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Wednesday, 23 September 2020

Feel good at Tatton Park this autumn


We’re at the turning point of the seasons, and entering the time of year when days are shorter than nights and the weather can make it harder to venture outside. But this year it’s more important than ever to look on the bright side and feel good about autumn. Tatton Park is the ideal place to embrace the changing season, explore the big outdoors and tune into wildlife.

Animals make us feel happy

It’s scientifically proven that being with animals boosts our mood and can reduce stress levels. Apparently our instinct to nurture and protect also endears us to cute-looking animals. The rare breed pigs, cows and chickens at Tatton Park’s Farm have produced plenty of adorable babies during spring and summer, so why not surround yourself with happiness this autumn, and see how they’re getting on?

Autumn wellbeing in Tatton Park Gardens

We’re a nation of gardeners at the best of times, and lockdown restrictions led to a surge in gardening activity across the country. Spending more time in our gardens doesn’t just keep us busy; it’s great for mental health too. A trip to Tatton Park’s Garden this autumn can help you find a sense of wellbeing and a chance to marvel at the changing leaves and layers of colour. Enjoy seasonal displays of pumpkins and other vegetables from the Walled Kitchen Gardens and trees in the Orchards laden with apples and pears. The culinary squashes are also used in seasonal dishes in the restaurants at Tatton Park.

A special event in the Gardens, from 3 October, celebrates Cheshire’s Wonderful Wildlife, with an open-air gallery of 12 artworks by Nicky Thompson, presented by the Mid Cheshire Community Rail Partnership.

At least nature is carrying on as normal in the Parkland

The natural world and its seasonal cycles are reassuringly consistent. This autumn’s deer rut and the arrival and departure of migratory birds are happening as normal at Tatton Park.

The deer rut is when red deer stags bellow and clash antlers, and fallow deer bucks posture for territory in an age-old bid to win mating rights in their herd. Please witness the thrill of this natural event from a safe distance, as the deer can behave aggressively if you venture too close.

Tatton Park’s meres are a popular stop-off point for migrating birds as they head back to Africa for the winter. They’re also a destination at this time of year for birds journeying down to escape harsher winters in Scandinavia. Look out for hobbies, redwing and fieldfare.

Adventures at Tatton Park this October half term (24 Oct – 1 Nov)*

Gallery in the Gardens (3 Oct - 15 Nov)*

Explore our Gallery in the Gardens presented by the Mid Cheshire Community Rail Partnership and local artist Nicky Thompson. Pick up a wildlife brochure and trail sheet (included with your entry ticket) and fully immerse yourself in the art trail with activities and information on wildlife found in Cheshire.

Explore 50 acres of Gardens and discover Cheshire’s Wonderful Wildlife through 1930's inspired art. Tatton’s Gardens and Parkland provide a natural habitat for a variety of wildlife, many of which you’ll learn about on the art trail. Use the map to discover all twelve illustrations including the red deer, barn owl and fox.

Fun at the Farm

Choose a pumpkin from the pumpkin patch to take home and carve. Plus you can wear your Halloween costume and hunt for Digby the dragon’s eggs throughout the farmyard. There’s even a chocolate reward at the end! (while stocks last).

Explore the Mansion

The Mansion will re-open for half term, allowing visitors a final opportunity this year to visit the opulent State Rooms, fascinating Servant’s Quarters, Japanese Garden exhibition and an exhibition of the last Lord Egerton’s personal photographs.

Adventures in the Parkland

Pick up our free Autumn Forager trail sheet from the Welcome Building and explore the sounds and sights in the Parkland this autumn.

*Tickets must be pre-booked at tattonpark.org.uk to visit the Gardens, Farm and Mansion.

Crewe gets first Covid-19 Local Testing Site


A dedicated walk-through Covid-19 testing site is to be deployed in Crewe.

The semi-permanent site, known as a Local Testing Site (LTS), is being created in Crewe and will be ready for public use from 1 October. This is one of a number of such sites being set up across Cheshire and Merseyside.

The LTS will offer bespoke walk-through appointments, to improve access for the whole community, especially those who do not have access to a car or should not be using public transport because they have symptoms.

LTSs are designed to supplement existing testing facilities such as regional and mobile testing units. Unlike mobile testing units, which are often deployed for around four days, the LTS will be open for several months to ensure that accessible testing is continually available to people within their communities.

The site is being set-up at Chester Street car park and users will be asked to self-swab when attending. Appointments must be booked in advance, no walk-up appointments will be available.

Dr Matt Tyrer, acting director of public health for Cheshire East Council, said: “We have been working very closely with colleagues in the NHS in Cheshire and Merseyside and the Department for Health and Social Care to ensure that we have the most accessible testing facilities for the people of Cheshire East, when and where they need them.

Councillor Jill Rhodes, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for public health said “I am delighted that we have been able to secure this LTS facility so our local residents and workers will have even greater access to testing should they feel unwell with Covid-19 symptoms.

Regional Testing Director for Cheshire and Merseyside, Terry Whalley, said: “This additional capacity is great for Cheshire East and the whole of Cheshire and Merseyside.

“Having more semi-permanent LTSs in Cheshire and Merseyside means that we will be able to use other testing facilities more flexibly and be able to deploy them in a more targeted way in the future. This will help the directors of public health, and other professionals, to have a greater say in how testing is used and deployed in their own area.

“Having this extra capacity, more permanently, means that we can respond and react in a much more targeted way with other testing resources, should we see local outbreaks or other urgent needs. Such decisions can now be made in the knowledge that there are more testing sites in Cheshire and Merseyside to rely on day to day.

“We will carefully study the use of these new sites as we look to roll out further testing capability across Cheshire and Merseyside in our bid to continue protecting lives and livelihoods.”

Pension fund reveals its carbon footprint


A local pension fund has become one of the first in the country to report on the carbon footprint of its £6 billion investment portfolio.

Cheshire Pension Fund has published its Climate Risk Report, which reveals that the carbon footprint of its equity investments is 30 per cent below the general market, represented by the FTSE All World Index which covers more than 3,000 companies in 47 countries.

The fund is the pension scheme for more than 100,000 members across 300 employers, including Cheshire East Council, Cheshire West and Chester, Halton and Warrington councils, Cheshire Police and Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service and a range of other employers in Cheshire. The fund is administered by Cheshire West and Chester Council.

Councillor Myles Hogg, chairman of the Cheshire Pension Fund, said: “The report confirms that the Cheshire Pension Fund has a good baseline from which to manage the risk presented to its investment portfolio from climate change.

"Our priority remains our financial duty to pay the pensions of our 100,000 members and to do this we need to ensure the assets of the fund are well diversified and resilient when faced with the impact of climate change.

“The fund has previously invested more than £500 million in a pioneering Climate Change Factor Fund and the report confirms that this decision has helped reduce the carbon emissions from our investment portfolio. 

"We understand that climate change is an important issue for our employers and members, so it is reassuring to see the difference this investment has already made to our carbon footprint.

“The fund will continue to explore what additional steps it can take to reduce investment risk through further reductions in its carbon footprint.”

The new report published by the Cheshire Pension Fund follows recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), a blueprint for climate reporting which represents best practice in the investment industry.

Its publication follows an independent and in-depth review of the climate risks of the fund’s investment portfolio.

The report shows that the fund has less exposure to companies with fossil fuel reserves and those exploiting coal reserves than the general market and reveals that it has more investment with companies who use clean technology than the general market.

The fund invests in five different equity funds and all except one have a lower carbon footprint than the general market index. The one fund with a higher carbon footprint will now be reviewed to identify potential alternative investment funds.

The publication of the report will be followed by the publication of a climate strategy and climate stewardship plan.

For more information and to see the report visit: www.cheshirepensionfund.org/ and click on news.

Cheshire Council leaders: act now to avoid local lockdown


The leaders of Cheshire East Council and Cheshire West and Chester Council are today sending a joint message to everyone across the county – if we act now, we have time to avoid a new peak in infections and a local lockdown.

In the seven days to 12 September, there were 106 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Cheshire West and 100 confirmed cases in Cheshire East, a four-fold increase on recent case numbers.

With the number of infections even higher in Merseyside, Warrington and Halton and these areas facing the prospect of greater lockdown restrictions from Tuesday 22 September, the Council leaders feel the next seven days offer a crucial opportunity to curb the number of infections if more people change their behaviour immediately.

Leader of Cheshire East Council councillor Sam Corcoran said: “There has been a rise in infections across the region during the past few weeks and this is something we need to address now to avoid increased restrictions being imposed on Cheshire.

“Covid-19 remains a real threat, even more so now that it’s right on our doorstep. Our best defence is to be rigorous about simple prevention measures – wash your hands with soap and water, don’t touch your face and maintain social distancing.

“Now is not a time to be complacent, we all must think about the consequences of our actions and carefully consider avoiding situations where we are exposed to other households and larger numbers of people for any length of time.

“I also want to stress the importance of self-isolating and booking yourself in for a test if you have symptoms.  However, we also know that testing capacity is not adequate and I, along with other council leaders, have called for increased testing capacity for Cheshire and Merseyside.”

Leader of Cheshire West and Chester Council, councillor Louise Gittins said: “Many people have been observing public health guidance since lockdown was lifted and we have done well to make changes to our lives but we cannot be complacent. Now is the time to redouble our efforts.

“We are seeing a big rise in case numbers and at this rate local lockdown restrictions in Cheshire West are possible as are increased risks to the health of local people. This rise is particularly the case with young people. We need their support to get us back on track but all our residents and businesses have the opportunity to turn this tide. We can make the difference. But we need to act now or our progress will be lost.

“If we all play our part and make sensible changes to our behaviour straight away, maybe we can avoid having to impose further restrictions this autumn and leading up to Christmas.”

The Councils are also putting in place enhanced prevention measures, and will take action through local powers if necessary, to protect the public.

All residents are asked to:

  • Keep to the rule of six;
  • Wash hands regularly;
  • Wear a face covering in places where social distancing may be difficult and;
  • Social distance by two metres in public

If you have COVID-19 symptoms of high fever, continuous cough and loss of taste or

smell, get tested by calling 119 or visit nhs.uk/coronavirus.  If you have a positive test or are alerted by a contact tracer, play your part to protect your community by self-isolating for 10 days or 14 days.

Advice for workplaces:

  • All staff providing table service in hospitality venues are advised to wear face coverings;  
  • All hospitality venues must take customer contact details and refuse to serve customers who fail to give details;
  • All venues must enforce strict social distancing, including of queues outside premises and drinkers/smokers outside premises;
  • All venues must enforce strictly the six person rule;
  • All retail staff should wear a face covering unless they are always behind a screen;
  • Retail outlets are advised to report generally poor customer compliance with face covering to Cheshire Police or the local authority and; 
  • Retail outlets are advised to enforce strict social distancing

Council sets up new payment app to save motorists money


Motorists using a mobile phone to pay for parking at council car parks in Cheshire East will see a reduction in their charges, thanks to a contract negotiated by the council’s parking services team.

From Thursday 1 October, the RingGo app will be replaced by PayByPhone as the new method of payment by phone. Residents and visitors parking in Cheshire East Council’s car parks will benefit from a reduction from 20p to 7p per transaction, while it will also now be free for motorists to request confirmation of their booking and notification of when their parking period is due to expire.

In the last 12 months, half a million transactions have been made using RingGo, so it is anticipated that the new contract with PayByPhone will make huge savings for motorists across the borough.

Councillor Laura Crane, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for highways and waste, said: “I am very happy to see this change go live. We are working hard to ensure that our services provide value for money to our residents and this, whilst not making a saving for the council, is keeping more money in the pockets of local motorists.

“As we all fight hard to beat this virus, many are choosing to use non-contact methods such as this to pay for their car parking needs and I hope that this cost saving will enable more people to make the switch if they are able to, reducing a transmission risk within our community. This also includes our staff and contractors, who maintain and empty the cash from our payment meters, which will continue as normal.”

RingGo will remain in use until midnight on Wednesday 30 September but we would encourage people to download ‘paybyphone’ on their mobile device as this will be the new means of paying for parking by phone from 1 October.

Thursday, 17 September 2020

Local business celebrates 17th birthday






North West based, family owned and run Swansway Motor Group has now reached the ripe old age of 17! That means that if Swansway were to be a human being, they could hop in one of their many cars and start to learn how to drive!

David Smyth, director of Swansway, commented, “It’s strange, just like when you have children and you wonder how they ever got to be the age they are, as time has a habit of sneaking up on you when you’re not looking!”

Swansway, whose head office is based in Crewe, opened 17 years ago with only five car dealerships to its name and has grown to 23 dealerships representing many different car brands including Audi, Volkswagen, Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles, SEAT, Peugeot, Honda, Jaguar and Land Rover as well its own multi-franchise used car division, Motor Match!

David Smyth continued “A huge thank you to everyone who has helped us to reach our 17th year of business. Swansway is a family business with a real family feel and I know this is reflected in the service we give our customers.”

Swansway Group now employs over 1,000 people, operates ten franchises and a non-franchise division, across 23 retailers, from Birmingham in the Midlands to Carlisle in the North  https://www.swanswaygarages.com/

Covid-19: Only get a test if you have symptoms of the virus


Residents and businesses across Cheshire and Merseyside are being urged to only get a Covid-19 test if they have symptoms of the virus.

There has been a huge increase in the number of people seeking a test for coronavirus, partly due to the return of schools and the testing of international travellers. This has put a strain on the laboratories which process the tests.

On top of this, the number of people who do not have symptoms, being tested has also increased; meaning that some people who are symptomatic cannot access a test when they need it.

The delivery of testing sites across Cheshire and Merseyside has been highly successful, however, the sheer number of people now being tested, who often do not have symptoms, has led to laboratories being temporarily overwhelmed across the country.

This situation has seen booking restrictions placed on some of the testing sites in Cheshire East while laboratories cope with such high demand.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is in the process of delivering a huge increase in laboratory capacity. But while this work continues people are asked to only seek a test if they have symptoms and only to attend a testing site if they have an appointment.

Rod Thomson, public health consultant for Cheshire East Council said: “A vast amount of work has gone into delivering the testing infrastructure we need across Cheshire East. There are, regional, local, satellite and mobile testing sites available for our residents and workers across Cheshire and Merseyside.

“The increase in people using those sites in the last few weeks has, however, meant that laboratories need even greater capacity to cope with the demand. Many of the people now seeking tests do not have symptoms of Covid-19 and it is those people we are asking to wait a little longer while the capacity in laboratories is developed nationally.

“It is essential for people who do have symptoms or have been asked by Test and Trace or healthcare professional to get a test, to come forward.

“Testing people with symptoms will help us stop the spread of the virus. As we manage this period of high demand, it is especially important that if individuals don’t have symptoms and have not specifically been advised to take a test, to stay away for now. We are asking people to do this as they could be taking a test away from someone who really needs it at this time.”

Key workers, frontline health and care staff and those in an outbreak area, will continue to be tested whether they have symptoms or not. Areas with outbreaks will also not see booking restrictions placed on mobile testing units to enable local management of the situation.

If you have Covid-19 symptoms; a high temperature, a new, continuous cough and a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste, you can book an appointment at nhs.uk/coronavirus or by calling 119.

Nantwich Museum and Macclesfield Silk Museum set to reopen


After almost six months closure due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Nantwich Museum and Macclesfield’s Silk Museum will reopen to the public this week.

The Macclesfield’s Silk Museum, on Park Lane, will reopen on Thursday 17 September. It will open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10am-4pm (last admission 3pm) for visitors who have pre-booked a free ticket online via https://macclesfield-museums.arttickets.org.uk/ or macclesfieldmuseums.co.uk.

Six visitors will be able to visit at a time, in hourly slots. The Silk Museum asks people to give what they can on admission, with all donations supporting their work with children and families.

Both museums have received generous emergency funding to support the reopening and the development of its work from National Lottery Heritage Fund, Arts Council England and Cheshire East Council.

Nantwich Museum will reopen on Friday 18 September and will also be open on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, from 10am–4.30pm for visitors who have pre-booked tickets. To do this, visit www.nantwichmuseum.org.uk

Throughout the closures, staff worked from home to continue to bring the museums to residents through online means and created home-schooling content, that many parents found useful during the full lockdown situation.

The closures also gave staff the opportunity to undertake housekeeping tasks and develop new displays, ready to inspire visitors.

The planning and preparation of the reopening of both venues has been in accordance with Covid-19 measures to give protection to visitors, staff and volunteers. The changes made will make visits as safe as they can be.

Nantwich Museum visitors will have an opportunity to visit the temporary exhibition in the Millennium Gallery, ‘Personal Voices’ by the Breakaway Textile Group, which will remain in place until the end of the year.

Museum Manager, Kate Dobson said: “I am extremely grateful to all those volunteers, who have been only too keen to enable the museum to reopen as soon as possible despite what will inevitably be challenging conditions.”

Visitors must book their visit by telephoning the museum on 01270 627104, when they will also be advised of any specific requirements.

Macclesfield Silk Museum visitors will find that the famous Ancient Egyptian collection will be on display once again. Find out about the lives of these fascinating people through the artefacts and inscriptions they left behind as you explore the oldest objects in the museum.

Learn about the connection between silk and Egypt through the lives of Marianne Brocklehurst and Mary Booth, the two Victorian explorers who gave their collection of Ancient Egyptian artefacts to Macclesfield.

John Varney, Chair of the Silk Heritage Trust, said: “We’re very much looking forward to welcoming back visitors to the Silk Museum and sharing our new stories and displays in the Red Room – as well as our incredibly popular Ancient Egyptian artefacts.

“The safety of our visitors and staff is our top priority, which is why we’ve decided to only allow small numbers in the museum every hour. However, we believe that this will give visitors a fantastic chance to really immerse themselves in our wonderful collection.”

To book a ticket and for more information, go to www.macclesfieldmuseums.co.uk  or if you aren’t able to book online, call 01625 612045.

Information and reminders about events at both museums will feature on Cheshire East Council’s social media pages. Please follow @CheshireEastCouncil on Facebook and @CheshireEast on Twitter to keep up-to-date.

Carbon neutral action plan shortlisted for national award


Cheshire East Council’s action plan to be carbon neutral by 2025 has been shortlisted for a national environment and sustainability award.

In May last year, elected members committed to Cheshire East becoming carbon neutral by 2025 and to influencing carbon emission reduction across the borough.

The action plan focusses not only on how the 2025 target will be achieved, but also on how the council will encourage all businesses, residents and organisations to reduce emissions.

The Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA) sustainability impact awards ceremony will take place virtually this Friday (18 September). It showcases individuals and organisations making the transformational changes needed to tackle the climate and environmental emergency.

Councillor Nick Mannion, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for environment and regeneration, said: “Being shortlisted for this award is a huge credit to the team that has developed our carbon neutral action plan, which was approved by our cabinet earlier this year. 

“I’m proud of the work that has gone into the plan, which clearly sets out how we will build on our carbon reduction work to date, in order to reach our ambitious carbon neutral target by 2025. The plan will help to ensure that we all continue to work together to make a real impact on the future sustainability of the borough.

“Being shortlisted for this national award is a real testament to the amount of work that the team has put into developing a campaign that delivers exceptional environmental and sustainability outcomes.”

IEMA is the professional body for everyone working in environment sustainability and the sustainability impact awards recognise best practice and success in the industry.

To view Cheshire East’s carbon neutral action plan, visit the website.

Wednesday, 9 September 2020

Cheshire East Council thanks pupils, parents and staff for school attendance


Schools in Cheshire East have seen levels of attendance significantly higher than the England average, following the long Covid lockdown.

Early figures from the Department for Education show that, of the 113 Cheshire East schools that submitted a data return on Thursday 3 September, 100 were fully open – an open rate of 88.5 per cent - the national average being 71.5 per cent for that day. 

Attendance at these schools was 79.5 per cent, with the national average being 62.5 per cent. Where schools were fully open, the attendance rate was more than 92.9 per cent.

Councillor Kathryn Flavell, cabinet member for children and families, said: “I would like to thank Cheshire East’s pupils, parents, teachers and the many other staff who have made such a positive start ‘Back to School’. 

“It is early days yet, but initial indications are that the preparations that our schools have made, supported by the council, have put us in the best possible position to welcome children back, to continue their essential classroom-based education. 

“I firmly believe that for most children, school is the best place for them to learn. While tremendous efforts were made during lockdown to provide remote learning opportunities, for many this was no replacement for classroom working.

“We know that the lockdown and return to school has been a difficult and anxious time for some and we are offering a range of support to those who need help.

“We continue to work hard with our schools, colleges, early years and transport providers to make these first few days back into school as easy, safe and happy as possible for all Cheshire East pupils.”

Information and guidance for the wider opening of schools is available at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk.schools

Information about school transport can be found at: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/schooltransport

Bike Theft Alert - Here Are Some Useful Tips To Keep Your Bike Safe - Crewe Police

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Cheshire Constabulary

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Bike Theft Alert - Here Are Some Useful Tips To Keep Your Bike Safe - Crewe Police


Good morning,
We have unfortunately been made aware of several bike thefts in Crewe and surrounding areas.
We'd like to offer some useful tips for you to keep your bike safe and secure.
1. Invest in a couple of good quality bike locks, 1 being a D-lock.
2. Cable locks for extra security.
3. Lock frame and both wheels to cycle parking stand.
4. A well lit area with CCTV.
5. Remove saddle.
6. Take the same care at home, bikes get taken from communal hallways, gardens & sheds.
7. Make your bike unique to you.
8. Remove valuable accessories.
9. Don’t leave your bike for a few minutes whilst you nip in the shop.
10. Don’t park in the same place every day.
Thank you for your time! We will be running some bike marking sessions in an area near you in the near future and will you keep you updated with the times and dates of these sessions on here and on our Facebook pages!
Your local Facebook and Twitter pages details can be found using the link below:-
https://www.cheshire.police.uk/
Once you have gone onto the link, scroll down and type in your area. There will then be an option to select 'local activity' , this will link you to the Twitter and Facebook posts! (You do not have to be signed up to see these.)
An example of these is - https://www.cheshire.police.uk/a/your-area/cheshire/cheshire-east/haslington/?tab=LocalActivity
For any further assistance, don't hesitate to drop us a reply and I will happily help!
Thank you for your time and we hope that you found this message useful.
Kind regards,
PCSO Lizzie Jolley 22582
Haslington Police
Cheshire Police

School Parking and Road Safety Haslington and Weston

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Cheshire Constabulary

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School Parking and Road Safety Haslington and Weston


Good morning,
I hope that you are well.
This message is for those who care for children in the Haslington and Weston area.
Back to school after what has been an usual past few months may be a relief for many of you, but for some the worry continues because of the road safety for their child.
This is where we can work together. We want everybody to feel safe and reassured that their child will be safe coming to and from school. Every parent and guardian has a responsibility to make this happen.
We apologise if this message seems like lots of 'do not's', however these are vital to keep our children and residents safe.
The Dingle Primary School -
- Clay Lane/The Dingle Road Junction - NOBODY must park where the grassed area is. This will put others at risk as it blocks the view of the junction. You WILL receive a ticket if you seen parking at this location.
- Cricket Club Parking - The Cricket Club kindly allows parents/guardians to park at this location, follow their guidance as to where to park based on information on school letters and signage.
- The ZIGZAG yellow lines must be obeyed. They are there for your child's safety and anyone seen parked on them will receive a ticket.
- Primrose Avenue Junction. Do NOT park within 10M of the junction and please show respect for local residents. Anyone obstructing a driveway has the risk of getting towed away.
Haslington Primary School -
- Do NOT park on the double yellow lines outside the school. They are there for your child's safety and Cheshire East Parking Enforcement will be working with us to monitor this area. Tickets will be given out if anyone is seen parked on these.
-Do NOT park on the corner of the One Stop/Fields Road as this makes it very dangerous for both residents, drivers and local school children.
- A red light means STOP. There were several reports of drivers going through red lights when children were crossing. Anyone seen driving in this dangerous way will be dealt with accordingly.
- Please park respectfully around the Pub and do not park in front of residents properties.
Weston Village Primary School -
- Do NOT park on the corner of East Avenue/Cemetery Road, Weston. Tickets will be issued to anyone causing obstruction of the junction.
-Do NOT park on the junction of Poppy Close/East Avenue.
- Do NOT park on Poppy Close and block local residents in their driveways.
We look forward to seeing safer roads for our children to come to and from school.
Thank you for your time.
Kind regards,
PCSO Lizzie Jolley 22582
Haslington Police

Scam Alert - Tv Licensing

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Cheshire Constabulary

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Scam Alert - Tv Licensing


Good Morning,
We have received several reports of a Scam Email which is currently being circulated in the local area.
The email appears to be from TV Licensing and tries to convince you that your TV License has been suspended due to non payment.
This is a reminder that you should never put your payment details on an email no matter the payment amount. If there is ever any doubt that an email or phone call may be a scam, then do not reply or make sure you hang up immediately and contact the company via their official methods.
I hope you find this Alert useful.
Kind Regards
PCSO Tim Davey

Become a 12th man in your community


In England 13 people kill themselves every day, that’s one person every 90 minutes – the length of a football match.

World Suicide Prevention Day takes place on Thursday 10 September, and to promote this, Cheshire East Council is launching a new suicide prevention programme. 

A community interest company called The Outsiders are delivering the 12th Man campaign. The idea behind the 12th Man is taken from a football team using its crowd of supporters as its 12th person to their 11-player team. Supporters encourage and motivate their team to perform better and support them whether they’re moving up the league or risking relegation. The 12th man supports their team through the best of times and the worst of times.

The campaign is about calling on individuals in the community to recognise when a friend, colleague or relative is struggling and to act as their 12th man by offering support and solidarity when they need it the most, just like football supporters do with their team. This will encourage men to share their emotions and not hide them, empowering them to talk about mental health more openly, more often, and without stigma or prejudice.

The campaign which will be implemented across Cheshire East, will help men develop the skills and tactics needed to support each other when they are struggling to cope and finding life difficult. Talking openly with each other will help to end the stigma that can currently be a barrier for men seeking help.

Suicide is the single biggest killer of men under the age of 50 and a leading cause of death in young men. In England, three out of every four suicides are men. Male suicide rates are significantly higher than female rates in almost every country across the globe.

Councillor Jill Rhodes, Cabinet member for public health and corporates services at Cheshire East Council, said: “Talking about our mental health and wellbeing is more important than ever.

“Programmes like the 12th Man campaign can have a big impact in reducing the numbers of men who feel lonely or isolated and can also help to reduce the number who may think about or attempt to take their own life.”

Nick Little, founder of The Outsiders, said: “The 12th Man campaign aims to get men talking about mental health. We are excited to run the campaign in East Cheshire and we hope this will be the next step in our aim to establish the campaign in communities across the country.

“The key to our campaign is collaboration between local businesses and interest groups and we look forward to helping facilitate this in Crewe and Macclesfield.”

Free Bike Marking and Registration - Haslington - 12th of September 2020

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Cheshire Constabulary

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Free Bike Marking and Registration - Haslington - 12th of September 2020


Good afternoon,
I hope that you are well.
This Saturday the 12th of September 2020 at 17:30pm-19:30pm, there is a free bike marking event at The Village Green in Haslington.
We expect social distancing at the event.
Any children must know their address, phone number & email address. This event is for anyone who wishes to attend.
We will expect a line to be formed and it will be first come, first served. Anyone who is not fitted in on the day will be offered an alternative date.
Thank you for your time and we look forward to seeing you there!
Kind regards,
PCSO Lizzie Jolley 22582
Haslington Police

Wednesday, 2 September 2020

Shed and Garage Breaks

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Cheshire Constabulary

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Shed and Garage Breaks


During the last couple of months we have had an increase in shed and garage breaks, the incidents are occurring throughout the night. A number of bikes have been stolen and vehicles broken into, if you see something suspicious please report it on 101.
We know that these offenders are currently operating in this area, and are working hard to catch them. But we do not want local residents to fall prey to them, and so offer the advice within this email to offer some Crime prevention advice.
Outside Your Home
· Make thieves feel exposed when they approach the front of your property using low hedges or low fencing.
· Use garden lighting to deter trespassers.  Choose lights which come on automatically at dusk and stay on all night until dawn.  Low wattage bulbs can cost less than 1p per night in electricity.
· Growing a hedge made from a prickly bush or planting prickly bushes next to fences can deter trespassers from climbing over.
· Don’t leave tools and ladders lying around for burglars to use.
Your Neighbours
· Join a local Home Watch scheme (your local police officers will be able to tell you if there is a scheme nearby)
· When you are away let your neighbour have contact details for you (or someone who can act on your behalf) in case of emergencies
· And consider asking them to collect post or open & close curtains
Thank you
PCSO 20324 MEGGS

Warning Following Resurgence of Scam Phone Calls Purporting To Be from Microsoft

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Cheshire Constabulary

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Warning Following Resurgence of Scam Phone Calls Purporting To Be from Microsoft


Detectives are urging people to stay vigilant following several reports of scam phone calls purporting to be from Microsoft.
In Cheshire there have been several reports of residents receiving phone calls from fraudsters posing as workers from Microsoft.
The scammers claim to be computer security engineers and tell victims that their computers are at a security risk.
They then say that a security check needs to be performed and if the victim agrees, the scammers can then gain remote access to the computer.
This access allows fraudsters to obtain personal details about the victims including their bank account.
Detective Sergeant Chris Jacques, of the Economic Crime Unit, said: “This is a particularly heinous crime whereby scammers target the most vulnerable in society.
“This scam has seen a resurgence over the years but as time goes on, fraudsters can use more sophisticated techniques in order to persuade victims to hand over money or gain access to their computers.
“These fraudsters are often extremely convincing and pose as working for a reputable company as it gives them more credibility.
“We are doing all we can to tackle all types of fraud and I would urge anyone who believes that they have been a victim of this scam to please report it to Cheshire Constabulary and Action Fraud.”
Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire, David Keane said: “Fraud not only leaves victims without their hard earned money, it also has a significant emotional impact.
“As Police and Crime Commissioner, I will continue to ensure that action is taken against scammers who are so heartlessly targeting the vulnerable in Cheshire.
“I would urge residents to follow the key advice and please continue to educate and inform elderly family members about these scams.”
Key advice:

  • Computer firms such as Microsoft do not make unsolicited phone calls to help fix your computer or fix a security risk.
  • Treat all unsolicited phone calls with scepticism and never give out any personal information.
  • Computer companies will not ask for credit card information to validate copies of software or ask for ID such as a driving licence or passport.
Anyone who believes they have been contacted fraudulently or have been a victim of fraud should call Cheshire Police on 101 and Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040.
Information can also be reported online to https://www.cheshire.police.uk/ro/report/

Council celebrates opening of new special schools in Covid-19 crisis


Cheshire East Council has praised the teams behind the opening of two new special schools in Crewe as the autumn term starts after months of Covid restrictions.

The two schools, Axis Academy and Lavender Field School offer places for children and young people, aged four to 18 with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), in particular those with social, emotional and mental health needs.

The need for more special schools was established as part of a structured programme to increase places for children and young people with SEND. The detailed plan, agreed in 2017, recognised that many pupils with SEND had very long journeys to and from school, with one in five travelling more than 45 minutes each way and many educated outside of the borough.

The last three years has seen considerable capital investment in Cheshire East schools to increase both the number of places for children and young people with SEND, but also to improve support and resources in mainstream schools.

The Axis Academy, run by the Youth Engagement Schools Trust, will open on Tuesday 1 September, initially to 32 students, increasing to 48 by 2022. The academy will focus on providing education to young people with mental health needs supporting all areas from personal wellbeing to academic success. Initially the school will be run from The Stables on Warmingham Road, Crewe before moving to its permanent location at Lodgefields Drive, Crewe in January.

Lavender Field School will accommodate up to 50 pupils from September 2020, with a potential expansion to 75, from September 2021. The school offers a personalised education, rooted in social, emotional and physical development.

Councillor Kathryn Flavell, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for children and families said: “Like most councils, we have a growing need for school places for children and young people with special educational needs.

“I’d like to thank and praise all the teams working on the construction of both schools including our school projects team, the Youth Engagement Youth Trust and Lavender Fields. I know they have worked tirelessly to keep the projects on schedule, so they can open their doors and welcome students to the new term during these difficult times.

“I would also like to thank the Cheshire East Parent Carer Forum for their help and support in understanding the views of parents and carers, and enabling us to provide children and young people with the excellent education and support they deserve in a school close to family, friends and their communities.

Nic Brindle, chief executive officer of the Youth Engagement Schools Trust, said: “We are thrilled to open the Axis Academy to help support vulnerable children in the area and we are delighted to be able to start helping change children’s futures for the better.

“The Axis Academy offers a full broad academic curriculum taught by subject specialists allowing all students to find their passions and develop these leading to apprenticeships, college placements and A-levels.

“This is reinforced by a rounded and complete support network including mental health counselling, wellbeing support, and activities focussed on ensuring we have resilient lifelong learners.

“We are proud to be able to start helping change children’s futures for the better and we can’t wait to get started and share the successes of our first ever students as they successfully master their own education.”

Co-executive headteacher of Lavender Fields, Lucy Gibbs said:We are extremely excited to be opening our doors to pupils in September and are honoured to have the opportunity to offer a life-changing experience to children and their families. Pupils will have a range of additional needs and enjoy an innovative, personalised and therapeutic education.”

More information on both schools can be found at www.theaxisacademy.org and www.lavenderfieldschool.co.uk

August 2020 Enewsletter - Firelink

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Cheshire Fire & Rescue Service

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August 2020 Enewsletter - Firelink



Welcome to the August edition of the Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service e-Newsletter.


Cheshire Fire Cadets determined to help Nepalese school children

A determined group of Cheshire Fire Cadets who raised over £50,000 before lockdown have vowed to continue their quest to secure enough money to finish building classrooms for village children in Nepal.
The team of 13 fire cadets and six leaders had spent nearly two years fundraising and were on track to make a trip out to Nepal this year to meet the schoolchildren using the classrooms, before it was unfortunately postponed due to coronavirus restrictions.
Firstly lockdown halted their fundraising activities and caused the price of the building to go up and then monsoons in the area hampered the construction progress.
Find out more - Cheshire Fire Cadets determined to help Nepalese school children

Mum and dad-of-four end up in hospital following fire caused by charging e-cigarette

A couple from Crewe ended up in hospital as a result of a fire in their home which was started by a charging e-cigarette.
Jennifer Brown, 35, and Scot Washington, 34, suffered from the effects of smoke inhalation after managing to extinguish the fire in an upstairs bedrooms.
They are fully aware that the consequences of the fire on Friday 31 July could have been far worse and are urging others to never take any chances when it comes to charging e-cigs.
Find out more - Mum and dad-of-four end up in hospital following fire caused by charging e-cigarette

Thursday, 27 August 2020

‘Gorgeous’ Tatton Park Garden named best in the UK


26/08/2020

‘Gorgeous’ Tatton Park Garden named best in the UK

New online research has rated every National Trust garden in the UK, and Tatton Park is number one. “It’s wonderful that the photos and reviews shared by our visitors have secured this top spot for us. We’ve always known how beloved our Garden is but for it to be rated in this way is great”, says Simon Tetlow, Head Gardener at Tatton Park.

Visitors find take-home inspiration at Tatton Park Gardens

The report, carried out by Rated People after rating all UK National Trust gardens against an index of visitor reviews on Google and photos on Instagram, also highlights Brits spending more time in their own gardens due to lockdown and staycations. Not only is Tatton Park Garden a welcome change of scenery post lockdown, it provides acres of inspiration for budding gardeners looking for achievable, take-home ideas. People find the Japanese Garden especially inspiring and the Walled Kitchen Garden evokes lots of interest for visitors keen on growing their own fruit and veg.

“Gardening for the public is what motivates us”

Simon and his team of Gardeners and Volunteers dedicate their horticultural skills and passion to looking after 50 acres of some of the most varied garden in the country. Specialised areas at Tatton Park range from Orchard, Arboretum, Italian and Rose, to Japanese, Fernery and Pinery, to name but a few. “It does feel extra special in the Gardens this summer” says Simon. “I don’t know if it’s a new appreciation of open spaces since lockdown, or people getting their social life back after self-isolating. Whatever the reason, it’s been a joy to welcome our staff, volunteers and visitors back to the Gardens, and to meet and work with people from all walks of life.”

“I never lose sight of the fact that hundreds of years ago, this magnificent garden was created for the pleasure of just one family” reflects Simon. “My team’s job is to maintain its beauty make it accessible for everyone to enjoy. It’s wonderful that today the Garden is shared by thousands of visitors, and they’re inspired to share photos and reviews online.”

How the online review placed Tatton Park at the top

Rated People researched all National Trust gardens in the UK and ranked them against an index of online reviews on Google and picturesque images on Instagram. Tatton Park came out on top, with Corfe Castle, Dorset in second place and Stourhead Landscape Garden, Wiltshire at number three. Locally, Lyme Park in Cheshire was rated sixth.

‘Spectacular Views’ photography competition

Tatton Park is hosting a photography contest on their Instagram channel, with a chance to win a Head Gardener's Cottage Picnic for 2 which can be enjoyed at one of the picnic spots in the Park. View details of how to enter plus terms and conditions at tattonpark.org.uk. Experience their ‘Gorgeous’ Gardens for yourself, and post on Instagram your ‘spectacular view’ with the tags #tattonpark and #yourhappyplacetp

Council welcomes Local Authority Emergency Assistance Fund for food and essential supplies


The government has recently announced emergency assistance of £63 million to be distributed to local authorities in England.

Cheshire East Council has been allocated with £326,292.53 to use to support groups who are helping people who are struggling to afford food and other essentials due to Covid-19.

This additional funding will be used to build on the success of our community response and recovery fund. It is primarily aimed at supporting organisations to assist residents who are struggling to afford food and other essentials due to the economic impact caused by Covid-19 and is now open to those groups and organisations that want to help communities through the crisis.

Local charities and community organisations already can apply for grants towards the cost of getting food and other essentials to those who need it the most and by delivering essential Covid-19 related services.

Councillor Mick Warren, Cheshire East Council’s cabinet member for communities, said: “Our share of this government funding will help to ensure our most vulnerable residents continue to get access to food and other essentials at this challenging time.

“Our priority will be allocating grants where the need is greatest and other eligible projects that fall into categories such as food banks, soup kitchens, meal and shopping delivery, food distribution and lunch/breakfast clubs”.

Local charities and voluntary groups, including faith-based organisations taking an active role in responding to urgent needs of Cheshire East residents who have suffered from the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, can apply for these new funds.

For more details about this latest fund visit our community funds and grants website page   https://www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/communitygrant

Commissioner Seeks Victim Feedback

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Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire

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Commissioner Seeks Victim Feedback


Have you been a victim of crime in Cheshire in the last three years?
If so, Cheshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner wants your views on the support you received from Cheshire police and other support services.
It is part of a full victim needs assessment PCC David Keane is carrying out in order to improve victim support services across Cheshire.
The Commissioner is responsible for commissioning local support services for victims of crime and funds a range of services which support victims, including Cheshire CARES.
He wants to know which services helped you to recover from the crime and whether you feel adequate support was provided. He also wants to learn what services you think should be available in the future.
If you’ve been a victim of crime in Cheshire between now and 2017, you can have your say by visiting: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/cheshirevictimsvoicesurvey

Council asks parents to keep school gates clear


Cheshire East Council is asking parents and carers to help keep school gates clear of traffic when pupils return to class in September.

Around 56,000 children and young people attend more than 170 schools and colleges across the borough. Of these, around 3,500 students are eligible to receive free dedicated home-to-school transport, funded by the council, leaving around 52,500 making their own arrangements for the journeys to and from school every day.

The council recognises that some parents and carers will choose to take their children to school by car and is asking them to help by planning their journeys in advance. Several active travel initiatives are being promoted to help with this, with information and support provided to schools to help them encourage walking, cycling or scooting. Schemes such as ‘park and stride’ can also help relieve congestion where parents park or drop off in a safe, considerate place away from school gates and walk the remainder of the journey.

To safely manage transport for the return to school – especially after such a long period away for many pupils – the council has also put in place additional buses that will be restricted to picking up pupils only. Information on transport arrangements in place from 1 September can be found online at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/schooltransport

For those travelling on school buses, the council is implementing a number of measures, in line with government guidance, to minimise the risk of coronavirus, including:

● Promoting the use of hand sanitiser upon boarding and/or disembarking;

● Additional cleaning of vehicles;

● Organised queuing and boarding, where possible;

● Distancing within vehicles, wherever possible; and

● The use of face coverings for children (except those who are exempt), where appropriate, for example, if they are likely to come into very close contact with people outside of their group or who they do not normally meet.

Parents are also advised that there is a delay in issuing school bus passes, and the council has arranged a two-week grace period where young people can travel without showing their pass until it arrives.

Any young people using trains to get to school or college need to be aware that it is essential to wear a face covering (unless exempt), maintain social distancing and be mindful of people around them.

Councillor Kathryn Flavell, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for children and families, said: “After most of us entered lockdown back in March, with many children continuing their education at home, I understand that the return to school may feel daunting for some parents. 

“I’d like to reassure them that teams across the council are working tirelessly with schools and transport providers to implement safety measures in readiness for the new term.

“We’d like to ask parents and carers who have to drive, to help us to ensure children and young people get to and from school safely and relieve congestion by planning their journeys and parking in a safe and considerate location.”

Councillor Laura Crane, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for highways and waste, said: “Walking, cycling or scooting to school are some of the simplest ways to reduce congestion and pollution around school gates. As we emerge from the Covid-19 restrictions, the benefits of active travel on improved mental and physical wellbeing are more important than ever.

“We recognise that for some people, walking to school isn’t possible, and I urge everyone who does the school run by car to keep the routes around the school gates clear by parking a safe distance away and walking the last 10 minutes where possible.”

Parents are also advised to check their school's website and social media channels regularly for the latest information from their school and details about drop off and pick up arrangements.

Council celebrates opening of new special schools in Covid-19 crisis


Cheshire East Council has recognised and praised the teams behind the opening of two new special schools in Crewe for children aged between four and 18, as the autumn term commences following months of Covid restrictions.

The two schools, Axis Academy and Lavender Field School offer places for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), in particular those with social, emotional and mental health needs.

The need for more special schools was established as part of a structured programme to increase places for children and young people with SEND. The detailed plan, agreed in 2017, recognised that many pupils with SEND had very long journeys to and from school, with one in five travelling more than 45 minutes each way and many educated outside of the borough.

The last three years has seen considerable capital investment in Cheshire East schools to increase both the number of places for children and young people with SEND, but also to improve support and resources in mainstream schools. 

The Axis Academy, run by the Youth Engagement Schools Trust, will open on Tuesday 1 September, initially to 32 students, increasing to 48 by 2022.  The academy will focus on providing education to young people with mental health needs supporting all areas from personal wellbeing to academic success. 

Lavender Field School will accommodate up to 50 pupils from September 2020, with a potential expansion to 75, from September 2021. The school offers a personalised education, rooted in social, emotional and physical development.

Councillor Kathryn Flavell, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for children and families said: “Like most councils, we have a growing need for school places for children and young people with special educational needs. 

“I’d like to thank and praise all the teams working on the construction of both schools including our school projects team, the Youth Engagement Youth Trust and Lavender Fields. I know they have worked tirelessly to keep the projects on schedule, so they can open their doors and welcome students to the new term during these difficult times.

“I would also like to thank the Cheshire East Parent Carer Forum for their help and support in understanding the views of parents and carers, and enabling us to provide children and young people with the excellent education and support they deserve in a school close to family, friends and their communities.

Nic Brindle, chief executive officer of the Youth Engagement Schools Trust, said: “We are thrilled to open the Axis Academy to help support vulnerable children in the area and we are delighted to be able to start helping change children’s futures for the better.

“The Axis Academy offers a full broad academic curriculum taught by subject specialists allowing all students to find their passions and develop these leading to apprenticeships, college placements and A-levels.

“This is reinforced by a rounded and complete support network including mental health counselling, wellbeing support, and activities focussed on ensuring we have resilient lifelong learners.

“We are proud to be able to start helping change children’s futures for the better and we can’t wait to get started and share the successes of our first ever students as they successfully master their own education.”

Co-executive headteacher of Lavender Fields, Lucy Gibbs said:We are extremely excited to be opening our doors to pupils in September and are honoured to have the opportunity to offer a life-changing experience to children and their families. Pupils will have a range of additional needs and enjoy an innovative, personalised and therapeutic education.”

More information on both schools can be found at www.theaxisacademy.org and www.lavenderfieldschool.co.uk

Friday, 21 August 2020

Cheshire Officers Using New Tool To Combat Caravan and Motorhome Thefts

Cheshire Constabulary

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Cheshire Constabulary is using a new tool to aid the force’s fight against caravan and motorhome thieves.
The VIN CHIP anti-theft identification system enables officers to scan a touring caravan or motorhome from up to 15 metres away to see if it has been reported as stolen and find out who the registered owner is.
They can be scanned at speeds of up to 60mph.
Cheshire’s Roads and Crime Unit officers are now using the system, and owners of touring caravans and motorhomes across the county are being advised to ensure that they have a VIN CHIP fitted and are registered with the Caravan Registration and Identification Scheme (CRiS).
Inspector Anton Sullivan, of the Roads and Crime Unit, said: “Due to supply and demand, the number of caravan and motorhome theft incidents tend to rise in the summer months.
“This year the demand for them is even greater than normal, with travel restrictions imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic making staycations, mobile homes and caravan holidays more popular than ever.
“So we could not have asked for a better time to add the VIN CHIP scanning system to our armoury for when we are out on patrol and monitoring our roads.
“Used by many other police forces in the UK, ports officers and also in mainland Europe and Scandinavia, it has substantially increased the number of stolen caravans and motorhomes that have been recovered and returned to their rightful owner.”
Since 2008 a radio frequency chip containing a unique vehicle identification number (VIN) number has been embedded into all UK-approved touring caravans when they have been made.
Owners of older caravans can have one fitted at a relatively small cost, and owners of caravans made between 2008 and 2016 can pay to have their chip upgraded so that it works as well as the newer ones. This may have an insurance benefit with some companies.
Motorhome owners can also pay to have a VIN CHIP fitted, and some manufacturers are now embedding them into all their new motorhomes.
Insp Sullivan added: “Working like a speed gun, a VIN CHIP scanner enables an officer to quickly see if a caravan or motorhome on the move has been reported as stolen, and who the registered owner is.
“Once a caravan or motorhome has been identified as stolen we will endeavour to bring the thief, or thieves, to justice, and have it returned to its owner.
“Our officers are now using the system to this end across Cheshire.
“However, the system will not work for touring caravan or motorhome theft victims unless they have a VIN CHIP fitted.
“Touring caravan and motorhome owners are advised to have a VIN Chip fitted and to have the vehicle registered with CRiS to help their mobile home be located in the event of it being stolen.
David Keane, Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire, said: “I am delighted to hear that Cheshire Constabulary has a new tool to help officers catch caravan and motorhome thieves and recover stolen vehicles.
“Opportunist thieves could not only potentially ruin someone’s staycation but could also put touring caravan and motorhome owners at risk of losing thousands of pounds if their vehicle is stolen.
“I urge all caravan and motorhome owners across the county to follow the advice from Cheshire Constabulary and check the security of their vehicles.”
Anyone with any information or footage regarding the theft of caravans or motorhomes is asked to call Constabulary on 101, give the details via https://www.cheshire.police.uk/ro/report or contact Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.
Further security advice for caravan and motorhome owners is available on our website https://www.cheshire.police.uk/news/cheshire/news/articles/2020/8/cheshire-officers-using-new-tool-to-combat-caravan-and-motorhome-thefts/

We Are Turning A Negative Into A Positive - Haslington Residents

Cheshire Constabulary

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We Are Turning A Negative Into A Positive - Haslington Residents


Good afternoon,
We've unfortunately had several reports of anti-social behaviour at the village green in Haslington. In response to this, we've worked with the Cheshire East Anti-social Behaviour Team.
Anti-social behaviour reports have been completed and letters will be received by those who have been involved.
We are however are aware that we've all been experiencing a different way of life recently due to COVID-19, and in the near future will be providing more free Youth Skills sessions to encourage positive behaviour in our community and offer young people new and healthy hobbies.
For more details about these see our Facebook and Twitter pages :-
https://www.facebook.com/pg/HaslingtonPol/photos/?ref=page_internal
Discussions including health and safety meetings around risk assessments have taken place with the Oakhanger Team to offer Kayaking in the near future.

Celebrate Love Culture Week with Cheshire East’s outdoor and online visitor attractions


Cheshire East families are being invited to take part in an array of summer activities to mark Love Culture Week.

A host of events and visitor attractions are on offer this week (17-22 August) which can be enjoyed safely across the borough.

Tatton Park’s parkland, gardens, farm and mansion are now all open for the public to enjoy as well as many National Trust properties and gardens, such as Arley Hall. Jodrell Bank, now given ‘world heritage’ status, is also set to welcome visitors back from Saturday 22 August.

Crewe Cultural Forum is hosting a series of free or low-cost events this week in the Lyceum Square. The #CreWECREATE programme includes children’s crafts with Creative Crewe, Creative Minds Cheshire and David Jewkes Art.
Theatre workshops are being held in partnership with the Platform Theatre, as well as introduction to photography classes with Crewe Photographic Society. Arts and crafts activities are drop-in sessions, however, workshops need to be booked online for social distancing preparations via: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/organizations/events.

Many places have now opened safely with the We’re Good to Go kitemark for attractions. And while some places remain closed for the time being, there are also a range of online programmes taking place this week. Cinemac in Macclesfield, Wild Rumpus’ summer programme and Electric Picture House exhibitions can be accessed via their websites and the council’s Live Well service.

Councillor Nick Mannion, Cheshire East Council’s cabinet member for environment and regeneration, said: “Our visitor economy is normally worth nearly £1billion a year and supports approximately 12,000 jobs. Love Culture Week is a great government initiative, giving an opportunity to profile cultural activities, events and attractions available to us here in Cheshire East – digitally and outdoors. 

“The council’s culture team is working hard to support our local economy and community organisations to generate new activity, to bring confidence back during the pandemic. However, with so much restarting and such a range of cultural activities on the doorstep, we hope families will use the rest of the school holidays to explore Cheshire East.”

Many online activities being provided by arts and cultural organisations can be accessed across the UK. Search visitcheshire.com for ideas and inspiration on what to do for the remainder of the summer.

Sunday, 16 August 2020

Cheshire and Merseyside receive Suicide-Safer Community accolade


Cheshire and Merseyside has been awarded Suicide-Safer Community status by Living Works, the world’s leading suicide prevention training company.

This award is symbolic of the hard work of colleagues and partners from across Cheshire and Merseyside over the last five years, implementing the NO MORE Suicide Strategy together.

The sub-region fulfils all the high standards required for the accreditation through an improvement approach to working. This is difficult to achieve for one locally, so to have been successful as a sub-region is a tremendous accomplishment.

It is testament to the excellent integrated working, innovation and cross-cutting programmes that Cheshire and Merseyside partners deliver as system leaders.

In order to be recognised as a Suicide-Safer Community, there are ten areas of community action that must be addressed. These include training, suicide bereavement, leadership and mental health promotion.

There is still much more to be done in order to achieve zero suicides in the regions but this award signals great progress.

Sue Forster, Chair of the Cheshire & Merseyside NO MORE Suicide Partnership Board and Director of Public Health for St Helens said “So many people have contributed towards this prestigious accolade. I am grateful for their dedication and support. We truly have a fantastic partnership approach to suicide prevention and have achieved many things from training to awareness raising campaigns and supporting those bereaved by suicide.

“On behalf of the NO MORE Suicide Partnership Board I would like to thank all colleagues and partners who have helped us achieve this award. As we refresh the NO MORE Suicide strategy and action plan, we will continue to work together in our aim to reach zero suicide in Cheshire & Merseyside.”

Louise Gittins, lead elected member for Suicide Prevention in Cheshire & Merseyside and Leader of Cheshire West & Chester Council added: “I am delighted to hear that Cheshire & Merseyside have received this award.

“I have been so impressed with the work that has been carried out to prevent suicide in our area and have seen the dedication and commitment of the Board, operational groups and partners throughout Cheshire & Merseyside. I look forward to working with colleagues in the future on this important public health issue.”

Dr Matt Tyrer, acting director of public health at Cheshire East Council, said: “Suicide and mental health are topics that many people feel unable to talk about for fear of being misunderstood or others being judgemental.

“This award and the training behind it will allow the public health team at Cheshire East Council, and teams across the sub region, to be well equipped with the necessary skills to work with partners and residents to spread awareness, offer support and to reduce stigma.

“Ultimately improving our mental health and wellbeing and feeling empowered to talk about how we are feeling will help us to reach zero suicides in Cheshire East.”

The award will be celebrated and acknowledged at the World Suicide Prevention Day webinar led by Champs Collaborative on the 10th September 'Hope and Recovery in the time of COVID-19'. Registration for this webinar will open shortly.

Business Champion appointed to aid Cheshire East economic recovery


Councillor Sam Corcoran, leader of Cheshire East Council has announced that Councillor Sarah Pochin, Bunbury ward, has been appointed as the council’s business champion, to support economic recovery in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The newly created role is set to support businesses on our high streets, engaging with SMEs, larger organisations and those facing unemployment across the borough. Councillor Pochin will support and advise cabinet members on the following;

  • Regulatory and government policy to aid high street and town centre recovery across Cheshire East
  • The promotion of the borough and appropriate support mechanisms to attract inward investment
  • Development of the council’s commercial strategy and the commercial ventures
  • Delivery of the rural action plan in relation to support to the rural economy in Cheshire East
  • Delivering a sustainable and green economy in Cheshire East including the development of low carbon industry.

Together with the relevant cabinet members and officers, Councillor Pochin will engage with businesses and corporate representatives across Cheshire East, to successfully deliver agreed targets within approved timescales.

On her appointment, Councillor Sam Corcoran, leader of Cheshire East Council, said: “Covid-19 has had a profound impact on businesses in Cheshire East, as it has across the UK and internationally. However, I am proud of the borough’s economy, its businesses and workers and I am confident that we can overcome the obstacles that Covid-19 has created. I look forward to the benefit of Councillor Pochin’s advice and experience in supporting the council’s economic recovery across the borough.”

Councillor Sarah Pochin, said: “I am delighted to be given the opportunity to take on a vital role, as part of the council’s support for economic recovery. Our borough continues to face many challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic. As business champion, I am looking forward to supporting the cabinet in taking this important agenda forward. 

“Aiding economic recovery is a necessity, to attract new investment and develop our rural and green economies. I will work hard, alongside cabinet, to ensure all businesses and their employees across Cheshire East are supported.”

Council launches third and final phase of discretionary grants for priority businesses


Cheshire East Council has launched the third phase of the local discretionary grant scheme, this final phase will close at 8am on Monday 17 August 2020. 

The council has already implemented a second phase of this grant scheme which closed on Friday 26 June. This third phase seeks to support the remainder of businesses across the borough who failed to qualify for the first and second phase. This phase will be open to: 

  • Local independent retail, hospitality and leisure businesses occupying premises with a rateable value in excess of £20,000;
  • Bed & breakfasts which pay council tax instead of business rates;
  • Charity properties in receipt of charitable rate relief which would otherwise have been eligible for small business rate relief or rural rate relief;
  • Small businesses in shared offices or other flexible workspaces that do not pay business rates with annual rental costs of between £3,000 and £51,000;
  • Regular market traders with fixed building costs, such as rent, who do not have their own business rates assessment.

Grants of between £2,500 and £25,000 may be awarded. In line with government guidance, it is anticipated many grants will be below £10,000 to ensure the fund can benefit a larger number of businesses.

This revised policy has strict eligibility criteria including mandatory requirements set by government, which businesses will need to review before they apply. Some of the criteria are that businesses:

  • Have fewer than 50 employees and meet the requirements of being a small business as defined in Section 33 Part 2 of the Small Business. Enterprise and Employment Act 2015, and the Companies Act 2006;
  • Are able to clearly evidence a drop-in income due to Covid-19 of in excess of £750 for the quarter March 1-31 May 2020;
  • Can clearly evidence and identify ongoing fixed property-related costs, for business premises in Cheshire East, in excess of £750 for the period 1 March - 31 May 2020. This information will be used to assess applications to ensure consistency with phase one of the grant scheme;

And:

  • Operate their business from home;
  • Not breach State Aid requirements by accepting the grant;
  • Are not eligible for phase one, two or three (part one) of the council’s discretionary grant. 

Only one application will be accepted per business. Funds will not be set aside for applications submitted without adequate supporting information pending the receipt of further information.

Councillor Nick Mannion, Cheshire East Council’s cabinet member for environment and regeneration, said: “We are actively encouraging all businesses across the borough to apply for the third and last phase of the discretionary grant fund. This is the last chance for eligible businesses to gain funding to aid their revenue, it is an opportunity not to be missed.

“Cheshire East is a desirable location for businesses and our towns are the hub of the community, we want to see these businesses thrive, to overcome the hardships of Covid-19. The borough will continue to develop regeneration and infrastructure projects, investing in our towns, as we begin to look forward to the future.”

However, this funding is limited due to being in its final phase and the council may not be able to provide a grant to every eligible business and charity that applies. 

Councillor Mick Warren, Cheshire East Council’s cabinet member for communities, said:

“Our towns have been at the epicentre of the pandemic, suffering loss of income from the lockdown. The third phase of discretionary funding will provide further help to our local businesses get back on their feet.

“I would advise businesses across Cheshire East to utilise this concluding grant fund and apply as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.”

More information, including a full list of criteria and evidence required before an application can be submitted, can be found by visiting: https://form.cheshireeast.gov.uk/service/Discretionary_Grant_Phase_3_Application_Form

All applications submitted within this phase with adequate supporting information will be considered in order of receipt, and grants awarded subject to funds remaining. If you have already applied in a previous phase of the discretionary grant scheme, please do not apply again.

Young people praised ahead of A-level and GCSE results


It has been an extraordinary year by anyone’s estimation and young people have been affected significantly – so ahead of the A-level and GCSE results being announced, Cheshire East Council is paying tribute to them.

The council hopes that young people get the results they deserve and that they are able to progress with the next steps in their life journey. It is also very important to recognise the outstanding work of schools and colleges across Cheshire East to best support students to complete revised assessment arrangements this year under extremely challenging circumstances.

The positive attitude that staff have shown in working in circumstances that nobody could have predicted at the start of the year, has been nothing short of exemplary and the role that parents and carers have played in supporting that effort is something that they should also be very proud of.

Councillor Kathryn Flavell, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for children and families, said: “I am particularly proud of all the young people of Cheshire East, who have had to significantly adapt their learning approaches in order to complete their courses to the best of their abilities.

“This can be an anxious time of year for young people and this year has been challenging for everybody, especially with regards to the uncertainty of assessment arrangements. I want to thank all staff, who have worked tirelessly to support our pupils and the young people themselves, who have studied hard to achieve their potential.

“I also want to thank family members and friends, who have had an increased role at home in supporting both academic learning and the wellbeing of young people. I really hope young people get results that enable them to progress into their chosen next phase of education, apprenticeship, training or employment.”

This year the council will not be able to provide results information collectively across Cheshire East. Neither will individual schools and colleges be able to provide A-level or GCSE results, due to the impact of Covid-19 on arrangements for national examinations.

Schools and colleges will offer support and advice on next steps based on students’ results. Young people can also contact the council’s youth support service via this online form or by visiting www.cheshireeast.gov.uk and searching for ‘youth support’, which can advise on the opportunities that are available.

Cheshire East Council reviews car parking payment arrangements


Cheshire East Council is re-introducing cash payments at its car parks from Monday 17 August.

The council re-started charges at pay and display car parks in June, as a number of lockdown measures were starting to be carefully lifted. 

At this time, the option of cash (coin) payments at most car park machines, was withdrawn in order to reduce risk of virus transmission during these early stages of opening up town centres.

Since June, the council has been monitoring car park usage and has been listening to feedback from car park users, residents and businesses. Car parks have been getting progressively busier in the weeks since lockdown and people are becoming more used to visiting town centres while observing Covid safety measures.

Councillor Laura Crane, cabinet member for highways and waste said: “I would like to thank residents for using car parks responsibly since lockdown measures have been lifted.

“I continue to strongly recommend that people use cashless payment options where this is possible.

“Our parking machines offer both ‘chip and pin’ and contactless options as means of payment. We also offer the alternative option to use ‘RingGo’, the mobile app, if someone wanted to avoid using the machine completely.

“We have found that a mobile app is the preferred option for many people and are looking to improve that offer over time.

“However, we recognise that cashless options are not the best payment option for everyone, and we are now offering cash payment for those who choose to use it.

“While Covid, and the risks it presents, has not gone away, we want to support and encourage people to come back into our town centres. But this needs to be done progressively and with care, with due regard to advice from public health professionals.

“As with all changes put into place in response to the Covid pandemic, these measures are being kept under review.”

Whos Knocking At Your Door? Its Okay Not To Answer and Its Okay To Ask For Id

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Cheshire Constabulary

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Whos Knocking At Your Door? Its Okay Not To Answer and Its Okay To Ask For Id


Good morning,
I hope that you are well.
We want you know that it's okay not to answer the door anyone that you don't know. Furthermore, if you do answer the door, it's okay to ask for ID or to close the door at any point if you feel uncomfortable.
We've had reports that in near by villages (Winterley and Shavington, we've had door-to-door sales people knocking on and making residents uncomfortable by saying that they have recently been released from Prison and should buy from them.
You do not have to buy anything that you do not want to buy and can always drop us a message for a reassurance or speak to myself out and about if you need reassurance.
We care that you feel safe in your home, in your community, in your county and therefore we will be here for you!
We're lucky enough to have fabulous Neighbour Watch Teams in our villages, who are key contacts that link in with me whenever it's needed to help to keep you safe and updated as to what's happening in your area.
The intelligence that they provide, and you can provide can help us to send out messages like this to keep our community a step ahead of anything going on in the area
Thank you for your time.
To report any crime, please call 101 or 999 always in emergencies. You can email me intelligence on lizzie.jolley@cheshire.pnn.police.uk
If you do email intelligence, please include your name, DOB, address and time and date of occurrence.
Kind regards,
PCSO Lizzie Jolley 22582

Thursday, 6 August 2020

Walking and cycling schemes to boost Cheshire East’s Covid-19 recovery


Cheshire East Council has revealed its first active travel projects as part of plans to support the borough through recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.

Nine new schemes will come into effect this month as a first phase to improve routes to schools and workplaces, boost social distancing, encourage walking and cycling and improve access our town centres. Measures will also help to reserve capacity on public transport for those who really need it and should help to reduce congestion on some key routes to schools. Further schemes will be developed in further phases, following pledged government funding of up to £619,000.

The move follows recent submissions by town and parish councils and local members of more than 500 local ideas as to what measures may work in their towns and villages.

The first nine active travel schemes, totalling investment of £155,000, will be located at:

Coronation Street, Crewe, near Sir William Stanier School – 20mph zone and through traffic restricted to cyclists and pedestrians;

Crewe town centre – improved access for cycles;

Congleton town centre – improved access for cycles;

Macclesfield town centre – improved access for cycles;

Ivy Road, Macclesfield – through traffic restricted to buses, cyclists and pedestrians;

Hawthorn Lane, Wilmslow – through traffic restricted to cyclists and pedestrians;

Old Middlewich Road, Sandbach – 20mph zone and parking suspension;

Ladies Mile, Knutsford – through traffic restricted to cyclists and pedestrians; and

Lodge Road, Alsager – through traffic restricted to cyclists and pedestrians.

Councillor Laura Crane, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for highways and waste, said: “This is exciting news and the part of steps by this council to promote social distancing and encourage more people to get active and cycle and walk more.

“I would like again to thank everyone who has worked with us so quickly to get active travel ideas and proposals up and running so swiftly in our towns and villages.

“We know people’s travel behaviour has changed during the lockdown – and we are determined to lock in the benefits of more people walking and cycling to make our town centres safer, healthier and more welcoming to shoppers and visitors.

“We have seen an increase in more people walking and cycling in our borough and as more people turn to these active ways of travel, we need to work together to provide safe spaces for people to carry out these journeys.

“These initial projects are, by their very nature and the short timescales involved, an experiment. We will continue to work with the town and parish councils to develop, review and refine these measures and others, as appropriate, before anything becomes permanent.

“Our aim is to deliver schemes that are right for each town and developed in partnership with each local area and local members.”

Councillor Suzie Akers Smith, Cheshire East Council’s walking and cycling champion, said: “Ditching the car and taking up daily active travel is good for your health, good for the environment and good for promoting social distancing to combat Covid-19. Creating a safe environment will encourage people out of their cars and be more active.

“It also helps make our town centres safer and more attractive places to visit, spend time and spend money.

“There has never been a better time to walk or cycle – especially shorter journeys included as part of our daily activity – and this really helps to forge greener habits, to reduce congestion, improve air quality and help fight climate change.

“Being bold in these measures may attract additional funding from government and we welcome feedback both positive and negative on the measures being proposed.”

The council aims to develop a series of projects, informed by discussions with town and parish councils and ward members, that will be delivered in coming weeks, including:

● Pop-up cycle lanes, with protected spaces for cycling;

● Measures to reduce rat-running in streets;

● Improved walking and cycling routes to school;

● Safer junctions, with the potential for bus and cycle-only corridors;

● Implementing lower speed limits; and

● Wider pavements, which also enables social distancing.

Schemes being considered as part of the second phase of active travel improvements to be constructed in the Autumn, subject to the Council receiving DfT funding include:

· Manchester Road between Wilmslow and Handforth;

· Vernon Way, Mill Street and Nantwich Road in Crewe;

· Black Lane, Manchester Road and Sunderland Street in Macclesfield;

· High Street in Sandbach;

· West Street and Mill Street in Congleton;

· Various streets on the Knutsford Revolution Cycle Route;

· London Road between Alderley Edge and Wilmslow;

· St Ann’s Road in Middlewich

Detailed plans for active travel measures can be found on the following website: https://cheshireeastactivetravel.commonplace.is/

Council welcomes funding for Alderley Park development


Cheshire East Council has welcomed the announcement on 4 August 2020, of £15.5 million of the Getting Building Fund for investment in schemes in Cheshire and Warrington, one of which is a new Validation Centre of Excellence at Alderley Park. 

The Council has worked with Cheshire and Warrington Local Enterprise Partnership (C+W LEP) to identify ‘shovel-ready’ infrastructure projects that will support sub-regional economic recovery and local businesses, as set out in the Government’s ‘New Deal’ programme for Britain. 

Building on the success of the Medicines Discovery Catapult led Lighthouse Lab, Medicines Discovery Catapult and Alderley Park will create a new Validation Centre of Excellence for innovative diagnostics, biomarkers and complex medicines and develop the UK’s onshore diagnostic capability and capacity and the associated supply chain.

The project incorporates the creation of specialist laboratories, including a Category 3 biosafety facility for testing of new diagnostics, biomarkers and therapeutics for highly infectious pathogens, including respiratory viruses such as Covid-19.

The council is playing a key partnership role to support this scheme with flexibility to provide the greatest economic benefits to the area. It is essential to promote and finance green infrastructure projects across the borough, particularly Investing in critical research facilities to help combat the pandemic to influence economic recovery.

Councillor Craig Browne, deputy leader of Cheshire East Council, said: “The council is committed to supporting scientific research and innovation in Cheshire East, home to cutting-edge life science facilities that are internationally acclaimed for their highly skilled workforce.

“This investment recognises the significance of these leading projects and the fundamental role that Cheshire East can play in fighting life changing and life-threatening infections, including Covid-19.”

Dr Kath Mackay, managing director of Bruntwood SciTech - Alderley Park, said: “It’s brilliant that Alderley Park has been recognised by the government for its world-leading facilities and scientific capabilities. This additional investment will help us to continue building our life science cluster at the park and will enable us to play a key role in stimulating economic growth within the region and UK.”

Professor Peter Simpson, chief scientific officer at Medicines Discovery Catapult, said: "I am delighted with this funding, that will enable us to extend the state-of-the-art lab capabilities, which we already offer to companies and innovators in this region. The Validation Centre will enable translational research for new therapeutics and diagnostics that will improve the UK's response to major health challenges. This will become a fantastic new life science asset in Cheshire East.”