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Monday, 18 September 2017

Murder in Cheshire

Lots of innocent badger will be murdered in Cheshire as the badger cull comes to Cheshire.

Join the local group and help to save the badgers  We need information if you know any farms who are culling or see any cages being delivered or information on shooters locations you can fill in the form and let use know http://www.crewetown.co.uk/inform.htm 

badgerfin

Here are some facts behind the badger culling:

  • Free shooting has been applied as a killing method as it is the most "cost effective". In fact, this method is also the most questionable and inhumane method of killing badgers as minimum training and supervision is requested from the culling companies. In recent years reports have shown that 7.4%-22.8% of badgers took more than 5 minutes to die.

  • None of the badgers killed during the current trials have been tested for TB, making both healthy and infected animals become targeted. Thus with no data published on how many killed badgers are infected with TB, effectiveness of culling is highly questionable.

  • “perturbation effect” can result in wide spread of TB as survivors of the killed badgers might roam more widely causing spread of TB into new areas. The trial from 2007 concluded that culling badgers: “can make no meaningful contribution to cattle TB control in Britain” (You can find full trial in here)

  • Extending badger culling into new areas: South Devon, North Devon, North Cornwall, West Dorset, and South Herefordshire creates an even greater threat for the badger population in England.



DISTRESSING footage of a caged badger bleeding to death has emerged as campaigners say it reveals the cruel reality of Britain's culling.

The clip shows a large badger, found in Devon last week, with bloodied fur trapped in a cage in an apparent breach of strict culling rules.

 Footage shows a large bloodied badger bloodied trapped in a cage in an apparent breach of strict culling rules

Stop The Badger Cull


Footage shows a large bloodied badger bloodied trapped in a cage in an apparent breach of strict culling rules

The animal, believed to have been caught at night, was still in the trap at 1.20pm the next day, animal group Stop The Badger Cull said.

Activists claimed its body was still warm to the touch.

It comes as the government last week issued licences to cull more badgers to tackle Bovine Tuberculosis.

The scheme was expanded this year to 11 new areas in Devon, Wiltshire, Somerset, Dorset and Cheshire, and could see up to 33,000 badgers killed.

 Queen's Brian May slammed the bloodthirsty methods calling it a 'criminal waste of taxpayers’ money'


Queen's Brian May slammed the bloodthirsty methods calling it a 'criminal waste of taxpayers’ money'

Queen guitarist and campaigner Brian May slammed the bloodthirsty methods calling it a "criminal waste of taxpayers’ money”.

Commenting on the sickening footage he said: “I’m sure I’m not alone in finding these pictures very painful. It’s pitiful to see these magnificent creatures being destroyed.”

 Campaigners say caged trapping 'cannot be done humanely'

Stop The Badger Cull


Campaigners say caged trapping 'cannot be done humanely'

He added: “The case for killing wildlife as part of a strategy for cleaning up herds of cattle is incredibly weak, and a huge doubt hangs over this policy. Yet this government ploughs ahead as if they are blindfolded.

“This is a tragic waste of ­innocent lives, which will not help farmers or cattle, and it’s a criminal waste of taxpayers’ money.”

Opponents say culling is inhumane and vaccinating badgers would be more effective in preventing TB's spread.

 Strict culling rules states they must not have any 'unnecessary suffering'

Stop The Badger Cull


Strict culling rules states they must not have any 'unnecessary suffering'

Jay Tiernan from Stop The Cull said: “This makes a farce of the idea it is being done to stop disease because protocols are being ignored across the cull zones.

“We are seeing evidence now that caged trapping cannot be done humanely. The people undertaking the cull are amateurs and have scant regard for animal welfare.”

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, states: “Cage traps set to catch must be checked and any badgers caught must be dealt with as soon as practicable after dawn the following day.

"Operators have a legal responsibility under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 not to cause unnecessary suffering to any animal under the control of man – this includes a wild animal held in a trap."


MYTHBUSTERS

Myth: Badgers are the main source of TB in cattle

Truth: The population of badgers with TB is relatively small. With that being said, only 5.7% of all bTB outbreaks have been the direct result of transmission from badgers to cattle. This equally means that 94.3% of all bTB outbreaks come from alternate sources. Badgers, however, are still the subject of unrelenting culling campaigns that cannot possibly eradicate bTB if they only cause 5.7% of all bTB outbreaks. We believe that 5.7% can be significantly lowered, if not removed altogether by an effective vaccination strategy and testing of badgers. At the Badger Trust we believe that the source of the other 94.3% of outbreaks needs to be the primary focus of DEFRA’s strategy.

Myth: Culling is the most effective way to reduce bTB outbreaks in cattle.

Truth: As already mentioned, only 5.7% of bTB outbreaks in cattle are caused by direct transmission from badgers. Spending 50 million of taxpayer funds to kill mostly healthy badgers cannot possibly eradicate bovine tuberculosis as 80% of the culled badgers do not carry TB. We firmly believe that a vaccination and testing strategy for badgers would have a much better effect and most of that 50 million could go towards an effective strategy against the main causes and transmission of bTB. It has already been shown in Wales that tighter control on cattle movements, regular and thorough testing has shown a drop of 30% in bTB incidents. Similarly, vaccination programmes in humans has led to human TB being largely wiped out. There is no reason a similar strategy could not work for cattle and badgers alike. Currently, Welsh herds are 94% bTB free without culling badgers.

Myth: Badgers being culled have TB and are a risk to cattle

Truth: The truth is simple, 80% of the badgers being culled in England and Wales do not carry TB and vaccination programmes can effectively lower the risk and even prevent these badgers from ever

carrying TB. The risk to cattle from getting bTB from badgers is already low. Scotland is a great example of this; in the 1980s badgers in Scotland that were victims of traffic accidents were tested for TB. While 1 in 48 tested positive the incidents of bTB in cattle were extremely low and often linked to cattle coming in from England, Wales and Ireland. Despite TB in badgers, the strict testing of cattle and import controls meant that in 2009 Scotland was declared bTB free.

Myth: Badgers that carry TB are in pain, suffering, and will lead to a slow and painful death.

Truth: Most badgers that test positive for TB will be latent carriers. This means that they are not suffering any symptoms. They may be infected with TB but do not have the disease and a very small percentage will ever develop symptoms. Any animal that is in pain and suffering should be addressed by a trained veterinary professional.

Myth: The Badger Trust cares more about badgers than it does cattle

Truth: The Badger Trust is made up of individuals, volunteers, and staff who are passionate about the welfare of many animals in addition to badgers. While our mission is to protect, conserve, and educate the public about badgers and their habitats we do not wish any harm to come to other species. We understand that farmers have a duty of care to their cattle and are just as passionate about their cattle as we are about badgers. For both the health and safety of cattle and badgers we would like to see a constructive and viable solution to the TB crisis. At the Badger Trust we feel that the government is simply appeasing farmers and not giving them the solution they need and deserve. The science has made it clear that culling is not an effective strategy and that other combinations are more effective. To put it simply bTB is a complex issue with complex answers, there is no one simple solution or the issue of culling (that has happened for decades) would have surely been solved by now. We wish to see a solution that doesn’t appease one cause at the expense of another and that gives long lasting and viable solutions to the bTB crisis with as few cattle and badgers killed as possible.


have friends

The 22nd ‘Annual Community Duck Race

Reporter  Jonathan White, Wistaston

The annual Duck and Boats’ races were postponed on 9th September because of the inclement weather – too wet for ducks!

The 22nd ‘Annual Community Duck Race and Children's Model Boat Race’ took place on Saturday 16th September 2017, at the Joey the Swan Recreation ground in Wistaston. The guests of honour were the Rose Queen and her Attendant.

The event was organised by members of the Wistaston Community Council. The sponsors were Wistonia Electrical & Security Ltd with a generous local charity donation from the new Wistaston Co-op.

The event was officially opened by the Wistaston Rose Queen (Jessica Doano) and her Attendant (Elise Kennerley).

44 model boats were entered into the Children's Model Boat Race and 640 plastic duck race tickets (£1 each) were sold and entered into the Duck Race.

Proceeds will go to the funds of Wistaston Community Council, Wistaston Memorial Hall & Community Centre, and several local charities.

There were also 15 stalls featuring local charities and organisations, selling an assortment of goods or advertising their activities.

Several hundred people attended the event, which took place in warm sunshine.

Here are the results in full:

Children's Model Boat Race (44 model boats entered):

a) Best designed children's model boat (judged by Wistaston Rose Queen, Jessica Doano and her Attendant, Elise Kennerley):

1st – ‘Blue torpedo' by Ollie and Toby from Wistaston who won £10 and a trophy. They said "We like our boat. We hope it will be the fastest boat".

2nd place – 'The queen of hearts' by Mia.

3rd place – ‘Viking longboat’ by Harry and Isabelle.

b) Children's Model Boat Race:

1st – Jessica Chesters who won £10, plus a trophy donated by Herbert Locke MBE.

2nd place – Wilson Hadzik who won £8.

3rd place – Perdita Jones who won £6.

Duck Race (640 tickets sold):

1st – No.283 – Natasha Nuttall who won £100, plus a trophy donated by Les Fothergill, a past Wistonian of the Year.

2nd – No.467 – Liah Wood - £50.

3rd – No.623 – Maisie Pownall - £25.

There was an enthusiastic commentary on both races by Dane Chaplow, with ongoing excitement and incident around every corner as ducks and boats bobbed and weaved along the obstacle course.

A representative from Wistaston Community Council said, “This was our first attempt at organising the Duck Race, which has been a popular, community event for twenty-two years. We were able to follow the long-standing procedures from the past and thank, most sincerely, all the volunteers who made it a quacking success. We were pleased that it was a sunny day, following the wet postponement on 9th September. We are so grateful to the sponsors - Wistonia Electrical & Security Ltd, the new Wistaston Co-op and Crewe Movie Makers.”

Best designed childrens model boat winners with Wistaston Rose Queen and Attendant.JPG


Aerial view of the event at the  Joey the Swan Recreation groundStart of Childrens Model Boat  RaceStart of Duck Race

1980's Electronica tribute band 'Electro 80s'

1980's Electronica tribute band 'Electro 80s' - http://www.electro80s.com/ - will perform a fund-raising concert at 'The Studio Nightclub & Entertainment Venue' in Nantwich on Friday 22nd September 2017.

Electro 80s will recreate songs by artists such as Depeche Mode, Yazoo, Gary Numan, Duran Duran, Ultravox, Devo, Soft Cell and The Human League.

Entry is by donation and money raised will go to St Luke's Cheshire Hospice https://www.stlukes-hospice.co.uk/ in Winsford.

Nigel Woodhouse, Director of Operations at The Studio, said, " It is always a pleasure having Electro80s playing the venue, as their professionalism along with their ability and energy always makes for a great show. The concert is free entry with donations going to St Luke's Cheshire Hospice. It will be a feel good night to relive the electronic music age of the 80s."

The Studio - Electro80s

Friday, 15 September 2017

Dementia Reablement Service attracts Japanese interest


Cheshire East Council’s acclaimed dementia reablement service has attracted international attention.

Mr Tsuneo Inoue, an authority on long-term older people care in Japan, met with service members and team leaders to learn more about the work carried out by the council to support residents living with dementia, their carers and families.

Cheshire East is one of the few councils in the country to deliver bespoke intervention and support for families and individuals, where the onset of early-stage dementia has begun to impact on their lives.

An evaluation report by Liverpool John Moores University said of the service: “It has successfully arrested decline and provided a stabilising effect on a general sense of wellbeing and overall quality of life.”

Mr Tsuneo, a lecturer in social protection policy at Doshisha University, met with Neil and Linda McKellar, from Sandbach.  Mr McKellar was diagnosed with vascular dementia two years ago and found out about the council’s reablement service while visiting a memory café.

He also met with Councillor Janet Clowes, cabinet member for adult social care and integration. 

Councillor Clowes said: “Cheshire East Council’s dementia reablement service seeks to set the highest standards in the way in which we support our residents with dementia and their families.

“Dementia is one of the biggest challenges faced by all local authorities and, as a borough with an ageing population, we want to make sure that all those people affected by dementia receive all the professional support they deserve.

“Helping people to live well and for longer is a core strand of the council’s health and wellbeing strategy. It is about supporting independence and quality of life.”

Cheshire East Council’s dementia reablement service was set up in 2015 and handled more than 500 referrals in its first 11 months of operation. That number has now risen to 1,572.

Municipal authorities in Japan are faced with similar challenges to the UK when assessing how best to support people with dementia. Cheshire East’s model is an early intervention short-term process, in which trained professionals prepare a support plan to help those with early dementia and their carers to access a wide range of services, including technology and dementia-friendly shops, supermarkets and leisure activities.

The service seeks to empower people with early dementia to have the confidence to manage independently and to bring about a quality of life for them and their families.

For more information about Cheshire East Council’s dementia reablement service visit www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/dementiareablement

Spoken Word film speaks volumes about attitudes to adults at risk of abuse


A powerful short film, produced through Cheshire East Council, which highlights the concerns faced by ‘people at risk’, has been praised by national experts.

Spoken Word is a poignant ‘talking heads’ video in which several people, who access services talk about their experiences of adult abuse, prejudices and patronising attitudes.

They describe the distress and anxiety this can cause them.

Dr Adi Cooper, a leading authority on adult safeguarding, is the latest expert to praise the film, which was produced by service users of the Cheshire East Safeguarding Adults Board.

She has just published her latest book – co-edited with Emily White – and has included text from the film.  Dr Cooper said: “The ‘Spoken Word’ video communicates powerfully some straightforward messages about how important it is to hear what is being said by people who not always listened to, about their lives and what is important to them.

“We have used their words, at the start of our new book, about safeguarding adults to make it really clear to all the readers that talking with – and listening to – people comes first in all adult safeguarding work.”

The Spoken Word is based on a poem produced by adults at risk who came together in workshops to discuss the personal experiences they had encountered in everyday life.

They then delivered their powerful and moving messages directly to camera at the Axis Arts Centre, part of Manchester Metropolitan University’s Crewe Campus.

Since going public, the film has received great acclaim from social and health care professionals, mental health and adult abuse experts around the country.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for adult integration, said: “I am very pleased that this film has been so well received by other agencies around the country and that it will be used in the training programmes that are so vital to ensuring that staff working with vulnerable adults have all the professional skills required to care for their service users.

“Rarely do we get to hear the true experiences and thoughts of vulnerable adults from their own lips and this short film sends out a very powerful message to us all that they are equal members of society and deserve respect, kindness and care like everyone else.”

The lasting message from the film is clear, powerful and poignant – Speak Up, Speak Out, Stop Adult Abuse!

Adults at risk that have viewed the film have also commented on how it has encouraged them to report their concerns to their adult social care service.

The film can be viewed on the Cheshire East Safeguarding Adults Board website at: http://www.stopadultabuse.org.uk/home.aspx

Cheshire authorities work to reduce fraud


A new initiative to safeguard vulnerable residents in Cheshire will be launched on Monday.

Cheshire East Council’s trading standards team is joining forces with the police, the three other Cheshire borough councils and financial institutions to identify customers who are being defrauded, and to implement safeguarding procedures to prevent the loss of funds.

The four authorities involved in providing the banking protocol are Cheshire East, Cheshire West and Chester, Halton and Warrington Councils.

The scheme has been developed to protect our vulnerable residents. It is a sad fact that criminals will prey on our most vulnerable residents and pressurise them into paying extortionate amounts for goods and services that they don’t need.

Councillor Paul Bates, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for communities and health, said: “Financial fraud is a modern problem which this authority will stop at nothing to challenge.

“This shouldn’t be and isn’t just an issue for the police to tackle. Cheshire East Council’s trading standards team has had a number of successes protecting consumers from things like online fraud, doorstep crime and scams and has shown that working together in partnership can make a really positive difference.

“Along with our colleagues in the other partner authorities for the banking protocol, we will do all we can to protect people in Cheshire.”

The trading standards team, who are a key partner on this project, will be ensuring that financial sector staff receive further training to identify suspicious transactions.

For further information on the banking protocol, please call Cheshire East Council’s trading standards team on 0300 123 5015.

SEAHORSE SWIMMING CLUB HONOURED WITH QUEEN'S AWARD

Seahorse 2

Volunteers at Seahorse Swimming Club have been honoured by Royalty with the Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service for 2017.

The award was made on behalf of the Queen by the Lord Lieutenant of Cheshire, Mr. David Briggs MBE on 7th September at the Lifestyle Centre. The award is equivalent to the MBE and the highest award a voluntary group can receive. It was created in 2002 to celebrate the Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

The voluntary-led group, which cater for people with disabilities, was formed in 1956 at the Flag lane Baths. The aim of the Club is to encourage its members to gain confidence in the water, learn to swim and further develop their skills.

Seahorse volunteers Jackie Roberts and Steph Evanson attended the Garden Party at Buckingham Palace in May with other award winners from across the country, where they were in the company of the Queen and other members of the Royal Family.

Seahorse has over 80 members which include swimmers and volunteers. They meet on Thursday evenings at the Lifestyle Centre. The 25 volunteers of all ages provide a safe and pleasant environment for the swimmers. Their roles vary from assisting swimmers in the pool, encouraging them from the poolside and helping behind the scenes by organizing galas, social and fundraising events.

Joining the volunteers for the presentation was the Mayor of Cheshire East Council, Cllr Arthur Moran and the Mayor of Crewe Town Council, Cllr Diane Yates. John Lea from Mornflake Oats and Rotarians Neil Fearn (President), Ray Stafford MBE and Frank Baldwin were also present to offer their congratulations, as well as several former volunteers, which included Mrs Margaret Platt who is one of Seahorses’ founder members.

“Everyone at Seahorse is extremely proud to receive this award. It is recognition for the commitment and enthusiasm of all the volunteers who have helped out. The Club relies on volunteers and it’s thanks to them that people with disabilities are given opportunities to exercise, socialize, have fun, freedom and a challenge in the water which is often denied to those who are unable to move freely." - Gareth Roberts, Secretary.

Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Cheshire East steps closer to state-of-the-art history centre


Cheshire East has taken a big step closer towards the creation of a new state-of-the art history centre to host the region’s archive.

Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, a shared service of Cheshire East Council and Cheshire West and Chester Council (CWaC), needs a new home as its current one in Duke Street, Chester, is no longer fit for purpose.

Under proposals approved by Cheshire East’s cabinet today – and set for consideration by CWaC’s cabinet tomorrow – the archive would be rehoused in two new bespoke history centres, with one in Crewe and one in Chester.

These would be climate-controlled environments to house the collections, better display them and make them more interactive and accessible to the public.

The archive ranges from the middle ages to the present day and includes archives that would fill 8km of shelving from businesses, schools, hospitals and local clubs and organisations. In addition, it has tens of thousands of photographs, maps and books covering all aspects of Cheshire’s history.

The £13m joint scheme, if approved, would see each authority contribute £4.2m each with the remainder of the money being sought via a bid for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant.

Crewe’s history centre would be located at the old library site in the town centre. The proposed site for Chester’s new history centre is the former Business Enterprise site on Hoole Road.

Councillor David Brown, Cheshire East Council deputy leader and cabinet member responsible for archives, said: “I am delighted both cabinets have backed proposals to replace the current facility, which is no longer fit for purpose for the long-term preservation of our unique archives. These two new history centres in Crewe and Chester would be key to delivering an accessible, up-to-date and improved joint archive service.

“It’s an exciting proposal not just for Crewe but for the whole of Cheshire East in terms of its potential to greatly improve the offer to residents and making our unique and precious archives far more accessible for Cheshire East residents and visitors alike. It would also provide a place for our extensive railway and engineering archives – which are a nationally significant collection and central to the story of Crewe’s development.

“With an HS2 hub station coming and the council working with partners to deliver an impressive £48.3m investment in regeneration of the town centre, these are exciting times for Crewe.”

Under the proposals the new centres would incorporate facilities for exhibitions, events, research and more space for volunteers, while also allowing for the better preservation of the county’s rich written heritage. The proposal also sees the service developing plans to make the archives more accessible throughout the county through an expanded outreach programme and digital access.

The Crewe history centre would specifically reflect the story and heritage of the communities of Cheshire East. This would include: a large gallery space to host cultural exhibitions of regional and national interest, workshops and talks; railway/engineering archives for Crewe and the local region; access to film and sound archives; local newspapers and photographs, supervised access to archive materials not on display and a potential home for the Family History Society of Cheshire, with access to its genealogical resources and expertise.

Subject to a successful bid for HLF funding, the proposed new facilities would open by 2023.

New website simplifies access to advice and support for residents


Cheshire East Council has launched a new online resource which improves access to information, advice and support to help residents ‘live well’.

Live Well Cheshire East includes information and advice covering a range of subjects such as health matters, community activities, care and support for adults, children’s services and the local offer for special educational needs and disabilities.

The site features an easy-to-use directory that brings together services, support and activities which residents can access across the borough.

The new directory signposts residents to a range of support services including home care, equipment and services to keep people safe and living independently at home for longer, as well as clubs and activities. Information about benefits and money management is also available.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cheshire East Council cabinet member for social care and integration, said: “The new website has been designed to be as simple and user friendly as possible, which will be reassuring for residents who may not be familiar with using an online service.

“The site can also be used by those who wish to access advice and services on behalf of a family member in need of support.

“I am confident that the website will also support our many offline sources of information by providing relevant advice and support in an easy-to-use and straightforward manner.”

Cheshire East will be providing public information events at the following locations from 10am-2pm:

· Tesco Extra, Vernon Way, Crewe, Monday, September 18;

· Congleton High Street, Tuesday, September 19;

· Poynton Civic Centre, Wednesday, September 20;

· Sandbach Town Hall, Thursday, September 21;

· Macclesfield Town Hall, Friday, September 22; and

· Nantwich town square, Saturday, September 23.

Further information on how to ‘live well’ can also be found at:

livewell.cheshireeast.gov.uk

Storm Aileen – Information Bulletin


Cheshire East Council’s highways teams have been busy during the night dealing with a number of fallen trees, which have blocked roads, but the borough appears to have escaped the scale of damage which has occurred in other parts of the country.

Flooding has blocked the A533 Booth Lane between Middlewich and Sandbach and motorists are advised to avoid the area.  Highways teams are currently dealing with a fallen tree in Siddington near Macclesfield.

High winds and rain continue to make driving conditions difficult and motorists are advised to take extra care.

Storm Aileen set to bring strong winds to Cheshire

Subject: Storm Aileen set to bring strong winds to Cheshire


This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch. This information has been sent on behalf of Cheshire Constabulary

(Please do not reply or forward this email directly; please use the Reply, Share buttons at the bottom of this message)

Message sent by

Rachel Bradshaw (Cheshire Police, Digital Media Officer, Co)

Cheshire Police is warning residents to be prepared after the Met Office issued an Amber weather warning for Cheshire.
Storm Aileen is due to arrive later today, Tuesday 12 September, with forecasters predicting of winds of up to 75mph.
The warning for Cheshire is due to come into force at 8.00pm with winds expected to reach 50-60mph across the county. The peak of the storm is due to hit in the early hours of Wednesday 13 September, when gust of 65-75mph expected.
Inspector Richard Rees from Cheshire Police said “Thankfully the worst of Storm Aileen is set to hit Cheshire during the early hours of Wednesday morning, which should minimise the impact of the disruption.
“However, with winds expected to reach 75mph, fallen trees and power lines are likely, which may result in road closures. Therefore I would advise all motorists to allow extra time for their journey on Wednesday morning and take extra care while travelling.”
Anyone looking to report a power failure is advised to call the national helpline on 105.
To report a fallen tree you should contact your local authority via the numbers below:
Cheshire West and Chester
Tree fault helpline: 0300 123 7027
Highways out of hours no: 0300 123 7036
Report online: https://maps.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk/cwac/faultreporting/
Cheshire East
Highways (8:30am – 5:00pm): 0300 123 5020
Highways out of hours no: 0300 123 5025
Report online https://www.cheshireeasthighways.org/report-it-general.aspx
Halton Borough Council
General helpline: 0303 333 4300 (Monday to Friday 8am to 6pm)
Out of hours emergency number: 0333 000 4400
Warrington Borough Council
General helpline: 01925 443322
To keep up to date with the latest weather forecast visit: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/

Cheshire East steps closer to state-of-the-art history centre


Cheshire East has taken a step closer towards the creation of a new state-of-the art history centre to host the region’s archive.

Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, a shared service of Cheshire East Council and Cheshire West and Chester Council (CWaC), needs a new home as its current one in Duke Street, Chester, is no longer fit for purpose.

Under proposals approved by Cheshire East’s cabinet today – and set for consideration by CWaC’s cabinet tomorrow – the archive would be rehoused in two new bespoke history centres, with one in Crewe and one in Chester.

These would be climate-controlled environments to house the collections, better display them and make them more interactive and accessible to the public.

The archive ranges from the middle ages to the present day and includes archives that would fill 8km of shelving from businesses, schools, hospitals and local clubs and organisations. In addition, it has tens of thousands of photographs, maps and books covering all aspects of Cheshire’s history.

The £13m joint scheme, if approved, would see each authority contribute £4.2m each with the remainder of the money being sought via a bid for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant.

Crewe’s history centre would be located at the old library site in the town centre. The proposed site for Chester’s new history centre is the former Business Enterprise site on Hoole Road.

Councillor David Brown, Cheshire East Council deputy leader and cabinet member responsible for archives, said: “I am delighted our cabinet has backed proposals to replace the current facility, which is no longer fit for purpose for the long-term preservation of our unique archives. These two new history centres in Crewe and Chester would be key to delivering an accessible, up-to-date and improved joint archive service.

“It’s an exciting proposal not just for Crewe but for the whole of Cheshire East in terms of its potential to greatly improve the offer to residents and making our unique and precious archives far more accessible for Cheshire East residents and visitors alike. It would also provide a place for our extensive railway and engineering archives – which are a nationally significant collection and central to the story of Crewe’s development.

“With an HS2 hub station coming and the council working with partners to deliver an impressive £48.3m investment in regeneration of the town centre, these are exciting times for Crewe.”

Under the proposals the new centres would incorporate facilities for exhibitions, events, research and more space for volunteers, while also allowing for the better preservation of the county’s rich written heritage. The proposal also sees the service developing plans to make the archives more accessible throughout the county through an expanded outreach programme and digital access.

The Crewe history centre would specifically reflect the story and heritage of the communities of Cheshire East. This would include: a large gallery space to host cultural exhibitions of regional and national interest, workshops and talks; railway/engineering archives for Crewe and the local region; access to film and sound archives; local newspapers and photographs, supervised access to archive materials not on display and a potential home for the Family History Society of Cheshire, with access to its genealogical resources and expertise.

Subject to a successful bid for HLF funding, the proposed new facilities would open by 2023.

Look out for your local Connected Communities centre


Venues across Cheshire East will soon become ‘Connected Communities centres’ in a scheme to make a wider range of activities and support services more locally available.

As part of the council’s Connected Communities strategy, more than £150,000 has been pledged to help community venues develop the services they offer and encourage more people to use them.

From coffee mornings, computer classes and line dancing, to learning a language, sharing a problem and support for stroke sufferers – there’s something for everyone.

Every centre will also have a computer tablet connected to our Live Well community information website, helping residents to easily find out what’s available in the area.

The first Connected Communities centres are inviting local residents to have a look at what’s on offer at open days as follows:

● Friday, September 22 – Barnies, St Barnabas Hall, West Street, Crewe. Open from 10am to 2pm with official opening ceremony at noon. For more information about what’s

on at Barnies, ring Lesley on 07949 240371;

● Friday, September 29 – Welcome Café, Longridge, Knutsford. Open 4pm to 6pm. For

more information visit: thewelcome.org.uk or ring 01565 750905;

● Saturday, September 30 – St John’s Church, Weston Estate, Wilwick Lane, Macclesfield. Open from 11am to 1pm. For more information visit: stjohnsmacclesfield.org.uk or ring 01625 612511.

The Bridgend Centre, Bollington, has also become a Connected Communities centre, since September 1. More information at: bridgendcentre.org.uk or ring 01625 576311.

Councillor Paul Bates, cabinet member for finance and communities, said: “We are thrilled to see the first Connected Communities centres offering a much wider range of services more locally to people across the borough.

“This initiative is very much a partnership between the council and community, working together to ensure the right services, support and infrastructure are in the right places. What works well in one area won’t necessarily work in another, so it’s about being responsive to local need and finding solutions that work for everyone.

“We want everyone to live the best life they can in Cheshire East and have access to social, health, work and leisure opportunities near to where they live. Please do look out for a Connected Communities centre near you and do go along and find out what’s on offer for you, family and friends.”

The council is working with community venues and partnerships across the borough to open up to 30 centres over the next 12 months.

For more information about the centres, contact our communities team via email at: communities@cheshireeast.gov.uk or ring 01270 685880.

Public Spaces Protection Order for dog fouling and dog control – a consistent approach across Cheshire East


Cheshire East Council has today opened a public consultation to seek residents’ views around the introduction of a Public Space Protection Order (PSPO) specifically to tackle dog fouling and dog control across the borough.

The proposed PSPO will enable the council to more-effectively combat dog fouling and introduce certain dog control requirements. We do recognise that most dog owners are responsible and would like to thank them for their continued support in helping to keep our public areas clean.

What are the main features of the proposed PSPO?

The PSPO would allow the council to:

· Ban dog fouling in all public places within Cheshire East borough;

· Allow authorised officers to tell a dog owner/walker to put and keep their dog on a lead if necessary, for example, if their dog was showing aggressive behaviour;

· Issue a Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN) of up to £100 and failure to pay the FPN may lead to prosecution and a potential maximum fine of £1,000, as would more serious breaches of the PSPO.

Why do we want to introduce this new PSPO for dog fouling and control?

Cheshire East Council has a statutory duty to keep land clear of litter and refuse (including dog fouling) and a duty of care for dealing with waste. We also have a duty to take action against irresponsible individuals who fail to clear up after their dogs on land which is open to the public. Not only is dog mess highly unpleasant, it is also a hazard to health – particularly to children.  

Introducing the PSPO would allow the council to replace and extend the existing dog controls and byelaws. This will give a consistent approach across the borough to dog fouling as well as introduce dog control requirements, to encourage responsible dog ownership, to ensure that everyone is able to enjoy our open areas, country parks and public spaces safely.

Consultation Details

This consultation will run for four weeks from Today (September 12) until October 10, 2017. Before bringing the PSPO into effect, the council will consider the responses to this public consultation. If the PSPO is brought into effect, the council would publicise this ahead of the implementation date.

Link to consultation survey:  Dog fouling and control PSPO survey

The link will be on the homepage of the council’s website www.cheshireeast.gov.uk in the ‘Have Your Say’ section.

Help to fill in the survey

If you need further information or help with the survey, please ring our anti-social behaviour team on 0300 123 50 30 or email them at: safer@cheshireeast.gov.uk

Saturday, 9 September 2017

We have imported hell on earth. We are witnessing the rape of Britain's daughters.

Bradford West Labour MP Naz Shah sent out a tweet telling the young white girls in Rotherham,who have been abused by the Muslim Rape Gangs,to ‘shut their mouths for the good of diversity’ - just days after attacking a fellow party member for speaking out over the issue.That an MP would state this is simply beyond belief.

We should be encouraging all rape victims to come forward and report it,so the men responsible for these vile acts can be prosecuted,jailed and taken off the streets.Sadly it seems that the Labour Party are more concerned in maintaining their Muslim vote, rather than protecting vulnerable,working class girls from the grooming gangs.

Shockingly not one MP or MEP of ANY party has stepped forward to condemn Naz Shah for her outrageous remarks.The Labour Party have not disciplined her and she has not been asked to withraw the comments and apologise.

The only national politician speaking out is Anne Marie Waters, who is standing to be the Leader of UKIP. She has called for Naz Shah to be sacked.

On the grooming gangs she has said this,

"We have imported hell on earth.

We are witnessing the rape of Britain's daughters. We should stand up and fight for them."

At last we have a national politician who is saying publicly what millions are thinking.

Anne Marie Waters will shake up British politics and be a voice for the millions who have been ignored for far too long.

Yours faithfully,

Cllr Brian Silvester

UKIP Councillor

11 Rimsdale Close

Rope. CW2 6RS

Tel 07760147609

Borough’s burgeoning visitor economy at best level ever


Cheshire East’s burgeoning visitor economy continues to grow, with a 6.3 per cent leap in 2016 placing the total value of hospitality and visitor revenue at £895m.

A record 16 million visitors passed through the borough, a rise of 4.9 per cent, with the Tour of Britain international cycle race, festivals and many other events and attractions boosting the area’s popularity.

Employment in the borough’s visitor economy has also risen, with a 3.5 per cent increase in full time equivalents to 11,493.

The figures are calculated through Steam, (the Scarborough Tourism Economic Analysis Monitor).  It is an accredited method of calculation used by many other visitor destinations.

As part of its visitor economy strategy, Cheshire East Council has a long-standing aspiration to help create a visitor economy worth £1bn by 2020.

Cheshire East deputy leader David Brown, cabinet member with responsibility for tourism and the visitor economy, said: “This is excellent news for Cheshire East, the council and our outstanding hospitality and tourism industry.

“More people are discovering what the borough has to offer. Some visitors come for the shows – Nantwich, Royal Cheshire, the RHS Flower Show – or concerts such as Rewind and Blue Dot festivals.

“Others are here for our great historic places of interest, our breathtaking countryside, or to explore our canals and rivers.  Many choose to stay overnight in our quality hotels and B and Bs.

“Hosting the country’s most successful stage of the Tour of Britain gave an added boost and showcased the borough to the world. Then of course there is the business tourism and the large numbers of people who visit the borough purely for business reasons but who often stay for longer than planned or return with their family.”

The detailed analysis of the latest figures shows a 64.6 per cent increase in the value of the visitor economy to Cheshire East since the borough came into being in 2009. Overnight stays in 2016 injected £188m into the hotel industry – an increase of 4.5 per cent on the previous year.

With continuing investment in the borough’s heritage attractions at Tatton Park, Quarry Bank Mill and Jodrell Bank, this could lead to a further boost in numbers as the projects develop, while Cheshire East Council will stage another Tour of Britain cycle event in 2018. 

Katrina Michel, chief executive of Marketing Cheshire, said: “Cheshire East is developing a distinctive visitor economy that is in touch with what today’s visitors want – a great mix of outdoor experiences, unique events and high-quality accommodation. 

“Its location between Manchester Airport and HS2 Crewe means that it is set fair for significant growth in the future.”

The Cheshire East Visitor Economic Strategy 2016-2020 can be viewed or downloaded at: http://bit.ly/2ujYdKe

FiRELiNK eNewsletter for September 2017

Subject: FiRELiNK eNewsletter for September 2017 from Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service


This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch. This information has been sent on behalf of Cheshire Fire & Rescue Service

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Message sent by

Ashley Lawton (Cheshire Fire , Administrator, Cheshire Fire)

Welcome to the September edition of the Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service e-Newsletter.


Get your chimney ready for the winter

With the colder, winter months looming, people will begin to start using open fires and their chimneys again.  In order to keep you and your family safe from fire, you need to take necessary steps such as ensuring your chimney is swept regularly, depending upon what fuel you burn and we would urge all householders to have a working smoke alarm in their home.

For more information - Get your chimney ready for the winter


Young people wanted for Prince's Trust Programmes

Prince's Trust

We're recruiting for Prince's Trust team members in Ellesmere Port, Halton, Chester, Crewe and Macclesfield.

Aged 16 to 25? Unemployed? Want to gain new skills and develop existing ones to help you get back into employment or education?

For more information - Young people wanted for Prince's Trust Programmes


Fire Station open days

Ellesmere Port Fire Station Open Day 2017

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service fire stations will be holding a number of free fire station open days in September.

Find out more - Fire Station open days

Find out about your local fire station - where it is, what open days or special events they are holding and how to get in contact with them.

Find out more - Your local fire station


Biker Down courses

Biker down

If you were the first on the scene of an accident involving a biker, would you know what to do? Would you know who is most at risk, how to protect the area or whether you should remove the helmet of a downed rider?

Actions taken in the first few moments after an accident can be crucial in minimising injuries and can make a real difference to the lives of those involved, but there can be some uncertainty about what to do in these situations.

We are holding a number of free Biker Down training courses this year. For dates and details please visit our website.

Find out more - Biker Down