charity, believes as many as 1,200 stillbirths every year in the UK could be avoided.

Edward Timpson MP has attended a parliamentary reception in the House of Commons organised by Sands for the launch of its new report, Preventing Babies’ Deaths: what needs to be done.

About 6,500 babies are stillborn or die shortly after birth every year in the UK.

The charity’s report proposes that hundreds of babies’ lives could be saved every year through a combination of more research, better care and greater awareness of the risks of stillbirth and newborn baby death.

Mr Timpson said: “I was shocked to discover the scale of baby deaths in the UK. 17 babies are stillborn or die shortly after birth every day, with stillbirth being the largest contributor to child deaths under the age of five years.

“These deaths have a devastating impact on parents and their families, and I fully support Sands in their call for urgent action to prevent baby deaths in the future.”

The report highlights that advances in neonatal medicine have led to small but welcome reductions in the number of newborn babies dying.

However, Sands remains extremely concerned by the UK’s persistently high stillbirth rates – stillbirth numbers in the UK are the same today as they were in the late 1990s, with one in 200 babies being stillborn.

The UK has one of the highest stillbirth rates when compared to similar high income countries, yet Sands strongly believes that with the appropriate commitment and investment in research and improved care, a reduction in these rates is achievable and should be a key focus for all those concerned with maternity services.

┼áNeal Long, chief executive of Sands, addressed MPs and said: “A third of stillborn babies – about 1,200 babies – are perfectly formed and born at gestations when they might safely be delivered.

“But routine antenatal care is failing to detect far too many babies who need help.

“These babies’ deaths are those that Sands, researchers and clinicians working in obstetrics, believe are avoidable deaths.

“We want lives saved and families spared the desperate heartbreak of losing their precious baby.”

back to top

5 ways to contact Edward Timpson

back to top

APPEAL FOR SWIMMING VOLUNTEERS

 

Seahorse Swimming Club, based at Crewe swimming baths is appealing for new volunteers to help youngsters with disabilities to become confident in the water and learn to swim. The long established swimming club relies on volunteers for it to function as many of the swimmers need one to one help.

“We are not necessarily looking for people who are strong swimmers. We want people of all ages who are patient, caring and get satisfaction from helping younger people. It’s extremely rewarding as the volunteers gain valuable experience and learn new skills, which can be helpful when looking for certain types of careers, or to simply feel good about themselves.” - Gareth Roberts - secretary

The Club meets every Thursday evening 7.00pm - 8.00pm

For more information please contact the Club Secretary, Gareth Roberts on 01270 629958

Saturday, 18 February 2012

West St Dentist moved after over 40 years

DSCF4555

Above left to right Sally Halls Nurse, Mr J Hibbert BDS VU Manc Dentist, and Lesley Patton Receptionist

There has been a dentist in West St near the post office for well over 40 years but now the practice has  moved. The problem with West St was it was an old house with steep stairs so they couldn't take disabled patients or old people who couldn't climb the stairs. Existing patients are reminded that the surgery is at the new location.

DSCF4557

The practice has now moved to Eagle Bridge with its own entrance. The new surgery is like Star Trek with the latest equipment and they can now take all patients. They have vacancies' for new patients and a new member of staff will join soon who is a therapist giving them room to provide even more services. A therapist is higher qualified than a hygienist and can carry out other work.

The phone number remains the same 01270-214949 so if you need a Dentist give Lesley a call they do accept NHS patients

Plan to prevent flooding in Willaston is welcomed.

 

Willaston and Rope Borough Councillor Brian Silvester has welcomed planned  drainage works for Coppice Road and Wistaston Road in Willaston.

Councillor Silvester said, "The existing drainage between 51 to 142 Wistaston Road and 1 to 45 Coppice Road has insufficient capacity (existing drain is 4 inch land tile). A new drain was installed in the early nineties but due to various reasons the scheme was cut short and did not address the issue fully.

During/after heavy rain fall, water accumulates on the highway and is unable to drain away, causing localised flooding to properties.

The proposal will see a new drainage system constructed in Coppice Rd/Wistaston Rd that will connect to the previously constructed drain that discharges into the open water course at Wells Green.

Funding has been arranged over two years from the Environment Agency and the Cheshire East Council with £100k allocated for 2013/14 and a further £75k in 2014/15. The works will be undertaken by the Council.

The Parish Council and I have been pressing for several years for action to be taken and I am very pleased that action is going to be taken, starting next year. Hopefully if there is slippage in the programme elsewhere the scheme can be brought forward.The sooner it is done the better. The residents in that area have had to put up with this problem for far too long."

Man fined for attack on Council parking officer

 

A man has been fined and given penalty points for an attack on a Cheshire East Council parking enforcement officer.

The court heard how the officer was knocked to the ground by a vehicle being driven by Diquyen Trinh (correct spelling).

The officer, who does not wish to be named, suffered a broken wrist and shoulder injuries.

The incident occurred in August last year.

Appearing before South Cheshire Magistrates on Thursday, February 9, the 39-year-old was convicted of driving without due care and attention, leaving the scene of an accident and failing to report an accident.

He was given eight penalty points on his driving licence and fined £1,590 in fines and court costs.

Cheshire East Councillor Rod Menlove, Cabinet member with responsibility for environmental services, said: “Attacks on members of Cheshire East Council staff are totally unacceptable. Verbal or physical abuse of those who are merely trying to carry out their duties for the council will not be tolerated.

“People who think it is acceptable to behave in such a manner should be under no illusion that we will contact the police and their actions will be dealt with as the law sees fit.

“All Cheshire East Council staff should be able to do their job in relative safety, without fear of this kind of behaviour from the public.”

Wednesday, 15 February 2012

Police seek missing man from Crewe

 

Police are appealing for help from the public in tracing a man reported missing from his home in Crewe.

Christopher Helme (47), was reported missing by family members from their home in Betjemen Way, yesterday evening. He left the house on foot and has no access to a car, although he can drive.
He is described as around 5′8"and of medium build to large build, with short cropped hair which is greying round the sides.

He was last seen wearing blue jeans, a three quarter length jacket and grey/blue Marks and Spencer fleece. He was also wearing a scarf and brown leather shoes.

Inspector Steve Griffiths, who is overseeing the investigation into Christopher′s whereabouts, said: "His family haven′t seen him since 11am yesterday and are very worried about him.

"We are very concerned for Christopher′s welfare and urge anyone who may have seen him today or knows of his recent or current whereabouts to contact us.

"I would also appeal to Christopher directly to make contact with his family or Cheshire Police on 101 quoting incident 814 of 14 February 2012."

Cheshire to boost data protection measures after breach

 

Cheshire East Council has made improvements to the way it handles sensitive information, after being fined by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) for a breach of the Data Protection Act.

The Council reported the breach to the ICO following an incident in May 2011, where an email containing sensitive personal information was sent to a wider audience than intended or anticipated. Officers reported the matter to the ICO as soon as they became aware.

An apology has now been issued to the person affected and Cheshire East Council has taken all the necessary steps to ensure that this does not happen again in this or any other case.

Cheshire East Council will now have to pay a £64,000 penalty for the breach following their investigation. This represents 80 per cent of the whole fine, which is significantly reduced to encourage early payment.

The ICO found that the Council did indeed have a responsibility to distribute the information to its partner agencies but that the correct procedures had not been followed.

Cabinet Member with responsibility for performance and capacity, Councillor David Brown said: “Data protection is an issue that the Council takes very seriously.

“This incident has prompted us to scrutinise our policies and procedures very carefully to make sure that this never happens again.

“Staff will be receiving extra training and support in this area and all staff are being urged to remain extremely vigilant with the way sensitive information is handled and distributed.”

CEC lobbying Government

 

Cheshire East Council is lobbying the Government for a fairer slice of Business Rates.

At the moment, the authority receives in the Formula Grant only 44 per cent of the rates it collects. The remainder remains with the Government.

Cabinet member with responsibility for resources Councillor Michael Jones said: “Cheshire East is fortunate in that it has, compared with many areas, a strong business community. As a result, the total amount of business rates we collect, on behalf on the Government, is very high.

“Unfortunately, the current method of calculating what authorities should keep means that Cheshire East receives only 44 per cent – one of the lowest proportions in the whole of the country. The remainder is used by the Government, among other things, to bolster authorities with less-thriving business communities.”

New methods of calculation around how much money a council can keep are not set to help either. The Government wants to see local authorities have greater control over their money, enabling them to plan better for the future. It also wants to see a stronger link between councils and their local businesses to create conditions that generate growth.

Councillor Jones continued: “I applaud fully and support entirely what the Government is trying to achieve. It is right that we should a greater say over our finance. We already have a strong productive relationship with our business communities and continually strive to create conditions for growth. However that takes money and that is something that this Council has not got.

“The amount of Business Rates collected by Cheshire East Council is sufficient to fund Formula Grant for the Council, Cheshire Police Authority and Cheshire Fire Authority as well as all Department of Work and Pensions and Department for Education grants to the Council. And this is still likely to leave a surplus in the region of £9m.

“Unfortunately, unless something is done, the money will continue to go to those authorities who are seen as needing it and the money will continue to come from authorities like Cheshire East.”

Fantastic response on Crewe town council ballot

 

More than 8,800 people have so far voted on the ballot for a town council in Crewe.

Residents have until February 29 to vote on whether they want a town council or not but the encouraging response has delighted Cheshire East Council. Ballot papers ask the direct question – ‘Do you want a single town council for Crewe?’

Cheshire East is urging all residents in Crewe to vote on this important topic, as the outcome will have a significant impact on the town’s future.

If a town council is established, the people of Crewe will have more local representation, similar to all other areas of Cheshire East, with the exception of Macclesfield.

It could take responsibility for local services and assets, such as Crewe Market Hall, and take a leading role in shaping its future.

If the result of the ballot is ‘no’, a special expense levy will be introduced in Crewe in April 2013. This will, more or less, pay for the services which a town council would have provided.

Councillor Michael Jones, Cabinet member with responsibility for resources, said: “I am extremely delighted with the response we have had so far and it shows the people of Crewe are taking a keen interest in this important matter.

“If Crewe had a town council, certain assets could be transferred to that authority, which would be better placed to manage them going forward. This is because local people know more about what their local community wants. A town council would give the people a voice in how the town centre develops.

“Without a town council, there is a real danger that such valued public facilities like town halls, market halls, allotments and other conveniences could be lost. Cheshire East Council does not wish to see this happen.”

He added: “In these austere economic times, Cheshire East can no longer support subsidised activities in unparished areas like Crewe if it is going to affect such vital services as providing help and support for children and adults in Cheshire East.”

Transfer and devolution of assets is a Cheshire East Council policy, which is in line with the Government’s localism agenda.

Completed ballot papers must be returned by no later than 5pm on February 29.

More information on other options for localised governance, in addition to a town council, with a breakdown of the facts on each, is available at: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/crewegovreview

A printed version of this information is also available to pick up from the Municipal Buildings, Delamere House and Crewe Library.

For more information, residents can email: communitygovernancereview@cheshireeast.gov.uk

Alternatively, write to Registration Service and Business Manager, Democratic Services, Cheshire East Council, Westfields, Sandbach, Cheshire, CW11 1HZ.

Sandbach man who terrorised a community is served ASBO

 

A 21 year old man who flouted his pubwatch ban and was often abusive and aggressive to anyone who got in his way has been slapped with an ASBO after the community joined together to fight back.

South Cheshire Magistrates Court handed down the ASBO to Matthew Foran from Coleridge Close in Ettiley Heath on 13 February 2012. The order, which bans him from licensed premises in Sandbach and Middlewich, limits his freedom and enforces "reasonable" behaviour, is valid until 12 February 2014.

Foran was an ongoing problem for pubs in Sandbach and Middlewich with windows being smashed, staff threatened or intimidated and property broken. Other customers were disturbed by his behaviour making them uneasy when they should have been enjoying their evening out.

He also intimidated and made the lives of those living near him a misery with threats, abusive gestures, loud music and criminal damage an ongoing problem.

Anyone who came into contact with Foran would often be subjected to his severe anti-social behaviour exacerbated by his belief that no one could touch him. In some cases witnesses were too scared to come forward to help make successful convictions against him.

His continuous disregard for the law and his Pubwatch ban combined with his abhorrent behaviour towards others, led to Sandbach Neighbourhood Policing Team officers joining forces with Safer East Cheshire Partnership to empower the community to stop the abuse.

The teams put together a painstaking catalogue of evidence with the help of Cheshire Police′s Force solicitors who turned it into a document that would convince magistrates this man was a danger to the community and needed an ASBO to curtail his depraved behaviour.

Congleton Neighbourhood Policing Inspector Mark Gammage said: "Foran mistakenly believed he could cause misery to residents and businesses in Sandbach without consequence.
"In the last six months my officers have been called out to deal with his aggressive and intimidating behaviour 24 times. He′s smashed windows, threatened people, and subjected numerous people to violence and abuse.
"I′d like to thank those people who have taken a stand against his yobbish behaviour and supported us in obtaining this ASBO - its when communities stand up and say "Enough is enough" that we can make a real difference.
"If he does step out of line he is likely to find himself in prison. Anyone who sees Foran breaching his ASBO conditions should contact police on 101. Alternatively information can be given on anonymously via Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111."

The ASBO Prohibits FORAN from:

1 Entering any premises (including beer gardens and outdoor areas attached to those licensed premises and any premises that is licensed to sell alcohol which can then be consumed on those premises) within the Sandbach and Middlewich Neighbourhood Policing areas.

2 Entering the areas shaded on maps 3 and 4 (Sandbach and Middlewich town centres) between 8pm and 7am daily, unless for the purpose of travelling through without stopping, either as a driver or passenger of a motor vehicle.

3 Using foul, abusive, insulting, offensive, threatening, disorderly or intimidating language or displaying such behaviour in any public place.

4 Whilst in Coleridge Close, Sandbach, FORAN is prohibited from causing any noise nuisance likely to cause a reasonable person in the vicinity harassment, alarm or distress, that includes the playing of loud music, shouting or singing.

Police hunt Crewe metal thieves

 

Police are appealing for witnesses following the theft of metal from a construction site in Rose Terrace, in Crewe.

Some time between 5pm on 6 February 2012 and 7am 7 February 2012 boilers and copper pipes were stolen from three flats.

They also removed seven taps from the premises.

PC Jayne Lloyd said: "We are appealing to anyone who may have seen people and vehicles acting suspiciously in or near to Rose Terrace to get in touch.

"At the time you may have thought nothing of it to see vans near a building site but we would urge you to contact us with any information especially as they would have been there after dark.

"We would also appeal to scrap metal dealers in the area, especially those signed up to our scheme to stamp out metal theft in the area, to be vigilant and report any suspicious activity or transactions to police."

Anyone with information should contact PC Jayne Lloyd on 101 quoting incidne 297 of 7 February 2012. Alternatively information can be given anonymously on the Crimestoppers number 0800 555 111.

Grit box provided and lights repaired.

 

After a complaint from a constituent Councillor Brian Silvester has  taken action to have a grit bin provided and lights repaired  on and around the Foot/Cycle Bridge crossing the A500 in Willaston. Councillor Silvester said," At this time of year the footbridge does get very icy and is dangerous for users. I am grateful to the Cheshire East Council for providing the grit box and repairing the lights. I am pleased that local users have offered to spread the grit when necessary.( See below) Pedestrians and cyclists will now be able to use the bridge safely."

Willaston Grant Award Welcomed

Willaston Borough Councillor, Brian Silvester has welcomed a grant for £300 from Cheshire East Council for the Willaston Community Opportunities Group(COG). Councillor Silvester said," The application was for the design and printing of the final two local walk leaflets in a series of three, the first being funded by their Parish Plan Implementation Grant.   The total cost of the project was £500.  The Group had no funds of their own but had raised £200 in sponsorship.  They had requested £300 and this was awarded in full. The first walk leaflet was very successful and led to many local people and visitors putting on their walking boots, which is a very healthy form of recreation. The Willaston Community Opportunities Group do excellent work and I am very pleased that their efforts are receiving external support."

International womens week

 

International Women′s week takes place the first week in March (week commencing 5th), with International Women′s Day being on the 8th March. Annually on this day, thousands of events are held all over the world to inspire women and celebrate their achievements.

The theme for this year′s event is ‘Connecting Women and Inspiring Girls′, and this year Cheshire Constabulary will be holding various events around the county to celebrate International Women′s Week.

Assistant Chief Constable Janette McCormick said: "The Constabulary is very pleased again to be supporting International Women′s Week. This year not only is it celebrating the success of women both in the community and work place, but it is focussing on ′connecting women′.

"The Neighbourhood Teams play a huge part in this across Cheshire, bringing people together to support their local areas as well as policing.

"The Neighbourhood Policing Teams are engaged with many women′s groups and they see at first hand the strength such networks can be. The work Inspector Catherine Mitchell has done with the SHAPLA Women Group is just one example of this. Enabling young women to connect with role models in the community is the aim of Big Sister in place in Crewe and now Chester.

"The drive and commitment of some very talented female officers has been the success to many of these programme. This year the Neighbourhood Teams are coordinating events across all the three areas to connect groups together as well as form even stronger relationships with the Neighbourhoods."

Information about the events that are taking place around Cheshire will be advertised on the Cheshire Police website next week.

Exciting proposals for Tatton Park

 

Bure Valley Adventures Ltd , working with Cheshire East Council,  is delighted to announce the first stages of a public consultation process for BeWILDerwood, an exciting new outdoor adventure park.

BeWILDerwood is an award-winning attraction currently operating in the heart of the Norfolk Broads, which is run by the company.

The company, working through their planning consultants have been liaising with the Council and Tatton Park to bring the BeWILDerwood concept to the North West’s premier estate.  Tatton Park was identified by them as their preferred location for a similar adventure park.

A public exhibition, which anyone can attend, will start on February 23 at the Verandah Suite at the Cotton’s Hotel, in Manchester Road, Knutsford. This will start at 12noon and end at 8pm. The exhibition will then move to Tatton Park for a further two weeks. The public exhibition is being organised by Bidwells, property consultants, of Norfolk, on behalf of Bure Valley Adventures Ltd.

Full details will also be available online at www.BeWILDerwoodTatton.co.uk

The exhibition will provide more details about the proposal and allow residents’ views on the emerging design to be considered before the application is finalised and submitted to the Council.

Cheshire East Council Cabinet member with responsibility for prosperity, Councillor Jamie Macrae said: “This proposal is a huge part of Cheshire East Council’s ambitious plans for the Tatton Vision.

“Tatton Park is already the premier major attraction in the region with more than 800,000 visitors a year. Our vision is to realise its full potential at national level and raise the visitor to over 1,000,000 visitors a year  By working closely with this prestigious company, we are showing our real commitment to improving the facilities and enhancing the whole visitor experience. In turn, this will bring a major boost to the local and regional economy and provide jobs for local people. “

Cheshire East Council moves to boost jobs and regeneration in Nantwich

 

Cheshire East Council has this week announced that it plans to carry out site investigatory work on its land off St Anne’s Lane, Nantwich.

The aim of the investigation is to identify options for developing the site, a former town gas works, which is currently not used by the Council.

Tenders for the work are being invited and by the end of the month, a timetable of work will be available. This will be published around the site.

Once work starts, the site will need to be closed and there will be no access for vehicles, including cycles or pedestrians. However, an alternative cycle and pedestrian route has been identified and copies of this route will be posted at key locations around the site and Mill Island. Access to Mill Island will still be available via Queen’s Drive.

The investigatory work will involve creating holes in various locations throughout the site. This needs to be done so that samples can be taken and the ground can be monitored. In the 1980s, some structures were demolished and some remedial work to the land was carried out. The site investigation will identify whether anything further is required.

The majority of the holes will be refilled once work is finished. Some will need further monitoring and these will be identified clearly and secured.

Cabinet member with responsibility for prosperity Councillor Jamie Macrae said: “Local ward members have asked the Council to look at options for developing this key town centre site with a view to it contributing to the regeneration and continued economic growth of Nantwich.

“We will look to opening up the site for the duration of the Nantwich Jazz Festival between 7am April 4 and midnight April 10. If further work is still required, the site will be closed immediately afterwards.”

Nantwich Mayor and local ward member Councillor Arthur Moran said: “This brownfield land is one of the last prime development sites in the town centre.

“It is most likely that we will be looking to create a good-quality, mixed development that will enhance the waterfront area of the River Weaver. So it is vital that this investigatory work is done, to ensure that the land is suitable for development.”

Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe

Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe – winter what’s on guide

Throughout the winter, Cheshire East Council and its partner agencies in the Adult Safeguarding Board have been providing information and key contact numbers as part of its Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe campaign. This is intended to assist, reassure and empower its most vulnerable people by providing information at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/winter and through the local media.

You don’t have to stay at home to keep warm, well and safe this winter.

A vast array of activities are on offer to people of all ages throughout Cheshire East and now might be the best time to take advantage.

From Tai Chi to coffee mornings, Pilates lessons to senior citizens’ lunches, there is plenty to do.

And they can be enjoyed in warm, safe environments where people can socialise and make new friends.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cabinet member with responsibility for health and wellbeing, said: “We may all feel less inclined to get out and about when the weather is cold but, following a short journey, there are a lot of activities which people can get involved in across all our towns and villages.

“Many are free of charge and some are available at a small price. Also, our health improvement team run a variety of programmes in partnership with Age UK and housing associations.

“These sessions provide a social opportunity to restore confidence, maintain independence, reduce falls and improve mobility, strength, balance and flexibility.”

Derek Thomas, the independent chair of the Cheshire East Adult Safeguarding Board, added: “Most of us can now expect to live very much longer than our parents did and this provides opportunities to extend our contribution to family and community life, and this could be as carers, grandparents or volunteers.

“But to do this we need to keep ourselves as fit, alert and healthy as possible, particularly during the cold, dark winter months. The Adult Safeguarding Board therefore welcomes the efforts of the Council to publicise the wide variety of voluntary and private sector programmes available to Cheshire East citizens.

“Unfortunately, many older people are also victims of various forms of abuse, often in their own homes. The more social contact they have outside, the greater the opportunities for them to seek advice and support.”

Congleton Library is hosting a free ancestry taster-session at 2pm on Friday (February 17), followed by a coffee morning the next day in the library meeting room, which costs 60p.

Adults can put their best feet forward with English country dancing sessions which run in Adlington Village Hall, near Macclesfield, until February 27, and weekly free meditation classes are on offer at The MedShed in Elworth, near Sandbach, on Tuesdays at 8pm.

Many more activities, including the popular Be Steady, Be Safe classes which are designed to improve leg strength and balance in older people, can be searched in Cheshire East’s comprehensive guide of things to do at whatson.cheshireeast.gov.uk

For more information, call 01270 685794.

Meanwhile, more helpful advice and information on the Stay Warm, Stay Well, Stay Safe campaign can be obtained at the following road show events:

· Friday, February 17 – Grosvenor Centre, Macclesfield (10am-2pm)

· Tuesday, February 21 – Ashfield Health Centre, Sandbach (9.30am-12.30pm)

· Thursday, February 23 – ASDA, Crewe (10am-2pm)

· Friday, February 24 – Booths, Knutsford (10am-2pm)

MP’s 111th news bulletin

 

Edward Timpson MP

Saturday 11, February 2012

Welcome ...

Welcome to this my 111th news bulletin.

This week marked National Apprenticeship Week – a celebration of apprenticeships and how they are helping to shape our workplaces.  Apprenticeships are about learning on the job, not sitting in a classroom but getting out into the workplace and learning a new trade.

Who knows where an apprenticeship may lead, the likes of Jamie Oliver; the Formula One engineer Ross Brawn and Eric Clapton all started out as apprentices. Up and down the country hundreds of thousands of young people are following in their footsteps and realising the life-changing opportunity becoming an apprentice affords.

Here in Crewe and Nantwich we gained 550 new apprentices last year, an increase of 80.9%. And we are not alone: across the country there was a 63 per cent increase as 450,000 people started an apprenticeship last year.  With yet more investment by the Government we are sure to see this number rise.

This week David Cameron announced businesses and training providers can bid for a share of the £6m Higher Apprenticeship Fund, which will support the development of new Higher Apprenticeships in sectors including aerospace, energy and renewable technologies.  An additional £250m will be available to businesses to boost skills in their workplace.

So why do I think more people from Crewe and Nantwich should be signing up for apprenticeships?

Many in Crewe and Nantwich may leave school and not know which way to turn. One option may be university, another to travel in a gap year or simply work. But there is another option – becoming an apprentice. And the best thing is that this option allows you to earn and learn at the same time.

The second fantastic thing about apprenticeships is the skills they provide. More and more employers are saying that graduates and school leavers do not have the tools necessary for the working world. An apprenticeship is a great way of developing a young person’s skills, of tailoring them to the workplace.

But apprenticeships are not just a win for young people. They are beneficial to small businesses, such as At One printing in Crewe, which is why the Government has launched new initiatives to encourage more firms to take on apprentices. This way they can train people to their standard and in return get loyal staff and a quick recoup of their investment. As an added incentive from today any small business in Crewe and Nantwich who hires an apprentice aged 16-24 will be eligible for £1,500.

They are a boost for our economy – every £1 of public cash invested in apprentices returns an estimated £18 to the wider economy. This is vital at a time when new jobs and growth are what’s needed when we face the biggest economic crisis any of us have known.

Apprenticeships are a win for business, a win for young people and a win for the economy – that is why I am delighted that here in Crewe and Nantwich we are adding more names to the growing list of people realising their potential through an apprenticeship.

Please remember, you can always contact me directly if you have any questions for me.

You can forward the bulletin on to your friends and family, who can sign up themselves by clicking here for my website.

Best wishes 

Edward Timpson
Member of Parliament for Crewe & Nantwich

back to top

I have recently ...

  • Attended Monday morning's assembly at Brierley Primary School to help promote Cancer Research UK's Leap into Action Day
  • Spent my last two days on Thursday and Friday working at Leighton Hospital, mucking in with staff at all levels and experiencing their day-to-day jobs, including theatre, complaints, sexual health, maternity, neonatal and paediatrics. Look out for my diary detailing my experience in the Chronicle newspaper. Also please support the "One in Eleven" fundraising campaign for a new neonatal intensive care unit (for which I am a Patron) at Leighton Hospital by visiting this link
  • Went to the Bentley Dinner to support one of our largest local employers and discuss how the company can become even more involved in supporting the local community.
  • Questioned the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg in the House of Commons about the "Protect Stapeley" campaign. Read more here

back to top

Westminster Report

Main Content Inline Smalls

Read my most recent Westminster Report

Click here or on the image

back to top

Photos & Video ...

Main Content Inline Small

Edward with staff at Leighton Hospital's Neonatal Unit

You can view all my photos and video at edwardtimpsonmp.com

back to top

Community News

Main Content Inline Small

Community & Voluntary Services Cheshire East

Looking to find opportunities to help out in the community? CVS (Community & Voluntary Services) Cheshire East is a Registered Charity whose aim is to be valued as the leading support and development organisation for the Voluntary and Community Sector in Cheshire East.

The CVS's volunteer  team can support you in several ways:

  • Help you to find a suitable volunteer role
  • Help organisations to find suitable volunteers
  • Encourage best practice in volunteer management
  • To promote volunteering and the added value that it brings to our community

To find out more visit their website by clicking here
Do you have community news to share? Email me and it could be here too!

back to top

Nantwich MP Timpson attends Koconut Grove cancer charity event

Nantwich MP Edward Timpson joined in a fund-raising event at an Indian restaurant in Shavington.

He was at The Koconut Grove Indian restaurant at The Cheshire Cheese in aid of Cancer Research UK.

A charity auction took place in the restaurant with all the proceeds from the auction and raffle being donated going to Cancer Research UK.

Mr Timpson was in attendance to hold the raffle and auction that raised a £1,406 for the charity.

The MP said: “The Koconut Grove has raised an impressive amount for a very worthwhile charity.

“I commend Sreekumar Kolangat and his staff for their generosity and congratulate all those present on making it such a successful occasion.”

Sreekumar Kolangat, chairman and managing director of 3k Enterprises, said: “We were overwhelmed by the support and help we received from our patrons.

“Koconut Grove is always happy to contribute towards charities and need to support the needs of our local community.”

back to top

Leighton Hospital in Crewe unveils revamped orthopaedic unit

Crewe Chronicle

PATIENTS with broken bones will now have access to more efficient treatment thanks to a revamp at Leighton Hospital’s orthopaedic outpatients unit.

Improved facilities include an increased amount of privacy and dignity for patients, with eight individual consultation rooms replacing the original seven curtained cubicles.

The department, which incorporates the fracture clinic, now also has a specially designed plaster room, replacing the previous facility which was located in a portable cabin adjacent to the unit.

This new plaster room has facilities to allow for four patients to be seen simultaneously.

Matron Del Owen said: “The three-month refurbishment has created a much more efficient service and pleasant environment for patients, and has greatly improved the working conditions for our staff. The new reception and waiting area is light and airy, and also features a television for patients, courtesy of the hospital’s League of Friends charity organisation.”

Edward Timpson MP was also given a tour of the new facilities. He said: “I’ve been very impressed. The people of Crewe, Nantwich and the surrounding areas will be well served by having such a valuable clinic on their doorstep.”

“How much more of our money are they prepared to waste until the application finally fails?

“We will win this campaign,” said Mr Perris.

back to top

Crewe and Nantwich MP Edward Timpson tells of his experience growing up with foster children

Crewe Chronicle

Crewe and Nantwich MP Edward Timpson grew up with foster children. He talked to reporter Belinda Ryan about his childhood and what he gained from the experience.

CREWE and Nantwich MP Edward Timpson can’t really remember a time growing up when his parents’ home wasn’t full of foster children.

Mr Timpson was only five when his mum and dad, John and Alex, began fostering.

During the 30 years they acted as foster carers, they looked after nearly 90 children.

Mr Timpson says it was this positive experience which motivated him into practising family law and taking on the position of chairman of the all-party group on fostering and adoption.

“One of the things that really motivated me to do what I’m doing now is to try to help those children who find themselves in care, through no fault of their own, to get a better life and have a better chance to make something of themselves,” said the Conservative MP.

With more than 60,000 children in care, thousands of carers are needed up and down the country.

More than 1,200 extra foster carers need to be found across the north west of England in the next 12 months, according to the Fostering Network.

Mr Timpson still bumps into people who were fostered by his parents.

During last year’s election campaign he told how he met a man at a public meeting who was about seven years younger than himself who was fostered by his parents.

“When you talk to them and find out what they’re doing now and what they’ve made of their lives, it really hits home what my parents did and how much it’s played a part in these peoples’ lives,” said Mr Timpson.

The Tory MP admits his initial reaction when he discovered his parents had started fostering wasn’t as charitable as it might have been.

“I was nearly six and I came skipping home from school one day to find these two fairly loud children, aged five and three, downstairs in the kitchen,” he said. “As the youngest of three I was used to having my mother’s undivided attention and on finding I was to have to share her my reaction was to run upstairs in a huff, run into my bedroom, slam the door and refuse to come out until they left.”

His reaction didn’t last long.

“As I grew older I started to take on more of a caring role myself, helping to do late-night bottles, that sort of thing, and I could start to see what my parents were doing it for and it was quite rewarding,” he said.

“You could see the change in many of these children. They started to thrive under routine, their personalities came out and the resentment I had at the start just evaporated.”

back to top

5 ways to contact Edward Timpson

back to top