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Thursday, 28 February 2013

LET THEIR BE LIGHT !!

                    

Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor Brian Silvester has taken up a complaint about the site of the former elderly persons home at Linden Court off Gresty Terrace in Crewe. The home has been demolished but there is a public right of way through the site that was unlit and dangerous. He said," I immediatley took it up with the land owners Wulvern Housing and I am pleased to say that lighting has been  installed and the path is now safe. I would like to thank Wulvern Housing for taking such swift action."


Cllr Brian Silvester BA (Hons)
Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor

Tel/fax 01270 567757

101 is the police non-emergency number

 

Cheshire Police are reminding the public of the national non-emergency telephone number − ‘101′. Effective for over a year now, the introduction of ‘101′ has been part of a national programme to make it easier for members of the public to contact police in a non-emergency, where an immediate police response is not required.

When should the public call 101?

You should call 101 to report less urgent crime or disorder, to contact the police with general enquiries or if you just want to speak to a local officer. This can include −

- If your car has been stolen

- If your property has been damaged

- If you are reporting a minor traffic incident

- If you suspect drug use or dealing

- Giving police information about crime in your area

Assistant Chief Constable, Janette McCormick said:

"People in Cheshire have told us that the memorable number 101 makes it much easier to contact us. You have also told us you use the 101 number rather than using 999 when there is not a need for an emergency response. We have certainly seen this in the calls we are answering in the control centre.

With your support, we can better make decisions and ensure we get officers to the most urgent incidents first. We responded to over 23,000 incidents in January and of those needing an emergency response we were there in less than 11 minutes. The simple number has also encouraged people to call us to report incidents and information and that ensures we keep people safe."

Calls to 101 will not change the way in which Cheshire Police respond to non-emergency calls, they will continue to be managed by officers and staff who work in the call handling centre.

There is a single flat rate charge of 15 pence, no matter how long the duration of the call is, what time of day it is or whether the call is from a landline or mobile phone.

However, the public are reminded to always call 999 in an emergency, where there is a threat to life or a crime in progress.

Wednesday, 27 February 2013

Victim supports our ‘speak out, don’t be silent’ campaign

 

Cheshire Police have relaunched ‘speak out, don’t be silent’ to coincide with a national abuse campaign, which has been issued by the Home Office. Whilst it is customary that cases of domestic abuse happen throughout the year, there is a constant need to drive home the message that no one should have to put up with any form of abuse or behaviour which seeks to demean or intimidate a victim in a verbal, emotional or sexual way.

A victim of domestic abuse has agreed to support our campaign because she feels that her experiences will hopefully encourage other victims to come forward. She prefers to remain anonymous but is keen to drive the message to other victims by stating that "I would say once is enough, don’t go back and fool yourself that they won’t do it again. It takes a lot of courage to leave a violent relationship, but if you don’t recognise yourself anymore then it’s time to make a fresh start. Being subjected to domestic violence for a long period of time can make you lose all your self esteem as I’ve experienced. I only felt empowered once I made the decision to leave. People always comment on how confident I am now."

Her ex partner was seven years older than her, and she recalls the moment as "an instant attraction − he was tall, dark and handsome." Her first impressions of him were "that he seemed like a gentleman, was always wanting to take me out and he would compliment me all the time."

She was in the relationship for three and a half years but it was when she became pregnant that he started to hit her. "We went out for our anniversary and he’d run out of money and I didn’t have much left on me so he made us walk home which was about ten miles or more. I had to keep running to catch up with him and it was getting dark. He pushed me into the road and walked off. I almost got run over. I was worried for months afterwards that there would be something wrong with the baby − luckily there wasn’t. I didn’t tell anyone at all as I was too embarrassed.

When asking if there had been any early signs before the hitting started of him trying to control the relationship, she commented that "he used to shout a lot and if he didn’t like what I’d cooked him for tea, he would throw it on the floor and smash the plate. He had a tendency to smash things up in the house if I had bought them.

In the past, I’d had an operation with a scar on my tummy and he’d always say that if we weren’t together that anyone else would be repulsed by it, but that he didn’t mind it. My friends disliked him and if we ever went out as a group, he would put me down but he would do the same to my friends. He used to tell me to wear lots of make up (not that I did) because he was embarrassed to be seen with me, without it."

She moved into his house after four months of going out with him but started to realise that he was controlling. "I felt that I could change his ways, but he got progressively worse."

His acts of intimidation extended to "telling me that I looked fat in certain clothes that I wore. The first time I went out after I’d had our child, I went out with my friends to celebrate my 20th birthday whilst he stayed at home. It was a girl’s night out but he told me I had to be back at 1am but I wasn’t and he locked me out for the night. He used to lock me out a lot or take my house key off me. He also used to cancel my mobile phone contract without any warning.

She also comments that "I was forced to go back to work when our baby was nine months old or he had threatened to kick me out. I worked late shifts and sometimes three nights on the run but he would always expect his tea on the table before I went. I ended up getting the sack after a few months because if I was working on a Saturday night he wouldn’t stay in to look after our baby."

When the victim stays with their abusive partner, it can often seem like a vicious circle because the more that you stay in the relationship, the harder it is to leave. The victim explains that she did accept his behaviour as normal and because it had been going on for some time, "I‘d never really had a long relationship before. I was only 18 when we got together. After our baby was born, he would say that I loved the baby more than him. He started going out on nights out all the time. I couldn’t work because our baby was very small and my boyfriend would take all my money off me. But then I would have to buy all the food and I ended up getting into an overdraft of £3,500, which I had to keep extending to buy nappies, etc. By this time, I realised that I’d got stuck in a rut and every day I started to love him less and was thinking of getting out. It was very much like mind games with him."

The victim did find the courage to leave the relationship and she puts this down to a final reminder of his abuse. "I found a picture on his mobile of him and a girl kissing so I’d decided by that point that enough was enough. When I confronted him he gave me a black eye. My family and friends didn’t know he was hitting me because I used to cover the bruises up on my body with make up or wear long sleeves. They knew something was wrong, although I think they just put it down to the strains of motherhood. I’d always been curvaceous and a healthy 10-12 but went down to a size 6-8. I’d lost at least two stone and I would take weight gainers (special milkshakes) every day because I used to have moments where I would black out (when you get up too fast, etc), I was completely run down.

Following the split, the victim comments that "he changed after we split up. He was remorseful and couldn’t apologise enough for driving me away. The first three weeks afterwards we hadn’t contacted him once - I knew he was waiting for me to do it − and all contact to see his baby son was done through his mum. He rang me up at 7am one morning crying that I hadn’t got in touch and that he knew that I didn’t want him back. I actually did feel sorry for him but I’d noticed the change in myself and I liked how I had a new found confidence so there was no way I was getting back with him. To this day now, six years later, he still loves me and has tried to get back with me. But there is no way I would ever get myself into anything like that again for the sake of my son."

Her final message to all victims is "I would say really to look out for warning signs − don’t put up with it, because it changes your personality and when you are going through it, you don’t know who you are anymore. You are more confident when you have ended it, and I would say that from my own experience that it will get worse if you don’t tell anyone. I used to pretend that it wasn’t happening myself, you would think, ‘oh no, it doesn’t matter, it was a mistake’. For a lot of the time, I didn’t tell anyone he was hitting me, until he gave me a black eye and then I knew that I couldn’t pretend anymore."

You can read more about our campaigns at www.cheshire.police.uk and www.upbeat.uk.com/17plus.

Fraudsters target cash points across Cheshire

tampered machine

Cheshire Police are alerting the public to a series of cash point scams that are occurring across the county. Fraudsters are targeting cash machines positioned outside post offices, convenience stores and other outlets across Cheshire and the key message from the police is to be on your guard before you use a cash machine and be alert to suspicious activity from any cash machine points.

Operation Astoria has been put in place by the Economic Crime Unit to concentrate on crime related to ATMs (cash machines) within the Cheshire Force area. Many of the tactics being used by fraudsters to target machines are card skimming, card entrapment and cash trapping.

There are three main ways in which the fraudster will commit fraud:

  1. Card Skimming − This involves the use of the video recording element of mobile telephones to capture the pin numbers of innocent ATM users. These adapted mobile telephones are usually hidden above the pin number area. The fraudster will also attach a false mouth piece which will read and copy the details on the magnetic strip of the card. Once these details have been copied, this information can be transferred on to a new card and, with the pin number, they can withdraw money from the victims account.
  2. Card Entrapment − The fraudster will use an adapted mobile telephone to record the pin number being inputted by the victim but will use a device to trap the victims card once it has been placed into the machine. The victim usually believes that the card has been retained by the cash machine due to a problem. The fraudster will recover the original card and the pin number and is then ready to use the card.
  3. Cash Trapping − The fraudster will place a device over the area where the money is released from the cash machine. The device traps the money making the victim believe that the machine has a problem and is not releasing any funds. The fraudster will then collect the device and the money collected.

In the North West, UK card fraud has dropped considerably over the last five years but still accounts for £21m making this region the second worst in the UK.

DC Tony Condon, from the Economic Crime Unit stated that "There have been an increasing number of attacks on ATMs across Cheshire, where the fraudsters are using all three methods to obtain money from innocent victims.  ATM users do not know they are victims until they realise their account balance has reduced more than normal.

Our intelligence suggests that organised crime groups are responsible for the attacks and are of Eastern European origin which has in turn led to more overseas spend on fraudulent use of UK cards and stolen identity. We are asking all members of the public to be vigilant when using a cash machine and to be aware of any suspicious activity around cash points, which may be an attempt to deploy a device."

If anyone wants to report any suspicious activity, please contact Cheshire Police on 101 or visit our fraud page at cheshire.police.uk.

Police advise residents after distraction burglary in Nantwich

 

Police are reminding vulnerable residents not to answer the door to unexpected callers following a distraction burglary at an address in Nantwich.

At approximately 3.20pm on Friday 22 February 2013 two men attended an address in the South Crofts area claiming to be from the waterboard and took cash after tricking their way into the pensioner′s home.

The woman, who is in her 80s, was not injured but was left shaken by the incident.

The two men are described as wearing dark clothing. One of the men had close cropped hair.

DS Andy McGillan said: "I cannot stress enough the importance of people not letting anyone into their home who calls unexpectedly and if you have a chain, always use it.

"It′s also vitally important that people realise that the waterboard does not exist.

"If you do answer the door, make sure you have the door on the chain and ask for identification.

"If they provide it, close the door and check their identity is bona fide by calling the phone number they have provided.

"But most importantly, if you have any doubts about them being genuine, don′t let them in and ask them to come back later when you are not alone."

Anyone with information should contact Crewe CID on 101 quoting incident number 524 of 22 February 2013.

Alternatively information can be given anonymously by contacting Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

Tuesday, 26 February 2013

Mid Staffordshire Hospital

Why has the Oscar Pistorius case been leading the BBC news for the last several days? He is a foreign athlete who has allegedly shot dead his girl friend. I can understand the initial incident being reported  but to give wall to wall coverage of the bail hearing is quite ridiculous. I am sure that many people will think it is the trial when in fact it is just a bail hearing. How can a bail hearing lead the news for so many days?

The BBC need to get  a proper sense of priorities. At the Mid Staffordshire Hospital up to 1200 patients died due to the neglect of the NHS but nobody has been brought to account and the BBC are not pursuing it at all. There have been repeated calls for Sir David Nicholson, the head of the NHS who presided over the Mid Staffordshire Hospital disaster, to resign, but the BBC do not report that. At the Winterbourne House in Bristol six out of 11 care workers who admitted a total of 38 charges of neglect or abusing patients were rightly jailed. At the Mid Staffs Hospital 1200 actually died ( nobody died from the neglect at Winterbourne) but none of the Mid Staffs Hospital staff have been even been charged, let alone jailed. I can only assume that this is the public sector looking after its own. If Mid Staffs Hospital was a private hospital the BBC would be all over the case demanding prosecutions.

Yours faithfully,

Cllr Brian Silvester BA (Hons)
Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor

Tel/fax 01270 567757

LOCAL AREA PARTNERSHIP BOUNDARIES CHALLENGED.

 

Willaston Borough Councillor Brian Silvester is supporting a plea by Willaston Parish Council to be part of the Nantwich Local Area Partnership (LAP) instead of the Crewe LAP.

He said," Willaston is currently part of the Crewe LAP. However, the village is closer to Nantwich than Crewe and feels more connected to Nantwich. Indeed it has a Nantwich post code and is policed by the Nantwich Police Unit.  The Parish Council would like to see Willaston included within the Nantwich LAP rather than the Crewe LAP, including the Colleys Lane area to the north of the village, which for some reason tends to get linked in with Crewe by some service providers.  A recent report by the Interim Chief Executive Kim Ryley  to the Cabinet/Council reported on becoming a Strategic Council, which included reference to the need to review how the Borough Council works in local areas, including enhancing or replacing LAPs. Consideration of the footprint of area working will be part of this review and I welcome that." 

Councillor Margaret Simon who represents WISTASTON Ward says;

“Willaston Parish falls into two Cheshire East Wards, the Crewe Road and Colleys Lane areas are represented by Councillor Jacquie Weatherill and myself as part of Wistaston Ward.  Our whole Ward, is policed by Crewe Neighbourhood Policing Unit and we discuss our Highways issues and concerns at the Crewe LAP.  It is confusing and, whilst Cllr Weatherill and I represent our Willaston residents at the Crewe meetings, I can understand why the Parish Council would like to have their Parish covered by the LAP that they feel that they have the most affinity with.”

Cheshire East campaign to drive down energy bills

 

Residents are being urged to beat the energy price rises by joining the Collective Energy Switching campaign which launches today, giving people a better deal on their household energy bills.

With energy bills continually on the rise – and more people suffering fuel poverty – the Collective Energy Switching campaign aims to help tackle the problem.

Households are being urged to sign up - for free - before April 8, and the more people who do, the better deal they will receive. Cheshire East is hoping to smash its target of getting 7,000 households to sign up.

So how does it work? Cheshire East Council will hold an on-line auction on April 9, and the energy companies who make the lowest bid will win your custom. People are not obliged to commit at this stage.

Councillor Jamie Macrae, Cabinet member in charge of prosperity and economic regeneration, said: “This campaign is open to everyone and the more people we get to sign up, the bigger buying power we will have to drive down energy bills.

“Cheshire East Council is committed to helping people who are finding it increasingly hard to heat their homes during the harsh winters.

“Collective Energy Switching is an innovative scheme designed to place power in the hands of the consumer rather than power companies.

“It works by encouraging people to sign up to their local Collective Energy Switching scheme so that power companies can bid for their business during an on-line auction.

“The provider offering the best value will win the business and the more people who sign up to the scheme, the better buying power and lower prices we can get.

“Some people are afraid to switch and don’t know what is involved, but believe me this is very simple - and it’s free - and there’s support for those who are unsure. There’s no obligation to switch until you are completely confident.

“Everyone is feeling the effects of rising energy bills on their household budgets, so it makes sense.”

To sign up log on to: www.energytogether.co.uk and fill out a short on-line application or call 0300 123 5035. As well as registering yourself you can register up to four other households.

The Fire Service and the Council’s Care and Repair Service will also be carrying out home visits armed with leaflets detailing how to sign up and get involved. There will also be a series of sign-up events at Cheshire East’s libraries.

There will be billboards in towns and leaflets distributed to support the campaign as well as details about how to join in the Council Tax Booklet delivered to Cheshire East residents. 

Sunday, 24 February 2013

Fraudsters target cash points across Cheshire

tampered machine

Cheshire Police are alerting the public to a series of cash point scams that are occurring across the county. Fraudsters are targeting cash machines positioned outside post offices, convenience stores and other outlets across Cheshire and the key message from the police is to be on your guard before you use a cash machine and be alert to suspicious activity from any cash machine points.

Operation Astoria has been put in place by the Economic Crime Unit to concentrate on crime related to ATMs (cash machines) within the Cheshire Force area. Many of the tactics being used by fraudsters to target machines are card skimming, card entrapment and cash trapping.

There are three main ways in which the fraudster will commit fraud:

  1. Card Skimming − This involves the use of the video recording element of mobile telephones to capture the pin numbers of innocent ATM users. These adapted mobile telephones are usually hidden above the pin number area. The fraudster will also attach a false mouth piece which will read and copy the details on the magnetic strip of the card. Once these details have been copied, this information can be transferred on to a new card and, with the pin number, they can withdraw money from the victims account.
  2. Card Entrapment − The fraudster will use an adapted mobile telephone to record the pin number being inputted by the victim but will use a device to trap the victims card once it has been placed into the machine. The victim usually believes that the card has been retained by the cash machine due to a problem. The fraudster will recover the original card and the pin number and is then ready to use the card.
  3. Cash Trapping − The fraudster will place a device over the area where the money is released from the cash machine. The device traps the money making the victim believe that the machine has a problem and is not releasing any funds. The fraudster will then collect the device and the money collected.

In the North West, UK card fraud has dropped considerably over the last five years but still accounts for £21m making this region the second worst in the UK.

DC Tony Condon, from the Economic Crime Unit stated that "There have been an increasing number of attacks on ATMs across Cheshire, where the fraudsters are using all three methods to obtain money from innocent victims.  ATM users do not know they are victims until they realise their account balance has reduced more than normal.

Our intelligence suggests that organised crime groups are responsible for the attacks and are of Eastern European origin which has in turn led to more overseas spend on fraudulent use of UK cards and stolen identity. We are asking all members of the public to be vigilant when using a cash machine and to be aware of any suspicious activity around cash points, which may be an attempt to deploy a device."

If anyone wants to report any suspicious activity, please contact Cheshire Police on 101 or visit our fraud page at cheshire.police.uk.

Friday, 22 February 2013

BLUE BELL BMW TUNES UP FOR NANTWICH’S ‘KEEP MUSIC LIVE’ FESTIVAL WITH STAGE SPONSORSHIP DEAL

 

Blue Bell Crewe will be helping to put South Cheshire’s finest musical talent in the spotlight this Easter Weekend after announcing a stage sponsorship deal with the Nantwich-based Railway Hotel’s ‘Keep Music Live’ festival, 28 March - 1 April .

The Railway’s annual Easter Weekend of top live music will feature an array of the local circuit’s finest acts at the popular Pillory Street venue, and is completely free admission.

The Weston Road-based BMW dealership has been officially named as the festival’s sponsor of the indoor stage, set to play host to a packed line-up of diverse and entertaining artists.

Phil Brown, Blue Bell Crewe Sales Director said: “Blue Bell Crewe is delighted to support Nantwich’s ‘Keep Music Live’ festival which promises to be an amazing showcase for the best of South Cheshire’s original music.

“The indoor stage has played host to an array of amazing acts and the Railway is a wonderful setting for great music.

“Blue Bell is dedicated to supporting local talent as proven by our ongoing sponsorship of the area’s upcoming sporting stars and we’re delighted to back the future stars of the area’s ever-growing music scene.”

The five-day festival will feature well-known local acts such as Stephen Robinson & Friends on the Thursday (28 March), Nuclear Safari on the Friday (29 March), and The Prospects on the Saturday (30 March).

Easter Sunday’s (31 March) packed bill features Jalapenos, and Mad Dog while Beardsmith, AWOL and Indecision are amongst Monday’s (1 April) stand-out acts.

Railway Hotel landlord Nigel Humphries commented: “We’re thrilled to have Blue Bell BMW on board with the festival and delighted that they share our passion for promoting the very best of local talent.

“This is the second year we have hosted the festival and once again, I’m sure it’s going to be an amazing and free weekend celebrating how vital live music is to the community.”

For more information about Blue Bell BMW Crewe visit the dealership on Fourth Avenue, Weston Road, Crewe, Cheshire, CW1 6XH, or call 01270 212525.

For more information about Railway Hotel’s ‘Keep Music Live’ festival visit www.railway-hotel.org or call 01270 623482.

Games Maker Legacy Group

 

Cheshire East’s Olympic and Paralympic volunteers are being invited to a meeting to explore ways in which they can get involved with local sports initiatives – using their experience to help create a sporting legacy for local people.

The aim of the Cheshire East Games Maker Legacy Group is to discuss the current opportunities to get involved in sport in Cheshire East , leading up to the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow in 2014.

A number of the volunteers recently attended the Cheshire East Sports Awards and expressed an interest to the Council in getting involved in sport locally.

The call is now going out to Games Makers that didn’t attend the recent event.

Organisers also want to draw on volunteers’ experiences around how the Borough’s sporting scene can be improved.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cabinet member in charge of health and adult social care, said: “We are hoping that we can form a strong group of people with similar experiences that can support sport and physical activity in Cheshire East in the future.

“We understand that a lot of the Games Makers already have commitments, but any time they could spare to share their experience and enthusiasm would be greatly appreciated.”

The event at Congleton Town Hall is on Thursday, February 28, and runs between 7pm and 8.30pm.

To book your place, please contact Leisure and Play Development Officer Chris Greenhalgh by email : chris.greenhalgh@cheshireeast.gov.uk, or  by phone on 01625 383778.

COUNCIL ASKED TO SUPPORT THE ALEX IN CUP FINAL.

 

Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor Brian Silvester is putting forward the following question at the Council Meeting on the 28/2/13.

Crewe Alexandra Football Club

"Would the Mayor please agree to pass on the good wishes of Cheshire East Council to Crewe Alexandra Football Club in the Johnstone Paints Final on April 7th, and encourage Council to support the team’s bid to come back with the Cup?  

For a small club like Crewe Alexandra to win through to play at Wembley twice in less than a year is a major achievement.

The winning philosophy of the team and their appearances in the national sporting media helps to put Cheshire East on the map and will encourage many more people to support the Alex and visit the Borough. It will also lead to more local people playing football and becoming involved in healthy activity.

Everyone involved with Crewe Alexandra should be congratulated on their continuing success."

Cllr Brian Silvester BA (Hons)
Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor

Tel/fax 01270 567757

Wednesday, 20 February 2013

Local Plan consultation is coming to an end - get involved today

 

Time is nearly up for you to get involved in the latest round of the Local Plan consultation.

The Local Plan Development Strategy and Policy Principles consultation closes on Tuesday, February 26.

Due to local government reorganisation and the introduction of Cheshire East Council as a local authority in 2009, completion of the Local Plan is currently delayed, leaving Cheshire East under siege from developers submitting plans for development.

The Local Plan will be finalised in August of this year, which will help to protect Cheshire East from unplanned, unsustainable development throughout the Borough.

Councillor David Brown, Cabinet member in charge of strategic communities, said:  “The Local Plan will provide a blueprint for the future of Cheshire East for the next 20 years. Having our Local Plan in place, means that we can make informed decisions when developers come our way.

“We are fighting hard to protect Cheshire East from unwanted development. So far, we have received 1,176 comments on the Development Strategy – if you feel strongly about the future of your town, please give us your comments too.”

The draft Development Strategy document can be viewed at: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/localplan where you can have your say and fill out a comments form.

The Development Strategy document is also available to view at any of our libraries, or by visiting the Council’s Delamere House in Crewe; Macclesfield Town Hall; and the Council’s headquarters at Westfields in Sandbach.  The Local Plan consultation ends on February 26, 2013.

Background:

The latest Local Plan consultation is called the Draft Development Strategy and can be viewed by visiting: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/localplan. There is also a chance to have your say and fill out a comment form.

The new Local Plan aims to promote economic growth, improve connectivity and protect the Cheshire East countryside from unsustained, unplanned development for the next 20 years.

Consultations on the Local Plan began two years ago and since then, the feedback on the Issues and Options paper and the individual Town Strategies has been considered to produce a Draft Development Strategy.

The finalised Development Strategy will deliver 27,000 new houses and 20,000 new jobs over the next two decades and the infrastructure needed for this to happen.

For further information please contact:

Jemma Williams

Communications Officer (Campaigns)

Cheshire East Council

Direct: 01270 686580

Mobile: 07879117189

Email: jemma.williams@cheshireast.gov.uk

See the International Space Station

The International Space Station passes over the UK twice tomorrow (Wed 20) at 18:04 (incredibly bright) and 19:41 (very bright) if you missed it tonight: http://www.meteorwatch.org/iss-uk-passes-february-2013/

Victim supports our ‘speak out, don’t be silent’ campaign

 

Cheshire Police have relaunched ‘speak out, don’t be silent’ to coincide with a national abuse campaign, which has been issued by the Home Office. Whilst it is customary that cases of domestic abuse happen throughout the year, there is a constant need to drive home the message that no one should have to put up with any form of abuse or behaviour which seeks to demean or intimidate a victim in a verbal, emotional or sexual way.

A victim of domestic abuse has agreed to support our campaign because she feels that her experiences will hopefully encourage other victims to come forward. She prefers to remain anonymous but is keen to drive the message to other victims by stating that "I would say once is enough, don’t go back and fool yourself that they won’t do it again. It takes a lot of courage to leave a violent relationship, but if you don’t recognise yourself anymore then it’s time to make a fresh start. Being subjected to domestic violence for a long period of time can make you lose all your self esteem as I’ve experienced. I only felt empowered once I made the decision to leave. People always comment on how confident I am now."

Her ex partner was seven years older than her, and she recalls the moment as "an instant attraction − he was tall, dark and handsome." Her first impressions of him were "that he seemed like a gentleman, was always wanting to take me out and he would compliment me all the time."

She was in the relationship for three and a half years but it was when she became pregnant that he started to hit her. "We went out for our anniversary and he’d run out of money and I didn’t have much left on me so he made us walk home which was about ten miles or more. I had to keep running to catch up with him and it was getting dark. He pushed me into the road and walked off. I almost got run over. I was worried for months afterwards that there would be something wrong with the baby − luckily there wasn’t. I didn’t tell anyone at all as I was too embarrassed.

When asking if there had been any early signs before the hitting started of him trying to control the relationship, she commented that "he used to shout a lot and if he didn’t like what I’d cooked him for tea, he would throw it on the floor and smash the plate. He had a tendency to smash things up in the house if I had bought them.

In the past, I’d had an operation with a scar on my tummy and he’d always say that if we weren’t together that anyone else would be repulsed by it, but that he didn’t mind it. My friends disliked him and if we ever went out as a group, he would put me down but he would do the same to my friends. He used to tell me to wear lots of make up (not that I did) because he was embarrassed to be seen with me, without it."

She moved into his house after four months of going out with him but started to realise that he was controlling. "I felt that I could change his ways, but he got progressively worse."

His acts of intimidation extended to "telling me that I looked fat in certain clothes that I wore. The first time I went out after I’d had our child, I went out with my friends to celebrate my 20th birthday whilst he stayed at home. It was a girl’s night out but he told me I had to be back at 1am but I wasn’t and he locked me out for the night. He used to lock me out a lot or take my house key off me. He also used to cancel my mobile phone contract without any warning.

She also comments that "I was forced to go back to work when our baby was nine months old or he had threatened to kick me out. I worked late shifts and sometimes three nights on the run but he would always expect his tea on the table before I went. I ended up getting the sack after a few months because if I was working on a Saturday night he wouldn’t stay in to look after our baby."

When the victim stays with their abusive partner, it can often seem like a vicious circle because the more that you stay in the relationship, the harder it is to leave. The victim explains that she did accept his behaviour as normal and because it had been going on for some time, "I‘d never really had a long relationship before. I was only 18 when we got together. After our baby was born, he would say that I loved the baby more than him. He started going out on nights out all the time. I couldn’t work because our baby was very small and my boyfriend would take all my money off me. But then I would have to buy all the food and I ended up getting into an overdraft of £3,500, which I had to keep extending to buy nappies, etc. By this time, I realised that I’d got stuck in a rut and every day I started to love him less and was thinking of getting out. It was very much like mind games with him."

The victim did find the courage to leave the relationship and she puts this down to a final reminder of his abuse. "I found a picture on his mobile of him and a girl kissing so I’d decided by that point that enough was enough. When I confronted him he gave me a black eye. My family and friends didn’t know he was hitting me because I used to cover the bruises up on my body with make up or wear long sleeves. They knew something was wrong, although I think they just put it down to the strains of motherhood. I’d always been curvaceous and a healthy 10-12 but went down to a size 6-8. I’d lost at least two stone and I would take weight gainers (special milkshakes) every day because I used to have moments where I would black out (when you get up too fast, etc), I was completely run down.

Following the split, the victim comments that "he changed after we split up. He was remorseful and couldn’t apologise enough for driving me away. The first three weeks afterwards we hadn’t contacted him once - I knew he was waiting for me to do it − and all contact to see his baby son was done through his mum. He rang me up at 7am one morning crying that I hadn’t got in touch and that he knew that I didn’t want him back. I actually did feel sorry for him but I’d noticed the change in myself and I liked how I had a new found confidence so there was no way I was getting back with him. To this day now, six years later, he still loves me and has tried to get back with me. But there is no way I would ever get myself into anything like that again for the sake of my son."

Her final message to all victims is "I would say really to look out for warning signs − don’t put up with it, because it changes your personality and when you are going through it, you don’t know who you are anymore. You are more confident when you have ended it, and I would say that from my own experience that it will get worse if you don’t tell anyone. I used to pretend that it wasn’t happening myself, you would think, ‘oh no, it doesn’t matter, it was a mistake’. For a lot of the time, I didn’t tell anyone he was hitting me, until he gave me a black eye and then I knew that I couldn’t pretend anymore."

You can read more about our campaigns at www.cheshire.police.uk and www.upbeat.uk.com/17plus.

Recycling Champion of the Year

 

Recycling Champion of the Year Claire Haworth collected her prize for being the best recycler in Cheshire East.

The prize, presented by Councillor David Topping Cabinet member in charge of the environment, is a 12-month family leisure pass to any of Cheshire East’s leisure centres.

Claire, 46, of Wilmslow, is a mum-of-two and does all she can to teach her family how to save the environment, impressing judges with her commitment and passion.

She said: “I am absolutely delighted to win a leisure pass for my family and I just hope that I can pass on positive ways to save the environment through this campaign.”

Claire’s winning submission advised of the benefits of chucking ground coffee granules on to house-hold plants to perk them up, among other tips.

Councillor Topping said: “I’d just like to say well done to Claire who is doing a great deal of justice to the environment by encouraging her family to tackle the issue in the home – and now through this campaign.

“If we were all as committed as Claire, the environment would be a great place for future generations.”

The best and brightest ideas about how to reduce, reuse and recycle were summed up in 150 words from each entrant with a final winner chosen and six runners-up winning a family day out to the Beatrix Potter event at Tatton Hall, opening this spring.

The best ideas will now be passed on to the public to inspire others to try different ways to recycle and cut down on all the unnecessary waste.

For more information about recycling log on to: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/recycling

Claire’s winning submission:

“It starts with how you live life in the first place! My recycling is kept to a minimum in the first place as I buy milk in glass bottles from the milkman and use a garden composter for fruit and vegetables.

“Coffee grounds go on plants and stale bread, cake, biscuits, fruit, butter, potatoes and cheese goes out to the birds, hedgehogs and foxes (photographic and video evidence available!).

“Leftover scraps and old meat are fed to my cats and leftover food is made into something the next day or given to my mum.

“I have a vegetable patch, drink tap water, buy meat from the butchers and buy vegetables loose (less packaging) whilst also supporting local businesses.

“Basically, I’ve made a few very simple lifestyle changes and everyone wins - especially the environment!

“I’m a 70s child, so what do you expect! We can change our lifestyle but I can’t change my ageing metabolism - need the help of a gym for that!”

Tuesday, 19 February 2013

Demolition has started adjacent to Crewe railway station of the Council-owned former Royal Mail sorting office off Weston Road

Reporter J White

photo 2

The demolition is part of the 'Crewe Rail Exchange' project, which on completion will include a new car park, taxi rank and subway access to the station.

The Cheshire East Council website states the project will, "significantly enhance the role of Crewe Station as a major transport interchange on the national rail network and as a key infrastructure priority for the Council. The redevelopment of this site ensures a critical first phase of the regeneration of Crewe Station. The project represents a significant opportunity to enhance the station for users and train operations and also add to the viability for business and employment growth, a key ambition in the Council’s “All Change for Crewe” programme."

http://www.cheshireeasthighways.org/Major-Projects/Crewe-Rail-Exchange.aspx

FIVE YEAR HOUSING PLAN SIGNALS FUTURE VICTORY OVER SPECULATIVE DEVELOPERS

 

Cheshire East Council has taken a major step forward after rubber-stamping its official five-year housing land supply.

It means Cheshire East’s countryside should now be protected for the next five years against unsustainable speculative developers who are driven to build new houses purely for profit.

Deputy Leader Councillor David Brown said it signalled a clear victory for the Council in its fight to fend off unwelcome, unsustainable and unplanned development in the Borough.

The all-important document has been brought forward by the Council and should fend off speculative housing development applications until the Council’s Local Plan document is ratified by the Government later this year. The Local Plan will then provide a blueprint for necessary sustainable growth in terms of housing and infrastructure.

Councillor David Brown, Deputy Leader of Cheshire East Council, said: “What an achievement for the Council. I would like to thank all the hard-working officers in our planning team who have worked incredibly hard to achieve this over the last few months. We are now in a fantastic position to tackle the issue of unplanned, unwanted and unsustainable development.

“The five year housing supply should allow our towns to grow in a planned and sustainable way and will allow us to continue to finalise the Local Plan document.”

The housing sites identified in the SHLAA (Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment) were approved by the Cheshire East Council’s Strategic Planning Board. The SHLAA is required as a key piece of evidence to support the Council’s housing policies.

The SHLAA fits in with the Council’s brownfield first policy, identifying brownfield sites wherever possible. The Council will now need to review this document annually to ensure that the list of potential sites is kept updated and the Local Plan is ‘sound’ according to the new National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). The review will begin in April with a call for sites at this time.

Councillor Brown added: “This latest SHLAA update highlights the significant work that Cheshire East Council has undertaken in identifying a five year housing supply in the Borough; the Town Strategies, the Development Strategy and the Policy Principles documents all being consulted upon within the last year. 

“This now enables us to begin addressing the Housing Growth Policy, based around existing towns, to meet local demand and ensure we meet our five year housing supply target of 6,510 homes over the next five years.”

Police appeal following stolen canister on behalf of Lancashire Police

 

Police appeal after canister stolen from a van in Bacup

Police are appealing to the public for help after a canister containing a small amount of radioactive material was stolen from a van in Bacup sometime over the weekend.

Officers were alerted to the incident in the early hours of this morning after the van driver discovered the material was missing. The Peugeot Panel Van was parked up at an address on New Line in Bacup.

The stolen canister is in a yellow case which measures one foot long and will be fairly heavy. Police have released a photograph of what it looks like.

Chief Inspector Russ Procter from Burnley Police said, "It is important that this material is located as soon as possible. I would ask the public, especially in the Rossendale area, to keep an eye out for this canister and if they locate it then to call the police who will come and deal with it.

"I would also appeal direct to the people who have stolen this. They may have no idea what it is that they have in their possession or they may have discarded it somewhere. If that is the case then I would ask them to contact us or call Crimestoppers anonymously."

Anyone with information is asked to call Lancashire police on 999 or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

The Health Protection Agency is urging anyone coming in contact with the cylinder to leave it where it is and alert the police.

A spokesperson for the HPA said: "The radioactive material, believed to be Iridium 192, will not pose a risk to the public if it remains contained in its heavy lead container marked with the radiation trefoil. However, if the material is outside of its protection packaging, anyone who has come into prolonged physical contact, such as keeping it in a pocket, should seek medical assistance. If you see this package you should immediately inform the Police, do not touch it and keep away."

Action Fraud launches in Cheshire

 

Police forces across the North West region are joining a national scheme aimed at helping to tackle the growing problem of fraud. Cheshire Police will be amongst the forces going live with the launch on 18 February whereby this move to new ways of reporting will change the way that fraudulent crimes will be collated and used to detect crimes as well as build up intelligence about fraud and fraudsters in the locality.

Action Fraud has been operational since 2009, and has been designed to handle many thousands of reports of fraud and internet crime a month. There have been over one million unique visitors to the Action Fraud website since it was launched nationally.

Cheshire, Merseyside and Lancashire Police have all signed up to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud reporting centre. From Monday 18 February, victims of fraud should contact Action Fraud via the national number or website. Anyone reporting fraud to Cheshire Police will be referred to Action Fraud unless the victim is perceived to be vulnerable or an immediate police response will result in the offender being caught.  By April 2013, all police forces in England and Wales will be directing the public to this service.

When reporting a crime to Action Fraud, a national crime reference number is generated and the case is referred onto the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau for analysis before it is dispatched out to the relevant force where the criminal activity is taking place. This new system of reporting will allow for centralised intelligence and help identify and disrupt networks of criminal gang activity so that seemingly unrelated incidents from around the country can be linked through analysis. This will identify networks of criminals and will help prevent other people from becoming victims themselves.

Cheshire Police will continue to take reports of serious fraud and deal with cases where a crime is in action or where the victim is particularly vulnerable.

Detective Superintendent Geraint Jones said: "The purpose of Action Fraud is two fold: firstly to make it easier for the public to report fraud and secondly, to develop intelligence, look at trends and enable a better investigation to come out of the process. The result will be a speedier, more intelligent and more efficient process.

"Fraud is a serious crime. It impacts on all kinds of communities, in particular, vulnerable people. This type of criminality needs to be clamped down upon and the offenders need to be brought to justice."

It is estimated that fraud costs the British economy £73 billion every year. This includes anything from simple online scams to organised gangs targeting vulnerable people.  In some cases, the offenders are located outside of the country.

To report fraud, Action Fraud can be contacted directly by phone on 0300 123 2040 or online through www.actionfraud.police.uk. For more information about different types of fraud and how you can prevent yourself becoming a victim, please visit www.cheshire.police.uk.

Monday, 18 February 2013

Big Hole in road

Jonathan White, Wistaston

photo 4

The largest pothole - perhaps it should be called a gaping hole - has appeared on a busy road in Wistaston. It's located approximately half-way along Broughton Lane in the direction of Church Lane/Joey the Swan. It's so big I took a tape measure to it and it is 140cm long, 85cm wide and 5cm deep. My brother accidentally drove through it recently in his Mini and the impact cut out his engine! I'm concerned that if the road damage isn't immediately repaired there will be further damage to motor vehicles. Plus, accidents may occur when road-users swerve into oncoming traffic to avoid the hole and motorcyclists and cyclists could also be dismounted by it. Traffic have flicked rubble from the hole onto the adjacent pavement producing a buildup of debris. I've reported the pothole at http://www.cheshireeasthighways.org/Welcome.aspx

Saturday, 16 February 2013

Council Leader urges ‘shop local, buy local’ to be sure of quality meat

 

Cheshire East Council Leader Michael Jones is encouraging people to ‘buy local and eat local’ to ensure they get only the highest-quality meat.

He urged shoppers to support their local butchers and farmers to ensure they are getting top-notch beef, pork, lamb, poultry and other meat products.

It comes amid growing concern about the scandal of horse meat illegally finding its way into some cheaper processed foods.

Councillor Michael Jones, Leader of Cheshire East Council, said: “Cheshire East farmers, local butchers and farm shops need and deserve our full support.

“I buy lots of local meat. I have an excellent local butcher, who makes fantastic sausages – but there are lots of other great local shops and suppliers across the Borough.

“Farmers in Cheshire East need to be supported by our eating and buying from local butchers who butcher meat on site and process it on site from locally-sourced, trusted suppliers.

“Cheshire is famous for the quality of its meats and farm produce – and people are justifiably proud of its high reputation. We need to show our support by voting with our wallets and purses.”

Award-winning butcher Lee Parrott runs a traditional butchers on Middlewich Road, in Sandbach. As his regular customers know, he sources only the finest locally-produced beef, lamb and pork and is keen to promote the benefits of shopping locally. 

Lee said: “We are well known for our award-winning produce, all freshly-made on our own premises. Customers can be sure that all our produce is sourced from Staffordshire and Cheshire farms with full traceability.

“I very much welcome the warm words of support from Cheshire East Council Leader Councillor Jones and his team.”

It is also good to know that Cheshire East Council-supplied schools all receive their fresh meat from local butchers, based within Cheshire East, who are supplied by local farms.

These butchers do not buy in processed meat and only use fully passported/documented carcasses from local suppliers and make their own sausages and burgers, etc.

Cheshire East carried out a rigorous procurement exercise for the fresh meat supplied to its catering-serviced schools. The fresh meat was procured to assist Cheshire East gaining its Food For Life accreditation from the Soil Association.

All Cheshire East Catering schools have been awarded the Bronze Food For Life accreditation, with one recently gaining a silver award for the joint work carried out with the school and catering service.

Commissioner seeks public’s views on Youth Ambassador

 

John Dwyer, the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire is looking to appoint a Youth Ambassador to act as a conduit between young people and the police.

He has been holding various meetings with partner agencies to scope out the role of the Youth Ambassador, but now he wants the people of Cheshire, especially the younger people to have an input too.

John said, "my role as Commissioner is to be the bridge between the public and the police, and it′s important that our young people are not left out of that partnership. I want to appoint a Youth Ambassador who can work with young people to ensure that they have a voice and can help me to shape the delivery of policing.

The Youth Ambassador will also deliver key messages to the young people of Cheshire, on a variety of topics, including internet safety and drugs."

On the 15 February, a survey was launched on the Police and Crime Commissioner′s website (http://www.cheshire-pcc.gov.uk/) asking people for their views on what the Youth Ambassadors role should include.

John added, "I want the public to tell me what they want a Youth Ambassador to do. I′ll take on board what they have to say, and take their ideas to the next meeting that I have with partners to help us to scope the role which should be advertised in the next month or so. I have given up some of my own budget to pay for this vitally important full time post and I think that this is pretty rare that we ask people what a new job holder should do before we develop the job description. I am hoping to appoint the successful applicant by this summer and I will involve young people in that process too."

Join the HS2 conversation with Cheshire East

 

Cheshire East Council is urging people to join its conversation on the high-speed rail link HS2.

The authority understands that people want to know what this means for them and for their communities and wants them to help shape its future discussions with HS2 Ltd and the Department for Transport (DfT).

Since the Government’s preferred route was announced, Cheshire East has been analysing what it could mean for the area and has published a variety of detail at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/hs2 including a detailed breakdown of where the line is proposed to run.

The Council believes it will bring real benefits to Cheshire East, including a high-speed service taking passengers from Crewe to London in 58 minutes with two services each hour and a maintenance depot at Basford sidings at Crewe, creating between 200 and 300 jobs.

But right now, the Council wants to hear what the people think. What are the main benefits and drawbacks to them, their families and businesses?

This will help Cheshire East to represent their views as strongly as possible when the official consultation period on the route is announced by the Government later this year.

Councillor Michael Jones, Leader of Cheshire East Council, said: “Whilst we are delighted the plans will bring a huge economic boost to Cheshire East and the surrounding area, bringing in jobs, investment and stimulating growth, we also understand that some areas will have some serious questions about how it affects them.

“As a Council, our job is to listen to the people and make a case to the Government about how we want them to move forward with the HS2 proposals.

“To do this, we want to hear from everybody, whether it be residents, town and parish councils, businesses or anybody else whom the Department for Transport’s HS2 plans could impact upon in some way.

“I expect there to be plenty of feedback, both good and bad. This is understandable and I say to you now, we are listening to you, we will represent you and we will work together to do what is right for Cheshire East as a whole.”

To get involved in this important conversation, please visit www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/hs2 and fill in our online web form, call 01270 686022 or email hs2enquiries@cheshireeast.gov.uk

Meanwhile, Ian Jordan, HS2 Ltd director for Leeds, Manchester and Heathrow, has indicated that people whose properties face demolition will be given compensation at “fair, unblighted market value”.

A consultation on the Exceptional Hardship Scheme (EHS), which aims to provide assistance for those property owners who are potentially more adversely affected by the proposal has begun and will close on April 29, 2013. People can take part by visiting http://www.hs2.org.uk/have-your-say/consultations/phase-two/exceptional-hardship-scheme

Meanwhile, the HS2 public enquiries team is available on 020 7944 4908 or HS2enquiries@hs2.org.uk

Spread the warmth

 

Cheshire East Council and Age UK Cheshire, in association with their partners and the Local Adult Safeguarding Board, are offering a range of advice and support to residents on how to keep warm, well and safe this winter.

The Council has put together a wealth of detail in one place at: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/winter, where residents can find advice on a wide range of topics from heating, eating and winter safety to school closures and public transport.

This week, we look at what people can do in Cheshire East during the winter period.

Winter ‘what’s on’ guide

You don’t have to stay at home to keep warm, well and safe this winter.

A vast array of activities are on offer to people of all ages throughout Cheshire East and now might be the best time to take advantage.

From tai chi to coffee mornings, Pilates lessons to senior citizens’ lunches, there is plenty to do.

And they can be enjoyed in warm, safe environments where people can socialise and make new friends.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cabinet member in charge of health and adult social care, said: “We may all feel less inclined to get out and about when the weather is cold but, following a short journey, there are a lot of activities which people can get involved in across all our towns and villages.

“Many are free of charge and some are available at a small price. Also, our health improvement team runs a variety of programmes in partnership with Age UK and housing associations.

“These sessions provide a social opportunity to restore confidence, maintain independence, reduce falls and improve mobility, strength, balance and flexibility.”

Sean Reynolds, the chair of the Cheshire East Adult Safeguarding Board, added: “Most of us can now expect to live very much longer than our parents did and this provides opportunities to extend our contribution to family and community life – and this could be as carers, grandparents or volunteers.

“It helps to keep ourselves as fit, alert and healthy as possible, particularly during the cold, dark winter months. The Adult Safeguarding Board welcomes the efforts of the Council to publicise the wide variety of voluntary and private-sector programmes available to Cheshire East residents.

“Unfortunately, older people can also be victims of various forms of abuse, often in their own homes. The more social contact they have outside, the greater the opportunities for them to seek advice and support.”

Senior citizen’s lunches, which cost £3.50, take place every Tuesday and Thursday at 12.30pm at Knutsford Methodist Church and weekly free meditation classes are on offer at The MedShed, in Elworth, near Sandbach, on Tuesdays at 8pm.

Many more activities, including the popular Be Steady, Be Safe classes, which are designed to improve leg strength and balance in older people, can be found in Cheshire East’s comprehensive guide of things to do at: whatson.cheshireeast.gov.uk

For more information, call 01270 685794.

CREWE ALLOTMENTS DISPOSAL PROCESS CRITICISED

             

The process by which all the Council allotments in Crewe are to be disposed of has been criticised. Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor Brian Silvester said, " I was approached by a constituent who rents an allotment in Crewe and he was very concerned. I have now managed to ascertain that the plan is to transfer the allotments to the new Crewe Town Council,on a 150 year lease, when it is elected later in the year but this is not mentioned in the public notices that have been published.( See notes below) The Borough Council have no way of knowing if the Town Council will  want to lease the allotments so the action is premature and could lead to an unnecessary loss of Council funds. Even if the Town Council are interested other parties could outbid them for the allotments. The Borough Council are trying to move forward in a mad rush and are in danger of becoming seriously unstuck. It is as if they have learned nothing from the Lyme Green fiasco. Cheshire East are moving forward without proper consultation with the allotment holders and local residents. This is just the latest example of where  a decision has taken place before any consultation has begun. The Borough Council need to get their act together."

Cllr Brian Silvester BA (Hons)
Willaston and Rope Ward Councillor

Tel/fax 01270 567757

CHESHIRE EAST BOROUGH COUNCIL

Local Government Act 1972 as amended

by the Local Government Planning and Land Act 1980

DISPOSAL OF PUBLIC OPEN SPACE

ALLOTMENTS AT ELECTRICITY STREET CREWE CHESHIRE

1. Cheshire East Borough Council proposes, in accordance with Section 123 of the Local Government Act 1972 (as amended by Section 118 of the Local Planning and Land Act 1980) to dispose of the allotment land at Electricity Street, Crewe Cheshire by way of a lease together with rights of way.

2. The land referred to in paragraph 1 above totals 5379 square metres or thereabouts.

3. Full details of this proposal have been deposited together with plans at the Reception, Westfields, Middlewich Road, Sandbach CW11 1HZ and may be inspected free of charge during normal office hours, Monday to Friday. It is also available at www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/council_and_democracy/council_information/public_notices/open_space_disposal.aspx

4. Any representation or objection with respect to the proposal should be sent in writing to Michael Rowan, Legal Services, Cheshire East Borough Council, Westfields, Middlewich Road, Sandbach CW11 1HZ quoting reference JC.9511.Electricity no later than 5 pm on 8 March 2013. Please state the grounds on which it is made.

13 February 2013

Michael Rowan

Legal Services

Cheshire East Borough Council

Legal Services

Westfields

Middlewich Road

Sandbach

Cheshire

CW1 1HZ

Missing person appeal on behalf of Staffordshire Police

KarlJones

Staffordshire Police is appealing for the public to report any sightings of a missing man.

Karl Jones, aged 36, was reported missing by his family on January 5.

Mr Jones, who originates from the Stoke-on-Trent area, is urged to contact Staffordshire Police or a member of his family, or attend his nearest police station, to confirm he is safe and well.

Mr Jones is described as white with a tanned complexion, 5ft 7in tall, of slim build with short, straight, dark brown hair.

It is not clear what clothes he may be wearing.

A spokesperson for Staffordshire Police said: "We consider Mr Jones to be vulnerable and we are concerned for his welfare.

"Extensive searches are underway to locate him and we would ask that anyone who has seen him, or had any contact, to get in touch."

Anyone with information is asked to contact Staffordshire Police on 101 quoting incident number 593 of January 5.

Thursday, 14 February 2013

Leader seeks legal advice over Abbey Fields

 

Cheshire East Council Leader Michael Jones is seeking legal advice over the latest blow to Sandbach after the Government’s planning inspector overturned a decision on unsustainable development.

The Council turned down plans for 280 dwellings on land off Abbey Road and Middlewich Road in Sandbach. But on appeal, the Government’s planning inspector upheld the case made by Fox Strategic Land and Property.

The Leader has now written to the Government to express his disappointment and dismay on behalf of Sandbach residents. He said: “We will be looking at the all our options to try and put forward a robust case and persuade the Government that this development is surplus to requirements and not what the people of Sandbach want.”

The blow comes at a time when the Council is making rapid progress with its Local Plan and has just approved its five year housing land supply (Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment). This should act as a defence against speculative developers.

Also a finalised Local Plan document should be sent for approval to the Government in summer. Cheshire East is one of many local authorities without a Local Plan in place following unsupported Local Government Reorganisation prior to 2009. The Council is currently consulting on the Development Strategy for the Borough, which is a robust, jobs-led strategy to deliver targeted and sustainable development in Cheshire East.

It will deliver 27,000 new houses and 20,000 new jobs and the infrastructure needed to make this happen, ensuring that Cheshire East remains an economic powerhouse of the North West as identified by the recent HS2 announcement and a beautiful place to live,

Wednesday, 13 February 2013

Cheshire East Council’s libraries events

Cheshire East Council’s libraries are the place to be over the half-term break, with lots of fun activities to keep the children entertained.

Events are being held all over the borough and parents are advised to book beforehand to avoid disappointment.

Library

Event

Date

Time

Price

Alderley Edge

Friendship Crafts

Friday, February 22.

10.30am

£2

Alsager

Animalz Take Over

Wednesday, February 20

11am

£3

Bollington

Friendship Crafts

Tuesday, February 19

10.30am

£2

Congleton

Active Play

Animalz Take Over

Monday, February 18

Thursday, February 21

10.30am

2pm

£2

£3

Crewe

Friendship Crafts

Active Play

Friday, February 22

Friday, February 22

10am

11.15am

£2

£2

Disley

Spring Bunting Craft Event

Wednesday, February 20

2pm

£2

Handforth

Friendship Crafts

Tuesday, February 19

10.30am

£2

Holmes Chapel

Animalz Take Over

Thursday, February 21

11am

£3

Knutsford

Friendship Crafts

Thursday, February 21

10.30am

£2

Macclesfield

Friendship Crafts

Active Play

Thursday, February 21

Friday, February 22

10.30am

10.30am

£2

£2

Middlewich

Mosaic and paper weaving for children

Monday, February 18

11am

£1

Nantwich

Friendship Crafts

Tuesday, February 19

10.30am

£2

Poynton

Friendship Crafts

Thursday, February 21

10.30am

£2

Fantastic Mr Fox

Friday, February 22

11am

Free

Sandbach

Saturday storytime

Animals Take Over

Saturday, February 16

Wednesday, February 20

11am

3pm

Wilmslow

Friendship Crafts

Monday, February 18

10.30am

£2

You can find more information on the Cheshire East Libraries website: http://www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/leisure,_culture_and_tourism/libraries.aspx

and individual libraries’ facebook pages

Please contact the individual library for further information and to book in advance, as places may be limited.

Children must be accompanied by an adult at all children’s events. Please ask about family tickets.

Commissioner supports campaign highlighting teenage relationship abuse

 

John Dwyer, the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire is supporting Cheshire Constabulary′s ‘Speak Out′ domestic abuse campaign and the Home Office ‘This Is Abuse′ campaign which are set to launch today.

John Dwyer said, "being a victim of abuse can be a traumatic and life changing experience, no matter what age you are. I praise the work that Cheshire Constabulary and the Home Office are doing to raise the awareness of domestic abuse in relationships and hope it encourages more young people to come forward."

John will appoint a Youth Ambassador who will work to deliver key messages to the young people of Cheshire on issues such as domestic abuse and internet safety, as well as providing them with a point of contact to have their say about policing.

The Home Office ‘This is Abuse′ campaign is targeting domestic abuse in teenage relationships, and is urging young people to change their lives and put a stop to either being in an abusive relationship or stop being a perpetrator of abuse. It encourages teenagers to re-think their views of violence, abuse or controlling behaviour in relationships and directs them to places for help and advice.

Cheshire Constabulary′s ‘Speak Out′ campaign will be focussing on how victims of abuse can get help. The Constabulary are promoting this both through their website (http://www.cheshire.police.uk/) and through their young person′s Upbeat website (http://www.upbeat.uk.com/).

John added, "young people are a very important part of our communities. I hope that both of the campaigns that are running will encourage young people to report violent partners or recognise that some of their behaviour towards their partner is abusive."

Council starts a fresh conversation on the need to plan for Tatton’s future

 

Cheshire East Council is using the release of a report on the proposed BeWILDerwood children’s adventure area at Tatton Park to raise wider local awareness of the ‘Tatton Vision’ and how it sets out to secure the historic estate’s future as a much-loved local and visitor amenity. 

The concept of a new visitor attraction at Tatton Park is a key element of the ‘Tatton Vision’ – which is already being brought to life through other investment in areas such as the stableyard project and Tattondale Farm.

This vision aims to create a self-sustaining Tatton Park which offers an enhanced visitor experience for both local people and visitors from further afield for many years to come.

Councillor Jamie Macrae, Cabinet member with responsibility for prosperity and economic regeneration, said: “Tatton Park is currently one of the region’s premier visitor destinations, welcoming over 800,000 people each year.

“The Vision will build on the investment being made in Tatton and the commitment of the Council to secure the estate and its proud heritage for future generations.

“We are choosing to move forward with the BeWILDerwood attraction as we feel it would be sympathetic to the park’s natural woodland environment. Additionally, we are confident it will attract new family groups to Tatton, create new jobs and open up a part of the estate that was previously inaccessible to the public.

“There is a range of groups in the local community that want to secure the future of Tatton. Now is the time for all of us with an interest in its future to work together to achieve this.

“The current planning application will shortly be resubmitted and I would encourage people to engage with us during the consultation period to let us know their thoughts.”

As part of its commitment to open and transparent decision making, the Council has chosen not to challenge the Information Commissioner’s findings that a confidential Cabinet document should be released to the public. The report looks at the business case for the BeWILDerwood project.

The authority had previously decided not to release the report on the grounds of commercial confidentiality.

In rare circumstances, the Council needs to keep sensitive business information confidential, initially, to allow negotiations to take place and get the best deal for local taxpayers and residents.

Councillor Macrae added: “We understand the interest in this matter but we have taken the appropriate advice at all stages of the process and have acted fully within this.

“The Information Commissioner has accepted this but we felt it was important to clear the air, so that we could start a fresh and more positive conversation about the best way to secure Tatton’s future.”

Monday, 11 February 2013

Man jailed for seven years for child sex offences

Russell Haddock 20-12-82

A man from Crewe has been jailed for seven years for child sex offences.

Russell Haddock, 30, was sentenced at Chester Crown Court on Monday 11 February for six sexual offences against three female victims under the age of 13.

In addition to his jail term, he is required to sign on to the sex offenders register for life.

The investigation into Haddock began when the victims of the offences came forward to police. The offences took place in the Crewe area between 2002 and 2005.

PC Stephanie Montague of the Dedicated Rape Unit said: "The nature of this man′s crimes cannot be underestimated. He took advantage of his position of trust and preyed on vulnerable young girls who will live with the experience for the rest of their lives. It was incredibly brave of them to come forward.

"Sexual offences against children are amongst the most traumatic of crimes. We want victims to be assured that we are here to help. Anyone who has been subjected to this type of crime should feel confident that they will receive the support they need from the police and other support agencies we work alongside. Foremost, any victim of a crime such as this will be treated with the dignity and respect they deserve, and any allegations will be thoroughly investigated and with the needs of the victim as our main priority."

Cheshire Police say ‘speak out’ this Valentines!

 

Do not suffer in silence this Valentine’s Day − that is the message that Cheshire Police want to give out.

Cheshire Police’s ‘speak out, don’t be silent’ campaign seeks to encourage victims to speak out. Officers receive specialist training in investigating this type of crime. They work closely alongside a number of voluntary organisations and council departments within the local community to tackle the issue and to provide a life line to the victim and places of safety if needed.

Valentine’s Day should be a day filled with romance − with ‘loved up’ couples showing their affection for each other on this special day. At this time of year, the message to speak out is particularly pertinent as many celebrate their love for each other whilst undertones of domestic abuse can be prevalent through other times of the year in a relationship. Domestic abuse is not just confined to women - many men and women continue to endure domestic abuse and sexual violence for the sake of keeping their relationship together at these times.

No one should have to put up with emotional, physical or sexual abuse by their partner. Being abused can often result in low self esteem for the victim, particularly if the abuse continues over a sustained period which can feel isolating if there is nowhere else to turn. A feeling of desperation can result because in some cases their partner may have pressured them into severing ties with their family and friends making it difficult for them to confide in someone close.

Detective Chief Inspector Nigel Wenham, who leads the Strategic Public Protection Unit with Cheshire Constabulary, said: "We hope that by raising awareness of the issue and reinforcing our commitment to victims of abuse that it will encourage more victims to come forward. Domestic abuse is an issue that Cheshire Police takes extremely seriously and is not acceptable under any circumstances. We are committed to taking action to bring offenders to justice and holding them to account for their behaviour. We urge anyone who is a victim, male or female, of any type of domestic abuse to come forward and report it. Every report will be treated confidentially."

Domestic abuse will not be tolerated and subjecting others to acts of violence - often resulting in injury, so the message to all abusers is to think about the consequences of your actions.

You can read more about ‘speak out, don’t be silent’ at www.cheshire.police.uk

In an emergency always dial 999 or for a non emergency contact 101.

Find out more about being a local councillor for Crewe

 

Two public meetings are being staged this week for anyone interested in becoming a local councillor on Crewe Parish Council*.

Those who feel passionate about helping their community and believe they can make a difference to people’s lives are welcome to attend the Municipal Buildings, in Crewe, on Wednesday, February 13 at 7pm and Friday, February 15 at 2.30pm.

The Crewe parish is to be divided into six wards and will comprise 20 councillors. These are broken down as follows:

· Crewe St Barnabas – 2

· Crewe Central – 2

· Crewe North – 2

· Crewe South (except for Gresty Brook) – 4

· Crewe East – 6

· Crewe West – 4

A reorganisation order to formally establish the council is available for inspection at Cheshire East Council’s headquarters, in Westfields, Sandbach, from 9am until 5pm on weekdays. An election to fill the council’s seats will be held on April 4.

Anyone who wants further information should call Cheshire East Council’s elections team on 01270 685922.

Do you have a tasty recipe to share at the Great Hospice Bake Off 2013?

St Luke's (Cheshire) Hospice volunteers get in the spirit ahead of the Great Hospice Bake Off 2013

St Luke’s (Cheshire) Hospice is inviting the area’s home cooks to rise to the challenge for the second heat of its fun-filled Great Hospice Bake Off & Sale 2013.

The Winsford hospice is looking for the freshest, quirkiest and most delicious culinary creations from across South and Mid Cheshire to be judged on Sunday, 24 February, and help raise invaluable funds for the hospice.

The tasty competition will take place in the lecture room at the hospice at Grosvenor House, Queensway, Winsford, CW7 1BH, and once they have been judged and placed on mouth-watering display, all the gorgeous food will be on sale from 1.30pm onwards.

There are now 10 categories for cooks to compete in, for a donation of just £2 per entry.

St Luke’s Fundraising Events Co-ordinator Rachael Knight commented: “The Great Hospice Bake Off 2013 is a fantastic opportunity for the people of South and Mid Cheshire to show off their skills in the kitchen.

“There is a great fun atmosphere at the event and I guarantee the hall will smell amazing.

“You can enter as many categories as you like and judging is anonymous with only the winners’ names announced. The winner of each category will win a prize.”

New to this year’s competition is the children under 12’s category which is free to enter.

The winning entries of the adult heat will progress to the Grand Live final of the Great Hospice Bake Off which forms part of the hospice’s Silver Jubilee celebrations this year.

The overall winner will receive a host of fabulous prizes to include a fantastic day at a famous cookery school.

To download a registration form go to www.stlukes-hospice.co.uk/bake-off.

For more information contact Rachael on 01606 555687 or e-mail rachael_knight@stlukes-hospice.co.uk.

This year’s categories are:

  • Class 1: Lemon Drizzle Cake
  • Class 2: Coffee Cake
  • Class 3: Biscuits or Cookies x 6
  • Class 4: Battenberg Cake
  • Class 5: Savory Muffins x 6
  • Class 6: Sausage Rolls x 6
  • Class 7: Chocolate Cake
  • Class 8: Flapjacks x 6
  • Class 9: Decorated Cupcakes x 6
  • Class 10: Fruit Loaf

Children’s categories:

  • Decorated Cupcakes x 6
  • Gingerbread Men x 6
  • Tray bake of your choice

Action Fraud launches in Cheshire

 

Police forces across the North West region are joining a national scheme aimed at helping to tackle the growing problem of fraud. Cheshire Police will be amongst the forces going live with the launch on 18 February whereby this move to new ways of reporting will change the way that fraudulent crimes will be collated and used to detect crimes as well as build up intelligence about fraud and fraudsters in the locality.

Action Fraud has been operational since 2009, and has been designed to handle many thousands of reports of fraud and internet crime a month. There have been over one million unique visitors to the Action Fraud website since it was launched nationally.

Cheshire, Merseyside and Lancashire Police have all signed up to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud reporting centre. From Monday 18 February, victims of fraud should contact Action Fraud via the national number or website. Anyone reporting fraud to Cheshire Police will be referred to Action Fraud unless the victim is perceived to be vulnerable or an immediate police response will result in the offender being caught.  By April 2013, all police forces in England and Wales will be directing the public to this service.

When reporting a crime to Action Fraud, a national crime reference number is generated and the case is referred onto the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau for analysis before it is dispatched out to the relevant force where the criminal activity is taking place. This new system of reporting will allow for centralised intelligence and help identify and disrupt networks of criminal gang activity so that seemingly unrelated incidents from around the country can be linked through analysis. This will identify networks of criminals and will help prevent other people from becoming victims themselves.

Cheshire Police will continue to take reports of serious fraud and deal with cases where a crime is in action or where the victim is particularly vulnerable.

Detective Superintendent Geraint Jones said: "The purpose of Action Fraud is two fold: firstly to make it easier for the public to report fraud and secondly, to develop intelligence, look at trends and enable a better investigation to come out of the process. The result will be a speedier, more intelligent and more efficient process.

"Fraud is a serious crime. It impacts on all kinds of communities, in particular, vulnerable people. This type of criminality needs to be clamped down upon and the offenders need to be brought to justice."

It is estimated that fraud costs the British economy £73 billion every year. This includes anything from simple online scams to organised gangs targeting vulnerable people.  In some cases, the offenders are located outside of the country.

To report fraud, Action Fraud can be contacted directly by phone on 0300 123 2040 or online through www.actionfraud.police.uk. For more information about different types of fraud and how you can prevent yourself becoming a victim, please visit www.cheshire.police.uk.

The Wistaston Parish Council's annual Civic Service

The Wistaston Parish Council's annual Civic Service took place on Sunday 10th February 2013.

St Marys Church Wistaston

St Mary's Church in Wistaston was full for the Service, which was organised by the Wistaston Parish Council. The Chairman of the Wistaston Parish Council Cllr John Moore had invited the Mayor & Mayoress of Cheshire East (Cllr George Walton and his wife Veronica). The Service was taken by Rev Mike Turnbull and the Preacher was Rev Ken Sambrook. The Organist was John Axon. Musical items were performed by the Wistaston Church Lane Primary School Choir and the Shavington High School Wind Ensemble.

Many representatives of community organisations had been invited to attend; including Beavers, Cubs and Scouts from the 35th South West Cheshire Group and all the Parish Councillors.

All who attended were invited to the Church Hall after the Service for refreshments.

A spokesman said, "It was a most successful community event, enjoyed by so many different local organisations and their representatives."

Sunday, 10 February 2013

Children play smoke free in Cheshire East

IMG_6519

Dozens of signs are being installed throughout Cheshire East to help discourage people from smoking in children’s play areas.

A total of 170 play areas will be covered by the Play Smokefree code, which has been developed by heart health charity Heart of Mersey in partnership with Cheshire East Council, Central and Eastern Cheshire Primary Care Trust (PCT) and the Cheshire and Merseyside Tobacco Alliance.

A survey of Cheshire East residents, 22.2 per cent of whom were smokers, highlighted that nearly all (97.5 per cent) are in favour of a voluntary code of not smoking in playgrounds.

Park wardens will discourage people who persist in smoking in play areas and by signage designed by children requesting that children be allowed to ‘Play Smokefree’.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cabinet member in charge of health and adult social care, said: “We’re committed to the role our parks play in helping residents live active, healthy lifestyles and this voluntary scheme empowers our local communities themselves to change their smoking behaviour.

“Children learn their behaviour from adults. If children see smoking as a normal part of everyday life they are more likely to become smokers themselves. I think that, knowing this, most adults would agree that not lighting up in a children’s play area is not too much of a sacrifice and I hope residents will support this initiative.

“Discouraging smoking around children in our play areas will help to reduce the number of young people in Cheshire East that smoke.”

The Council’s health improvement team has been heavily involved in the scheme and its role is to ensure that services are provided to help improve and protect the health of people in Cheshire East.

The team works in partnership with a wide range of organisations in order to achieve their shared goals of making Cheshire East a healthier and safer place to live.

Research shows that reducing child exposure to smoking decreases the uptake of smoking among young people in the long term.

Jo McCullagh, tobacco control programme lead at Heart of Mersey, said: “Three out of four children are aware of cigarettes before they reach the age of five.

“People smoking in children’s play areas is a fairly common sight, but it suggests to children that smoking is a harmless, acceptable, everyday activity. The reality is that this is a habit that is addictive and kills.

“A child who smokes just one cigarette doubles their chances of becoming a regular smoker by the age of 17.

“We want to use this voluntary code to de-normalise smoking in public play areas and protect children in the very environment in which they should be safe.”

Friday, 8 February 2013

Breaking News

At 10 oclock tonight there has been a big fire at Mirion St youth club building the hut next to the club Flames were as high as the houses. No more details at the moment

Wilmslow and Knutsford police warn residents to be vigilant after ATM distraction thefts

 

Police in Knutsford and Wilmslow are urging the public to think before they punch their pin number into a cash machine following two distraction incidents on Wednesday 6 February 2013.
Sgt Andy Miller said: "We′re urging the public to be vigilant following an attempted distraction theft at an ATM in Knutsford where a woman was watched using the machine in Canute Square at around 10.40am. A man and woman, described as Eastern European, then tried to get her to open her bag saying she had dropped money on the floor.

"This happened again in Grove Street in Wilmslow at around 1.19pm, but this time the thieves were successful and managed to distract her by pretending to help her look for the money. They then stole her debit card out of her hand."
In such incidents someone will have been watching over the victims shoulder as they typed in their pin number.
To make life difficult for these distraction thieves, residents are urged to check no one is watching when they punch their pin into an ATM or chip and pin device and always attempt to conceal the number.

Anyone with information relating to these two incidents or who sees someone acting suspiciously should contact police on 101.

Anyone with information can also contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Warning over roadside scam

 

Cheshire Police are warning motorists to beware of a scam involving men claiming to have broken down, who say they need money for fuel.

In the reported cases, motorists have been flagged down by men from a supposedly broken down car. They have either asked the victims for cash so that they can buy fuel or pay for taxi fair, or offered jewellery in exchange for cash.

The men operating this scam have been working in groups and appear to be targeting lone female drivers.

The scam has been reported nationally with incidents taking place in towns and rural areas as well as motorway service stations.

Superintendent Jon Betts said: "There have been no reports of the men operating this scam using violence but they can be very intimidating to their victims.

"We ask motorists to be wary of anyone flagging them down under suspicious circumstances and would ask them to report any similar incidents to police."

Anyone who believes they have been a victim of this scam, or who sees anyone acting suspiciously, should contact Cheshire Police on 101, or 999 in an emergency or where there is a crime in progress.

Tuesday, 5 February 2013

Giving more for less

 

The Council is considering detailed plans to give local people better value for money by cutting its costs and spending, while also protecting essential frontline jobs and services.

The focus of this is on reducing waste, duplication and bureaucracy, as well as cutting management overheads. 

But a large part of our spending is on staff wages and salaries and these must also be reduced to meet the more limited funding available to us in the future.

To do this, we need to change the way we work, so that we can do more to improve the quality of life of our local residents with fewer people than we employed in the past.

As one of the largest employers in the area, the Council currently employs about 5,500 staff (though many of these work part time), excluding staff in local schools. The total cost of our wage bill is about £140m a year.

By taking advantage of natural turnover, as people leave or retire, our planned changes will reduce the size of our workforce by about 1,000 posts over the next few years. This will be achieved without large-scale redundancies or major cuts to essential services.

Our new ways of delivering services will include setting up, and transferring staff to, new social enterprises, staff mutuals (like John Lewis) and arms-length companies owned by the Council, as well as outsourcing some services to the voluntary sector and the private sector, as we do now. 

We expect that in three years’ time, about 1,000 staff will be employed in these local businesses, and will be contributing to the growing strength of the Cheshire East economy.

Cheshire East Council Leader, Councillor Michael Jones said: “I am proud of the quality and creative thinking of our staff. They do a fantastic job in difficult circumstances.

“What I’m clear about achieving through our top down review of management structures is that we keep our most talented staff and give them the freedom to do an even better job for local people.

“As a good local employer, we will do all we can to support our staff through these changes. This will include finding suitable alternative work, where necessary, and investing in retraining them to keep their skills up to date.

“Our bold, but careful approach will give priority to protecting essential frontline jobs, and to investing in good-quality, value-for-money services.”

Brownfield first – not Greenfield siege

 

Cheshire East Council Leader Michael Jones has today called for a renewal of the ‘Brownfield First Policy’ to protect Cheshire East’s green fields.

He said: “Cheshire East is a green and pleasant land and I understand and fully support the strong community desire to keep it this way.   However, it is for this very reason that developers see Cheshire East as the most desirable place to build and sell houses.

“However development is a necessary reality if we are to keep Cheshire East a desirable and economically-vibrant place to live and work. It is heartening to note that a common trend emerging through the Draft Development Strategy is that residents recognise too that we must grow in order to thrive.

“However, by far the main theme developing in the comments we have received is that people want to see redevelopment of brownfield sites. I agree and wholly support this view, which is why I am calling for a renewal of this policy and for all brownfield sites that can be developed on, be brought forward as quickly as possible.

“This ongoing consultation has been very successful and has given us a clear view of what the people of Cheshire East want for the future. They have made their views plain and the Council is listening, which is why I am calling for the renewal of our Brownfield First policy.

“For every 12 houses built on brownfield land, one acre of greenfield is saved. That is a clear fact and one we must – and will - bear in mind at all times.

“Developing greenfield sites can be seen by developers as the easy option.  Cheshire East does not support this approach, and our draft development strategy proposes greenfield swaps and a wider green space strategy underlining our commitment to greenfield development.

“Time and time again I hear from residents that there is more brownfield land available, and I want to make it very clear that we support the development of these brownfield sites. This is land which has previously been used for any purpose but is no longer in use or is underused. If people can find enough brownfield sites, Cheshire East will support no development in green spaces

“This is a collective responsibility, for all of us to look for opportunities for developing on brownfield first.  I know this isn’t always easy, but we are here to help.  If you have sites and plans but are facing constraints in developing them - let us know. We won’t always have the answer, but together we can find a way.

“To date we have identified brownfield areas that will equate to 7,000 new houses.  However, we know there will be more sites out there. Whilst these figures show that we have made good progress, our area is changing all the time and we need to work together to identify more sites as they become available.

“Protecting the greenfields of Cheshire East is a number one priority for me, and I will stand by that commitment.

The draft Development Strategy document is available to see by visiting: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/localplan where there is also a chance to have your say and fill out a feedback questionnaire.

The Development Strategy document is also available to view at any of our libraries, or by visiting the Council’s Delamere House in Crewe; Macclesfield Town Hall; and the Council’s offices at Westfields in Sandbach.  The Local Plan consultation ends on February 26, 2013.

For planning advice and information contact: planningpolicyconsultation@cheshireeast.gov.uk or call 01270 658893